Trails: Catskills

Besides the thirty-five 3500 foot peaks in the Catskills, there are many other smaller mountains to climb. In addition, there are hundreds of miles of trails to hike. There are also MANY other places to hike also. I have divided the Trails section into list of All Trail, the Catskills, the Shawangunks, Bear Mt/Harriman, East Hudson, West Hudson, New Jersey and Other Trails. The All Trails list is almost 250 different trails and may load slowly on your computer. The “divided” list should load more quickly. Clicking on new-house-icon will bring up an index of trails. Clicking on new-arrow-up will return you to the top of the page.

Acra Point Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.1 mi 1100 ft GPSies

acrapt_mapPark at trail head parking area on Black Dome or Big Hollow Road. Be aware that past a certain point this road is considered seasonal and may not be plowed or maintained. During the winter the trailhead parking is almost never plowed and parking is limited along the shoulders of the road. The trail head is just BEFORE the parking area on the right. Find the red-blazed Black Dome Trail and immediately cross the Batavia Kill on a bridge. After a short walk, re-cross the Batavia Kill and continue on the trail for about 1.1 miles. This second crossing has no bridge and can be tricky at times! Look over your shoulder occasionally to see the imposing presence of Blackhead, Black Dome and Thomas Cole Mountains. This walk winds its way upward through mixed hardwood and spruce forest until it meets the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail. Turn right on The Escarpment Trail and head toward Acra Point. The terrain now is more rugged and steeper. There is a hint of views to both the north and south on both sides of the trail but they are not clear. Walk off the trail on the left to get a view to the north toward Albany or wait until just after the top of Acra Point. After about .7 miles you will be at the summit of Acra Point. The best views to the south and west are from a lookout BEFORE the summit. The path is well-traveled and is easy to find. When you walk out onto the rock shelf, you are treated to a spectacular view of the three mountains and the Camel’s Hump. The views down the Black Dome Valley to the west are also excellent. From here you can also see Burnt Knob and behind and to the right Windham Mountain. Continue on the Escarpment Trail for another 1.75 miles. The trail skirts a hill nearly as high as Acra. Views to the north from the trail continue to be elusive.The trail descends but has several short ascents before it heads down to meet the Batavia Kill Trail. The Escarpment Trail continues up over Blackhead Mountain. As you descend the trail toward the Batavia Kill Trail junction it looks very much as if you MUST ascend this mountain! Turn right on the yellow-blazed Batavia Kill Trail to return to the parking area. This trail goes on for about 1 mile and ends. Be sure to turn right and follow the red-blazed Black Dome Trail and the signs to the parking area about .6 miles away. If you turn left, you will be climbing to the col between Blackhead and Black Dome! Bridges span the widest and deepest water crossings near the end of the trail. There is also evidence of a dam and the foundations of a mill on the Batavia Kill.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

acrapt_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Acra Point and Burnt Knobnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 4.2 mi 1320 ft GPSies

acraknob_mapPark at trail head parking area on Black Dome or Big Hollow Road. Be aware that past a certain point this road is considered seasonal and may not be plowed or maintained. During the winter the trailhead parking is almost never plowed and parking is limited along the shoulders of the road. The trail head is just BEFORE the parking area on the right. Find the red-blazed Black Dome Trail and immediately cross the Batavia Kill on a bridge. After a short walk, re-cross the Batavia Kill and continue on the trail for about 1.1 miles. This second crossing has no bridge and can be tricky at times! Look over your shoulder occasionally to see the imposing presence of Blackhead, Black Dome and Thomas Cole Mountains. This walk winds its way upward through mixed hardwood and spruce forest until it meets the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail. Turn right on The Escarpment Trail and head toward Acra Point. The terrain now is more rugged and steeper. There is a hint of views to both the north and south on both sides of the trail but they are not clear. Walk off the trail on the left to get a view to the north toward Albany or wait until just after the top of Acra Point. After about .7 miles you will be at the summit of Acra Point. The best views to the south and west are from a lookout BEFORE the summit. The path is well-traveled and is easy to find. When you walk out onto the rock shelf, you are treated to a spectacular view of the three mountains and the Camel’s Hump. The views down the Black Dome Valley to the west are also excellent. From here you can also see Burnt Knob and behind and to the right Windham Mountain. Retrace your steps back down to the junction of the Black Dome Trail and the Escarpment Trail. Continue straight ahead toward Burnt Knob. The summit is only about .5 miles from the trail junction but it is eroded and steep in some places. During the winter the snow conditions may make it almost impossible to negotiate. The best views are on the left of the trail just BEFORE the summit. Several short spur trails lead out to viewpoints. If you continue passed the summit you will descend slightly. Just before a steeper descent on the way to Windham High Peak look ahead for a nice view of this peak. The view is better in fall and winter when there are few leaves on the trees. Turn around and retrace your path back to the trail junction. Turn right to go back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

acraknob_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Alder Lake: Bushwhacknew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 10.3 mi. 2143 ft. GPSies

Alder Lake (bushwhack)_mapTake the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the Alder Creek Road. Alder Creek Road is a left turn off the Beaverkill Road about two miles after it makes a sharp right turn near the Barkaboom Road that goes to the Little Pond State Campgrounds. Go to the end of Alder Creek Road and turn right into the access road to Alder Lake. Bearing left will take you over to the Millbrook-Arena Road on Cross Mountain Road. Park in the parking lot and walk back down the driveway/access road to a woods road that turns left up to another small parking area and then continues parallel to Cross Mountain Road for some distance. When the woods road begins to dip down to Cross Mountain Road, turn UP the hill and find your route to the top. You may find all woods roads along the way so feel free to explore. There are several different places where the ground levels and then continues up again. Eventually you will be on flatter ground near the summit where you will find some ledges. Walking along the ledges may reveal some glimpses over to Barkaboom Mountain. Walk around on the relatively flat summit and you may find a cairn that looks like it once marked property lines. When you are done on the top, turn south to head back to the parking area. Again, woods roads can be found but this area is full of prickers and the open woods roads allow them to grow more easily. The first part of the descent is gentle but then becomes very steep. Wander round to find your best route down. Watch for glimpses of Alder lake as you descend back to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

Alder Lake (bushwhack)_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike.)


Alder Lake: Little Pondnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 10.3 mi. 2143 ft. GPSies

touchmenot_mapTake the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the Alder Creek Road. Alder Creek Road is a left turn off the Beaverkill Road about two miles after it makes a sharp right turn near the Barkaboom Road that goes to the Little Pond State Campgrounds. Go to the end of Alder Creek Road and turn right into the access road to Alder Lake. Bearing left will take you over to the Millbrook-Arena Road on Cross Mountain Road. Park in the parking lot and walk back down the driveway/access road and cross Alder Creek Road. Finding the red-blazed Touch-Me-Not Trail can be tricky and once found it can be hard to follow in places as it is NOT clearly marked. The trail rises and falls over the shoulders of several mountains. After 3.5 miles you arrive at the Big Pond trail head parking area on the Barkaboom Rd. Walk down the access road to the main road. Turn right on the road and follow it for a short distance then make a left up into the woods. After another .75 miles, you will be near the top of Touch-Me-Not Mountain. At this point turn left and hike 1.15 miles to Little Pond Campgrounds on the blue Campgrounds Trail. This descent is a steep, at times, but short. Walk .85 miles down the access road/driveway to the Barkaboom Road and make a right. Walk a short distance to the Beaverkill Road and turn left. Walk on the Beaverkill Road for about 1.4 miles and make a left on Alder Creek Road. Alder Lake parking is about 2.5 miles away at the end of the road.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

touchmenot_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. The highest point is near the summit of Touch-Me-Not Mountain. The lowest spot is the junction of the Barkaboom and Beaverkill Roads.)


Alder Lake: Millbrook Ridgenew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 8.6 mi. 1940 ft. GPSies

alder_map I had lived in Livingston Manor for 25 years before I managed to visit Alder Lake. Several people had told me how beautiful it is but I just hadn’t made it there. The lake IS very pretty and is frequented by many people. Campsites dot the entire perimeter of the lake. The Alder Lake Loop Trail is about 1.6 miles and suitable for beginners with only a slight rise on one side. The hikes to the Beecher Lake overlook or to Balsam Lake Mountain on the other hand have several steep areas and can be quite a challenge. The distances, 8 and 13 miles respectively, may also be daunting for some. The map shows the out and back route from Alder Lake along Millbrook Ridge to the Beecher Lake overlook. I have labeled some of the the points of interest along the way. The Beecher Lake overlook is beautiful with a nice view of the lake and the Zen Buddhist monastery that is on its shores. Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the Alder Creek Road. Alder Creek Road is a left turn off the Beaverkill Road about two miles after it makes a sharp right turn near the Barkaboom Road that goes to the Little Pond State Campgrounds. Go to the end of Alder Creek Road and turn right into the access road to Alder Lake. Park in the parking lot and walk to the lake. The Coykendall mansion house that stood on the grounds has been removed by New York State as they did not have the money to maintain or restore it. Now only the stone work remains. As you walk toward the lake you may turn left or right to get on the red Alder Lake loop trail. After about .8 miles on this trail the yellow Millbrook Ridge trail breaks off heading east. The trail ascends very gently and after about 1.5 miles on the trail you arrive at the Beaver Meadow lean-to and spring. There once was a large beaver pond here but it is now being reclaimed and forming a meadow. Back on the trail you will pass another pond on your right after which the trail climbs more steeply. After about 1.35 miles you are at the highest point on the ridge (3480 ft). The trail then descends slightly before another ascent to the overlook; a distance of another 1.1 miles. The return trip simply reverses your trip out. When you get to the Alder Lake loop trail, you can go the other way around to add a little variety.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

alder_pro
(The image at the l the shows the vertical profile of the entire out and back route.)


Angel Fallsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 0.6 mi. 137 ft. GPSies

angelfalls_mapTurn onto Route 55A from Route 55 just east of the TriValley School in Grahamsville, Take the first right hand turn as Route 55A continues around the Rondout Reservoir. Drive for a little over 4 miles and turn left on Yahweh Road just before Route 55A crosses a creek on a bridge. After 1.2 miles turn right on Shalom Road which is now a DEAD END. Park at the end of the paved road near the power right-of-way but avoid parking on private property or blocking the private driveway. The DEP signs are confusing with some saying TRESPASSING and others inviting hikers to hike. Walk down the old road which is now crumbling. This road stays above the streambed for Tout Creek until it reaches the upper falls. You may walk to the stream above the falls before following the informal path that parallels the stream. Some paths lead down to the streambed to points that give excellent views of the upper falls. These paths are DANGEROUS under the best conditions! Continue on the informal paths which parallel the stream until you get to the area of the lower falls. The lower falls do not have a drop as high as the upper falls but they are beautiful in their own way. Walk to the rock shelf that allows access to the top of the lower falls to take some pictures. Continue along the creek and observe the stone foundations built next to the falls. Walk out to the stream bed using great caution to get a glimpse of the lower falls. When you are finished, head up the steep bank back to the old road and your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

angelfalls_pro
(The image shows the vertical profile of the entire out and back route.)


Ashokan High Point: Kanape Brook Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 8.1 mi. 2240 ft. GPSies

ashokanhploop_map Park at the Kanape Brook PA trailhead on the Peekamoose Road. Walk across the road and toward the Ashokan to pick up the trail. The first 2.7 miles is a rather gentle uphill walk. Much of the first part of the trail parallels Kanape Brook which can be heard as you walk along the trail. Several small bridges and culverts cross tributaries which increase the volume of the brook. The trail hear is a wide road typical of logging or quarrying roads that run throughout the Catskills. At the 2.7 mile mark make a pronounced left. The trail now narrows to a footpath but is marked and well-worn. You are immediately faced with a choice! The trail straight ahead continues upward fro about 1 mile to the Ashokan High Point. This trail gains about 1000 feet over the mile and there are several steep areas. Most of these areas have stone steps which make the climb easier. The trail to the left is longer but generally easier to climb. This 2.5 mile trail meanders up to the High Point. Once at the High Point itself you have a beautiful view of the mountains and valleys directly to the east. Depending on the foliage cover, you may be able to see a hint of the reservoir a little farther north or to the left as you gaze from the lookout. A little farther to the north and west the trail opens into several fields and can become hard to follow. Some visitors have built a fire circle surrounded by stone chairs. Walking to the north and east side of the field gives you a spectacular view of the Ashokan Reservoir. The view is NOT clear and is blocked by trees making the best viewing times when the leaves are not on the trees. Turning your gaze a little more to the north and west reveals the Burrough’s Range with the unmistakable outline of Wittenberg, Cornell, and Slide Mountains. After taking in the view, head to the left of the fireplace and follow a path into the woods to pick up the trail again. This 2.5 mile trail meanders down from the High Point back to the trail junction where you met it the first time. There are several steep and rocky areas to negotiate. Along the way there is at least one prominent path leading northwest but seemingly into nowhere. When the trail bends sharply to the left you can head southwest on a bushwhack which is steep in many places but will cut some distance off your return trip. Back at the trail junction it is only a matter of following the main trail back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the loop hiking route.)

ashokanhploop_pro

(The image shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Ashokan High Point: Kanape Brook Out and Backnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.3 mi. 2140 ft. GPSies

ashokanhpone_map Park at the Kanape Brook PA trailhead on the Peekamoose Road. Walk across the road and toward the Ashokan to pick up the trail. The first 2.7 miles is a rather gentle uphill walk. Much of the first part of the trail parallels Kanape Brook which can be heard as you walk along the trail. Several small bridges and culverts cross tributaries which increase the volume of the brook. The trail hear is a wide road typical of logging or quarrying roads that run throughout the Catskills. At the 2.7 mile mark make a pronounced left. The trail now narrows to a footpath but is marked and well-worn. You are immediately faced with a choice! The trail straight ahead continues upward fro about 1 mile to the Ashokan High Point. This trail gains about 1000 feet over the mile and there are several steep areas. Most of these areas have stone steps which make the climb easier. The trail to the left is longer but generally easier to climb. This 2.5 mile trail meanders up to the High Point. Once at the High Point itself you have a beautiful view of the mountains and valleys directly to the east. Depending on the foliage cover, you may be able to see a hint of the reservoir a little farther north or to the left as you gaze from the lookout. A little farther to the north and west the trail opens into several fields and can become hard to follow. Some visitors have built a fire circle surrounded by stone chairs. Walking to the north and east side of the field gives you a spectacular view of the Ashokan Reservoir. The view is NOT clear and is blocked by trees making the best viewing times when the leaves are not on the trees. Turning your gaze a little more to the north and west reveals the Burrough’s Range with the unmistakable outline of Wittenberg, Cornell, and Slide Mountains. To get back to your car turn around and retrace your path back to the parking area. The out and back allows a quick descent of the steeper sections for those who don’t mind this sort of thing.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

ashokanhpone_pro

(The image shows the profile of the out and back hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Ashokan High Point and Little Ashokan: Kanape Brook Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 9.8 mi. 2820 ft. GPSies

ashokanhplaloop_map Park at the Kanape Brook PA trailhead on the Peekamoose Road. Walk across the road and toward the Ashokan to pick up the trail. The first 2.7 miles is a rather gentle uphill walk. Much of the first part of the trail parallels Kanape Brook which can be heard as you walk along the trail. Several small bridges and culverts cross tributaries which increase the volume of the brook. The trail here is a wide road typical of logging or quarrying roads that run throughout the Catskills. At the 2.7 mile mark make a pronounced left. The trail now narrows to a footpath but is marked and well-worn. You are immediately faced with a choice! The trail straight ahead continues upward fro about 1 mile to the Ashokan High Point. This trail gains about 1000 feet over the mile and there are several steep areas. Most of these areas have stone steps which make the climb easier. The trail to the left is longer but generally easier to climb. Once at the High Point itself you have a beautiful view of the mountains and valleys directly to the east. Depending on the foliage cover, you may be able to see a hint of the reservoir a little farther north or to the left as you gaze from the lookout. From the High Point you may be able to see a path directly down between some of the rocks or a path further on leading down. This is the way to Little Ashokan High Point. The walk is about .5 miles and there is drop of about 350 feet to the lowest point before climbing back up to Little Ashokan. Whether or not you can find the path is not too important. just walk in the general direction and watch for the numerous steep areas and actual cliffs. Little Ashokan is filled with blueberry and huckleberry bushes which can make walking interesting unless you are on show shoes. Near the highest point are several flat rocks that make a good viewpoint back to the High Point and over to the Mombaccus-Little Rocky ridge. Dropping down a little to some lower paths and walking around to the left offers some more views but the reservoir is hard to see unless the leaves are off the trees. Views may be possible but unobstructed views for photography are few. After wandering around some, head back to the High Point more or less the way you came. From the High Point continue on the main trail. In a short distance on the left you may get some views in a small clearing. A little farther to the north and west the trail opens into several fields and can become hard to follow. Some visitors have built a fire circle surrounded by stone chairs. Walking to the north and east side of the field gives you a view of the Ashokan Reservoir. The view is NOT clear and is blocked by trees making the best viewing times when the leaves are not on the trees. Turning your gaze a little more to the north and west reveals the Burrough’s Range with the unmistakable outline of Wittenberg, Cornell, and Slide Mountains. After taking in the view, head to the left of the fireplace and follow a path into the woods to pick up the trail again. This 2.5 mile trail meanders down from the High Point back to the trail junction where you met it the first time. There are several steep and rocky areas to negotiate. Along the way there is at least one prominent path leading northwest but seemingly into nowhere. When the trail bends sharply to the left you can head southwest on a bushwhack which is steep in many places but will cut some distance off your return trip. Back at the trail junction it is only a matter of following the main trail back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the loop hiking route.)

ashokanhplaloop_pro

(The image shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Ashokan High Point and Little Ashokan: Kanape Brook Out and Backnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 8.5 mi. 2717 ft. GPSies

ashokanhplaone_map Park at the Kanape Brook PA trailhead on the Peekamoose Road. Walk across the road and toward the Ashokan to pick up the trail. The first 2.7 miles is a rather gentle uphill walk. Much of the first part of the trail parallels Kanape Brook which can be heard as you walk along the trail. Several small bridges and culverts cross tributaries which increase the volume of the brook. The trail here is a wide road typical of logging or quarrying roads that run throughout the Catskills. At the 2.7 mile mark make a pronounced left. The trail now narrows to a footpath but is marked and well-worn. You are immediately faced with a choice! The trail straight ahead continues upward fro about 1 mile to the Ashokan High Point. This trail gains about 1000 feet over the mile and there are several steep areas. Most of these areas have stone steps which make the climb easier. The trail to the left is longer but generally easier to climb. Once at the High Point itself you have a beautiful view of the mountains and valleys directly to the east. Depending on the foliage cover, you may be able to see a hint of the reservoir a little farther north or to the left as you gaze from the lookout. From the High Point you may be able to see a path directly down between some of the rocks or a path further on leading down. This is the way to Little Ashokan High Point. The walk is about .5 miles and there is drop of about 350 feet to the lowest point before climbing back up to Little Ashokan. Whether or not you can find the path is not too important. just walk in the general direction and watch for the numerous steep areas and actual cliffs. Little Ashokan is filled with blueberry and huckleberry bushes which can make walking interesting unless you are on show shoes. Near the highest point are several flat rocks that make a good viewpoint back to the High Point and over to the Mombaccus-Little Rocky ridge. Dropping down a little to some lower paths and walking around to the left offers some more views but the reservoir is hard to see unless the leaves are off the trees. Views may be possible but unobstructed views for photography are few. After wandering around some, head back to the High Point more or less the way you came. From the High Point continue on the main trail. In a short distance on the left you may get some views in a small clearing. A little farther to the north and west the trail opens into several fields and can become hard to follow. Some visitors have built a fire circle surrounded by stone chairs. Walking to the north and east side of the field gives you a view of the Ashokan Reservoir. The view is NOT clear and is blocked by trees making the best viewing times when the leaves are not on the trees. Turning your gaze a little more to the north and west reveals the Burrough’s Range with the unmistakable outline of Wittenberg, Cornell, and Slide Mountains. After taking in the view, turn around and retrace your steps following the route you took on the ascent back to your car at the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

ashokanhplaone_pro

(The image shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bald Mt (Stamford)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 4.5 mi. 953 ft. GPSies

baldmtstamford_map From the junction of Routes 23 and 10 in Stamford, drive .9 miles north on Route 10 to Archibald Field on the right. Park in the first parking area. To begin the hike walk to the gravel road just south of the parking area and turn left heading east. Soon you will cross a stream on a footbridge where the fun really begins. There are many trails in this area and all are blazed but there are no maps which makes the blazes useless. All is not lost as you want to hike “east and up”. There are several different routes to the top with some being longer and others shorter. It seems that all these routes converge on one final trail that approaches the summit from the west. Just before the summit there is a nice lookout on the left which has excellent views to the north. As you reach the top of Bald Mountain you will see some old buildings and the remains of a chair lift. At one time this mountain was home to the Deer Run Ski Area which is no longer in operation. Explore the summit which as at least a 180 degree view before returning to the parking area. It may interest you to return by a slightly different route than the one you used to ascend.

(The map shows the parking area and one possible hiking route.)

baldmtstamford_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Balsam Lake Mt to Alder Lakenew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.8 mi. 2630 ft. GPSies

balsamalder_map Park at the trailhead at the end of the Beaverkill Road. The public road dead ends at this spot and a private road continues to the Balsam Lake Lodge. There are several choices to make when climbing this mountain. Find the blue-blazed Dry Brook Ridge Trail and hike about .9 miles. At this point turn left on the red-blazed Balsam Lake Trail. The climb is rather steep but after about .85 miles you will be at the summit. As you climb, you will see the trail to the Balsam Lake Mt lean-to on the left after about .5 miles. Walk another .1 miles and there will be an obvious piped spring on the right. Just above the spring the trail levels. Continue for another .2 miles and you will see the yellow-blazed Millbrook Ridge Trail to Alder Lake on the left. Continue for another .15 miles to the fire tower. The fire tower at the top offers a spectacular view in all directions. Balsam Lake Mountain is the westernmost in the Catskill Park and the tower offers an unhindered 360 degree view. Thirty-three of the other 34 peaks are visible with only Thomas Cole, hiding behind Hunter Mt., out of view. Turn back on the Balsam Lake Mt. trail to the Millbrook Ridge Trail and turn right. This trail descends for a while and then ascends again. After 1.95 miles there is a lookout over Beecher Lake. There is a Zen Monastery on the shore. In another 1.1 miles including a short climb you will be at the highest point on the ridge. The elevation here is 3480 feet which means that it is one large boulder away from being another Catskill 35! In 1.35 miles you will be at the Beaver Meadow lean-to and spring. Several of these “beaver meadows” can be found along the trail and they all offer a home to a variety of wildlife. A walk of about 1.5 miles will bring you to the red-blazed Alder Lake Trail. Turn left or right and walk .8 miles to the Alder Lake parking area. At Alder Lake you can reverse your steps and hike back to Balsam Lake. This makes for a LONG 15 mile hike. It may be more enjoyable to hike with a friend and leave a car at both trailheads. You could, of course, reverse this hike which would give a slightly different perspective. At Alder Lake be sure to look at the remains of the mansion built by shipping tycoon Samuel Coykendall. New York State recently removed all but the stonework after determining it would be impossible to restore the once stately edifice.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

balsamalder_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Balsam Lake Mt and Vly Pondnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.5 mi. 2900 ft. GPSies

balsamvly_map Park at the trailhead at the end of the Beaverkill Road. The public road dead ends at this spot and a private road continues to the Balsam Lake Lodge. There are several choices to make when climbing this mountain. Find the blue-blazed Dry Brook Ridge Trail and hike about .9 miles. At this point turn left on the red-blazed Balsam Lake Trail. The climb is rather steep but after about .85 miles you will be at the summit. As you climb, you will see the trail to the Balsam Lake Mt lean-to on the left after about .5 miles. Walk another .1 miles and there will be an obvious piped spring on the right. Just above the spring the trail levels. Continue for another .2 miles and you will see the yellow-blazed Millbrook Ridge Trail to Alder Lake on the left. Continue for another .15 miles to the fire tower. The fire tower at the top offers a spectacular view in all directions. Balsam Lake Mountain is the westernmost in the Catskill Park and the tower offers an unhindered 360 degree view. Thirty-three of the other 34 peaks are visible with only Thomas Cole, hiding behind Hunter Mt., out of view. Continue your hike down the back side of Balsam Lake. At the trail junction turn right to return to your car. DO NOT get in your car. Walk to the other side of the parking area and pick up the Hardenburgh Trail to Vly Pond.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

balsamvly_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)

Bear Spring: Central Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 9.3 mi. 1600 ft. GPSies

bearspringcentral_map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot. Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Turn onto East Trout Brook Road and drive south. Pass Launt Pond on your right and then drive 1.3 miles further. Park on the left side of the road in the parking area. Cross the road to get on Trial 4 to the Fork Mountain ridge. The trail rises 750 feet from the road to the ridge over 1.2 miles. At the top of the ridge turn right or northwest to hike along the Fork Mountain Ridge. A little more than 2 miles into the hike and you will be at the first of three clear cut areas on the hike. No one has been able to tell me the reason for theses clear cuts but they are all done with state approval. The trail continues northwest over a few bumps and at 3.3 miles into the hike you cross West Trout Brook Road to continue on the trail. Continue almost directly north now toward Route 206 and cross the road again to walk through the main parking area. Follow the trail through the woods and out across a field. Look for the opening directly across the field. The trail parallels Route 206, crosses East Trout Brook Road and then ascends slightly before dropping to Wilson Hollow Road. This woods road is a grassy track and has never been paved but shows up on many maps with the same prominence as Route 206! At this point you will be at were at the second and largest clear cut area. Follow Wilson Hollow Road along the large clear cut area before the road entered the woods. Watch for Trail 11 on the right at about 6.8 miles into the hike. This trail leads back down to East Trout Brook Road and to another trail that will take you back to your car. It is an alternative route. Continue on the main trail/road passing another trail down within .6 miles of Trail 11. Continue to the McCoy Hill Shortcut at 7.7 miles. This trail turns right and runs along the edge of a field before descending through the forest to the last clear cut. Watch for a short path to the right that leads to a small field with a view over the clear cut and across to Fork Mountain. A little further down another trail comes in from the left. Stay on the main trail passing a pond and two final trail junctions before arriving at Middle Pond on East Trout Brook. Walk over the bridge and up to your car,.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly clockwise direction.)

bearspringcentral_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: East Trout Brook Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.3 mi. 1262 ft. GPSies

bearspringeasttrout_map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot. Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Turn right on East trout Brook Road and drive south. Pass Launt pond on your right and then drive 1.3 miles further. Park on the left side of the road in the parking area. Walk down the wide path/road and across the dam that creates a small pond. Continue straight ahead up the hill on the wide grassy snowmobile/horse trail. The trail climbs steadily now toward the ridge. At .35 miles a trail marked “New Trail” comes in on the left. Continue straight ahead to .68 miles. You will be in an area that has been clear cut, one of several in the park. Turn right and continue climbing until the trail junction at 1.23 miles. Turn left up the hill to the ridge. The climb ends at 1.61 miles into the hike. The trail now “rolls” along the ridge and starts a turn from east to northwest at about 1.85 miles. At 3.0 miles pass by a turn to the left through a field. This trail leads back to the trail junction at the base of the clear cut and is a good “early out”. Continue to 3.33 miles and turn left down another wide trail. This trail initially heads south but them goes through a switchback that again turns northwest. The trail loses 715 feet to a parking area on East Trout Brook Road at 4.6 miles. You can walk the road south from here to your car. Make a sharp left turn onto a trail marked “New Trail” to avoid the road walk. This trail heads southeast for 1.3 miles until it reaches the trail junction at 5.9 miles you passed earlier. The trail is longer than the road walk and does ascend briefly in a few spots. Turn right and walk back to the dam and across the top to your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

bearspringeasttrout_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Eastern Trailsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.6 mi. 1253 ft. GPSies

bearspringeast_map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot. Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Park in the large pull off on the left hand side of the road just before the turn onto East Trout Brook Road. To start the hike, walk up the road to a wide woods road with a gate on your left. This is Wilson Hollow Road which is also Trail 2 on the horse trails map of the area. As you walk in on this wide trail, you will immediacies notice a clear cut area extending more than half a mile on your left. The trail will continue to rise a little as you walk with no steep uphill or downhill section. in the first 3 miles. At 1.3 miles Trail 11 will enter from the right as it climbs the ridge from just south of Launt Pond on East Trout Brook Road. At 2.3 miles Trail 3 joins from the right. This is where you will return after the loop. At this point the trail descends a little and then climbs slightly. Along the way the trail heads more to the southeast and a snowmobile trail comes in on the left from Downsville. Soon the trail begins to head down until at around 4 miles Trail 12 comes in from the left. Continue to bear to the right and follow Trail 2 as it continues to the lowest point on the hike, the junction with Trail 3 at 4.5 miles. Turn right here on Trail 3 to walk back up to the ridge to the area you passed earlier. At this point in the hike you may think you are in the wrong place but what your are looking at is ANOTHER clear cut area. After the turn Trail 3 climbs to a field that looks down over the clear cut area but also looks down the hollow for some good photographic opportunities. Continue on Trail 3 until it meets Trail 2 back on the ridge about 5.3 miles into the hike. Turn left and follow Wilson Hollow Road for the next 2.3 miles back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly clockwise direction.)

bearspringeast_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Eastern Trails (Clockwise)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.6 mi. 1053 ft. GPSies

bearspringeastclock_map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot. Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Park in the large pull off on the left hand side of the road just before the turn onto East Trout Brook Road. To start the hike, walk up the road to a wide woods road with a gate on your left. This is Wilson Hollow Road which is also Trail 2 on the horse trails map of the area. As you walk in on this wide trail, you will immediacies notice a clear cut area extending more than half a mile on your left. The trail will continue to rise a little as you walk with no steep uphill or downhill section. in the first 3 miles. At 1.3 miles Trail 11 will enter from the right as it climbs the ridge from just south of Launt Pond on East Trout Brook Road. At 2.3 miles Trail 3 joins from the right. Turn to the right here and walk along the edge of the field until the trail enters the woods. At this point the trail descends almost 500 feet to the lowest point on the hike. On the way down the trail there is a nice lookout into the valley below. At the bottom of the descent turn left to start to loop around and back up to the ridge heading mostly east. Of course, the payment for a descent is an ascent back to the ridge. In just about a mile you will regain the elevation you lost on the way down. Along the way you will pass a sign on a snowmobile trail to the right that says “Downsville”. Continu to walk the woods road east. At about 4.2 miles the trail turns northwest to circle the summit of a hill on your left and head back toward the parking area. From the point of the turn back to the trail junction where you turned right earlier is about 1.15 miles. When you arrive back at the junction, you will know exactly how far you have to go to get back! The hike back along Wilson Hollow road is 2.2 miles and is mostly downhill.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

bearspringeastclock_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Eastern Trails from trailheadnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.6 mi. 1253 ft. GPSies

bearspringeastth_map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot. Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Turn onto West Trout Brook Road and park at the main trailhead parking on the left hand side of the road. To start the hike, get on the trail just to the left of the information kiosk. These trails are for horseback riding and are not marked like hiking trails.Continue on this trail through a field and down a hill to where the trail crosses East Trout Brook Road. Continue across and bear left where the trail splits. Ascend a hill to another trail junction on the other side. Turn left and walk down the hill to a woods road. This is Wilson Hollow Road which is also Trail 2 on the horse trails map of the area. As you walk in on this wide trail, you will immediacies notice a clear cut area extending more than half a mile on your left. The trail will continue to rise a little as you walk with no steep uphill or downhill section. in the first 3 miles. At 2.25 miles Trail 11 will enter from the right as it climbs the ridge from just south of Launt Pond on East Trout Brook Road. At 3.1 miles Trail 3 joins from the right. Turn here and skirt the edge of a field before entering the woods and heading downhill. For .8 miles the trail loses 460 feet to the lowest point on the hike. Another clearcut area will appear on the right as you near the end of this section. There are some nice vies down the valley. At the bottom of the hill turn left and start to climb back up to the ridge. In a little more than half a mile the trail splits and you should continue by bearing left up to the ridge. The trail makes an abrupt change in direction from east to northwest and at 6.3 miles you will be back to where you started the loop. Follow Wilson Hollow Road back almost to Route 206. Turn left up the hill and follow your route back to the main trailhead.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise out and back direction.)

bearspringeastth_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Launt Pond Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.9 mi. 1027 ft. GPSies

bearspringlauntloop_map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot. Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Turn onto West Trout Brook Road and park at the main trailhead parking on the left hand side of the road. To start the hike, get on the trail just to the left of the information kiosk. These trails are for horseback riding and are not marked like hiking trails.Continue on this trail through a field and down a hill to where the trail crosses East Trout Brook Road. Continue across and bear left where the trail splits. Ascend a hill to another trail junction on the other side. Turn left and walk down the hill to a woods road. This is Wilson Hollow Road which is also Trail 2 on the horse trails map of the area. As you walk in on this wide trail, you will immediacies notice a clear cut area extending more than half a mile on your left. The trail will continue to rise a little as you walk with no steep uphill or downhill section. in the first 3 miles. At 2.25 miles Trail 11 will enter from the right as it climbs the ridge from just south of Launt Pond on East Trout Brook Road. At 2.85 miles another woods road joins from the right. Turn right here walk down the trail to a nearly 180 degree turn at 3.0 miles. As you continue on this trail, a break in the trees on the left reveals another clearcut area. The trail ends, after 1.4 miles and a drop of 550 feet, at a parking area on East Trout Brook Road just south of Launt Pond. Turn right and walk .3 miles up to the pond. This is a favorite picnic and boating area during the season. Head back out to the road and turn left. Walk about a mile north on the road and gain around 300 feet. As you near Route 206, you will see the trail that you used to cross the road earlier in the hike. Turn left and follow your path from earlier back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise out and back direction.)

bearspringlauntloop_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Launt Pond Loop from 206 new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 4.0 mi. 630 ft. GPSies

bearspringlaunt206_map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked for hiking. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot. Take County Route 206 to nearly the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Pull off the road to the large parking area on the left just before East Trout Brook Road. To start the hike, walk west along the shoulder of Route 206 to the woods road or trail on the left. This is Wilson Hollow Road which is also Trail 2 on the horse trails map of the area. As you walk in on this wide trail, you will immediately notice a clear cut area extending more than half a mile on your left. The trail will continue to rise a little as you walk with no steep uphill or downhill section. At around 1.3 miles Trail 11 will be on the right as it climbs the ridge from just south of Launt Pond on East Trout Brook Road.Turn right on this trail and descend 430 feet over the next .7 miles to a parking area on East Trout Brook Road. Turn right on the road and hike .3 miles north to Launt Pond. The pond has a dam at the outlet end and is a pretty spot to stop in any season. During the summer, there is a beach for swimming and canoe and kayak rental. Across the road from the pond is a camping area. After looking around, get back on the road and walk 1 mile north where the trail crosses just short of Route 206. Turn right on the trail and stay left at the fork. Walk over a hill and down the other side to Wilson Hollow Road. Turn left and walk back out to your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the clockwise hiking route.)
bearspringlaunt206_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Northeastern Trailsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagit 6.0 mi. 1100 ft. GPSies

bearspringnortheast_map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot. This hike is the result of some wandering. Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Turn into the park on West Bear trout Brook Road which is the main entrance. Only a few hundred feet in there will be a large trail head parking area on the left. There is a large hand-painted wooden sign that shows the numbers horse trails. Memorize it since the copies, if there are any, at he trail junctions are useless. Note also that there are many additional trails and roads that form loops and are not shown on any maps. Exit the parking area on the trail to the left of the sign which should be Trail 2. Almost immediately you will be at an open field with no clues where to go. Walk straight across the field to the trail on the other side. At .5 miles you will cross East Trout Brook Road and immediately be confronted with three possible trails. Bear to the left and up the hill. At 1.0 mile there will be a trail junction which is almost a T with no signs. Turn right to continue with this description or left which is the “correct” way to go. Bearing left the trail ascends to the top of a little plateau with open forest. The trail heads southwest but then turns northwest and descends right back to East Trout Brook Road. Walk .8 miles down the road to Launt Pond. Although this is a road walk the pond is beautiful and well worth the trip. Launt Pond is not on any of the main trails but can be reached by spur trails. After spending some time at the pond, walk down the road about .3 miles to the next big parking area on the left. Just before the parking area enter the woods on Trail 11. Trail 11 winds back and forth but travels mostly east and up to meet Wilson Hollow Road which is part of Trail 2. Turn left or north and follow the wide road for about 1.2 miles at which point you will be within sight of Route 206. As you approach this area you will see a large clear cut area on the left. Turn left up the hill and make the first right. If this looks familiar, it should. This is the area where you made a short loop earlier. Head back to the parking area on Trail 2 which is only 1`.1 miles away. Other loops are possible using Trail 2 which extends much farther south.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

bearspringnortheast_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Ridge Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 8.9 mi. 1447 ft. GPSies

Bear Spring (Ridge Loop)_map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot. Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. At the top of the hill turn onto West Trout Brook Road and drive south a short distance to the large parking area on the left. Walk just less than a mile south on West Trout Brook Road and turn left onto the trail that runs over Fork Mountain. This is the central ridge of the three at the park and serves as part of the Finger Lakes Trail. The walk SSE on the trail for another 2.4 miles until Trail 4 turns left off the ridge. The walk along the ridge rolls some but does not gain or lose much elevation. Trail 4 is steep and drops 655 feet in less than a mile. The trail ends at East Trout Brook Road. Cross the road to the parking lot and then walk down the trail to Middle Pond. Approach Middle Pond quietly as you may spot a blue heron, a beaver or other wildlife. Walk straight ahead and up the hill on the trail. At 4.6 miles a trail appears on the left but you should continue up the hill to 4.9 miles where the trail splits. Notice the large clear cut area on the left as there are several in the area. Keep to the left to take the McCoy Hill Cutoff to the top of the eastern ridge. There is at least one viewpoint along the way and at 5.7 miles you will walk through a field to meet the trail along the eastern ridge. Turn left on this trail and walk along the ridge. At 6.0 miles a wide woods road heads back down off the ridge to East Trout Brook Road. Further along at 6.6 miles, another trail heads down to the camping area at Launt Pond. Continue straight ahead and at 7.2 miles another large clear cut area will appear on your right. Another clear cut is visible on the hillside across Route 206. At 7.8 miles turn right and walk up a short hill. Bear right at the first form and walk up a little and then down to East Trout Brook Road. The final .4 miles is uphill and crosses a large field before you are back at the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

Bear Spring (Ridge Loop)_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Southeastern Trailsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagit 6.2 mi. 1475 ft. GPSies

bearspringsoutheast_map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot. This hike is the result of some wandering. Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Turn onto East Trout Brook Road which is a paved road that connects to Trout Brook Road and Route 30 at Shinhopple. Drive south on the road for about 2.2 miles passing Launt Pond on your right. Park at the roadside pulloff near Middle Pond. There will be a dam and bridge at the outlet of the pond which will allow you to cross East Trout Brook. You may also drive north on Trout Brook Road from Route 30 in Shinhopple. Bear right where West and East Trout Brook Roads separate. The parking area will be about 2.2 miles from where the roads diverge. It may be possible to park at the large parking area where the two roads separate but crossing East Trout Brook in this area on Trail 8 can be difficult in all but the driest times. There is no bridge! After crossing the bridge at Middle Pond turn right and follow Trail 8 as it roughly parallels the creek.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)
bearspringsoutheast_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Trail 4new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 1.9 mi. 690 ft. GPSies

bearspringtrail4_map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot. Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY and watch for East Trout Brook Road on your left. Turn left on East Trout Brook Road heading south and passing Launt Pond on your right. After 2.2 miles park on the left side of the road in the parking area near Middle Pond. Cross the road and head up Trail 4 to the junction with Trail 5 on the ridge. UP is the operative word since Trail 4 is pro ably the steepest trail in the park. It only gains 690 feet but it does so in about 1 mile. Ignore the trail head signs that say .6 miles since a careful inspection will show this is “as the crow flies”. The trail is steep with some very steep sections and near the top there is a switchback on the horse trail. Just before the junction with Trail 5 on the ridge is a sharp right turn. Once you are on top you can simply walk back to the car or make this part of a longer or MUCH longer loop.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)
bearspringtrail4_pro

(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Trout Brooknew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 3.7 mi. 527 ft. GPSies

bearspringtrout_map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot. Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY and watch for East Trout Brook Road on your left. Turn left on East Trout Brook Road heading south and passing Launt Pond on your right. After 2.2 miles park on the left side of the road in the parking area near Middle Pond. Walk down to the dam and then turn right on the trail. The trail parallels Trout Creek for most of its length but moves away through fields and forest in places. The trail can be very wet at times. Walk as far as you like and then turn around to return. There are a number of ways to extend the distance and difficulty of the hike.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)
bearspringtrout_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Bear Spring: Western Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 12.2 mi. 2100 ft. GPSies

bearspringwest_map Caution: The trails at Bear Spring State Park are primarily constructed for horses and snowmobiles. The wide well-kept trails are easy to walk but poorly marked. You cannot really get lost but you can wander around a lot. Take County Route 206 to the top of Bear Spring Mountain near Walton, NY. Turn into the park on West Bear trout Brook Road which is the main entrance. Only a few hundred feet in there will be a large trail head parking area on the left. There is a large hand-painted wooden sign that shows the numbers horse trails. Memorize it since the copies, if there are any, at he trail junctions are useless. Note also that there are many additional trails and roads that form loops and are not shown on any maps. Exit the parking area on the trail across the road which should be Trail 7. Within .5 miles you will cross Beers Brook Road and the trail continues on the other side as it parallels West Trout Brook Road. The trail is wide open and grassy and wanders back and forth across the ridge and generally gains a little elevation. At 1.1 miles the trail bears to the right and continues until it meets the trail to the Houck Mountain towers at about 2.2 miles. Turn left and walk a short distance to the next junction and turn right staying on the horse trail marked with the blue horse trail markers. There are few markers that designate the trail numbers and at some point Trail 7 changes to Trail 6 at least according to the sign back at trail head. As you walk along the ridge for the next 3.25 miles to the south and then southeast, you may begin to wonder if you are going the right way. At the and of the ridge the trail starts to descend for about .45 miles to a switchback almost 6 miles into the hike! After the switchback, walk about .8 miles to the next switchback and then another ,5 miles to West Trout Brook Road. You will be about 7.3 miles into the hike and will have dropped almost 1000 feet from the ridge. Cross the road and walk a little to the right to continue on Trail 6. Now its time to regain that 1000 feet you dropped! From the road the trail ascends briefly and then drops through a stand of spruce trees before climbing again to a trail junction within .35 miles of the road. Finally a trail that is clearly marked! Turn left on Trail 5 and start to climb over 900 feet for the next 1.3 miles. After this there are still some ups and downs but the trail remains relatively flat as it passes Fork Mountain at 9.5 miles into the hike. At 10 miles the trail starts to descend. Along the trail at about 10.4 miles you will pass a clear cut area to the left of the trail. Somewhere around 11 miles Trail 5 ends at West Trout Brook Road. You can walk the road back to the car or cross over to get back on Trail 7 and retrace your earlier route back to the car which is only a mile away.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly anticlockwise direction.)

bearspringwest_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Beaverkill Headwaters from Wild Meadow Roadnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.7 mi. 643 ft. GPSies

Beaverkill Headwaters_map As you walk the first part of this route you will hear the waters of Fall Brook flowing roughly south. Once you get to the wetlands near the end the water will start to flow west with water feeding in from runoff from Doubletop. The headwaters of the Beaverkill are a little further north on the slopes of this mountain. The trail where it meets the Beaverkill has been eroded and crossing can be challenging even in drier weather. Park at the end of Black Bear Road (Wild Meadow Road) in the snowplow turnaround ass long as there is no snow! Walk down the road which serves as the beginning of the yellow Neversink Hardenburgh Trail in this area. Walk by the hunting camp and continue on the trail on the other side. The trail can be very wet in places. Cross over a brook and head up a little gaining some elevation. The Fall Brook lean-to is about 1.7 miles into the hike. After passing the lean-to, a swampy area appeared on the right of the trail which leads into a series of beaver ponds and beaver meadows. Doubletop Mountain is in the background. This area is the headwaters of Fall Brook which runs south and the Beaverkill which runs north and west. The trail parallels the Beaverkill for a short distance and then ENDS at the edge of the stream. Linger for some time to take some pictures and dip a toe in one of the best trout streams in the United States. When you are done, turn around and retrace your route to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

Beaverkill Headwaters_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Belleayre Mt: Ski Area from Lost Clovenew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.7 mi. 2245 ft. GPSies

belleayre_mapGet on Route 47, the road that runs from Big Indian on Route 28 to Claryville. Turn onto Lost Clove Road just outside the village of Big Indian. Continue for 1.5 miles on Lost Clove Road until the designated parking area on the right. The road dead ends just after this. Walk straight ahead from the parking area onto the red blazed trail. This trail is an easement on private land so stay on the trail at all times. The trail climbs 1300 feet in the next 1.3 miles! It is very steep at times and just steep at others. The trail does follow an old woods road for most of its length which makes the going easier. Some areas have loose stone which makes the footing tricky. After 1.3 miles the trail enters the forest preserve and shortly after that ends at the blue blazed Pine Hill West Branch Trail. Turn left on this trail. The walking gets easier and a lean-to will be on the right after only .3 miles. Continue passed the lean-to for about .5 miles to the summit of Belleayre Mountain. At this point the Pine Hill West Branch trail turns south toward Balsam Mountain. Walk over the summit, through the field and slightly to your right, and pick up the red blazed Belleayre Ridge Trail. After about .3 miles, there is another lean-to on the right. Just before the lean-to the Cathedral Glen Trail turns to the right. This trail leads down through the ski slopes to the railroad tracks in Pine Hill. Continue straight ahead on the Belleayre Ridge Trail. The signs for the various ski slopes will start to appear and then ahead will be the lifts and Sunset Lodge. You can continue straight ahead and walk all the way out to Deer Run, the last lift and ski slope on the ridge. Along the way enjoy the view down the slopes into the valley and across to the opposite hills. Be sure to walk around to the “front” of the lodge which offers a nice view of Balsam Mountain. return be retracing the path you used to ascend the mountain.

(The map shows the parking area and the out-and-back hiking route.)

belleayre_pro
(The image is the vertical profile for the out and back hike.)


Big Pond: Around the Pondnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 3.8 mi. 750 ft. GPSies

bigpond_map Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the junction of Beaverkill Road and Barkaboom Road. Turn left toward the Little Pond Campgrounds. Continue passed the turn to the campgrounds on the left. Watch for a sign for the parking area for Big Pond on the right. If you get to Big Pond, you should turn around and take the first turn on the left!. Park in the parking area and look for the trail register. The trail is poorly marked in places so keep an eye out for the trail markers at all times. When thee trail ahead starts the first climb turn off to the left and begin to bushwhack around the pond. On the north end and west side you will find some woods roads that lead out to Barkaboom Road. You may walk the road back to the car or walk back into the woods.

(The map shows the parking area and the out-and-back hiking route.)
bigpond_pro
(The image above shows the profile of the hike. The highest point is the summit of Touch-Me-Not Mountain. The lowest spot is the junction of the Barkaboom and Beaverkill Roads.)


Big Pond to Alder Lakenew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.3 mi. 1530 ft. GPSies

bigpondalder_mapTake the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the junction of Beaverkill Road and Barkaboom Road. Turn left toward the Little Pond Campgrounds. Continue passed the turn to the campgrounds on the left. Watch for a sign for the parking area for Big Pond on the right. If you get to Big Pond, you should turn around and take the first turn on the left!. Park in the parking area and look for the trail register. The trail is poorly marked in places so keep an eye out for the trail markers at all times. There are some short climbs but the trail skirts most of the tops of the hills. Once you get to Alder Creek Road you may turn around or extend the hike by walking over to Alder Lake. You may even decide to walk around the lake and beyond!

(The map shows the parking area and the out-and-back hiking route.)
bigpondalder_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. The highest point is the summit of Touch-Me-Not Mountain. The lowest spot is the junction of the Barkaboom and Beaverkill Roads.)


Big Pond to Cabot Mt (road loop)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.0 mi. 1605 ft. GPSies

biglittle_map Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the intersection with Barkaboom Rd. Drive up the Barkaboom Rd for less than a mile and park at the forest preserve parking area. Walk down the access road and up Barkaboom Road for a short distance. The trail begins on the left and this is where the register is located. In the summer of 2006, there was a sign warning that the trail was closed at the other end. After bushwhacking the Catskill 35’s, I didn’t think this would be much of a problem and I never found the “closed” trail. After another .75 miles, you reach the top of Touch-Me-Not Mountain. At this point turn right and stay on the red blazed trail. After .5 miles this intersects with the yellow blazed Little Pond Trail. Stay on the red trail and get ready to climb! Cabot Mt is only 2970′ high but the ascent is somewhat steep. The Beaverkill Vista gives a beautiful if somewhat restricted view of the Beaverkill valley. Turn around and descend Cabot. This time turn left on the Little Pond Trail which leads to the campground access road. Follow this road out to the bathrooms and main buildings. At this point you may take the blue Campground Trail 1.15 miles until it meets the red Touch-Me-Not Trail. Retrace your steps back to your car at Big Pond. You may also walk .85 miles out the Little Pond Campgrounds access road and turn left on Barkaboom Road. After .5 miles you will be back at the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route.)
biglittle_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. The highest point is the summit of Cabot Mountain. The lowest spot is the junction of the access road and Barkaboom Road.)


Big Pond to Cabot Mt (trail loop)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.6 mi. (east side of Little Pond) 6.6 mi. (west side of Little Pond) 2260 ft. GPSies

bigpondcabottouch_map Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the intersection with Barkaboom Rd. Drive up the Barkaboom Rd for less than a mile and park at the forest preserve parking area. Walk down the access road and up Barkaboom Road for a short distance. The trail begins on the left and this is where the register is located. In the summer of 2006, there was a sign warning that the trail was closed at the other end. After bushwhacking the Catskill 35’s, I didn’t think this would be much of a problem and I never found the “closed” trail. After another .75 miles, you reach the top of Touch-Me-Not Mountain. At this point turn right and stay on the red blazed trail. After .5 miles this intersects with the yellow blazed Little Pond Trail. Stay on the red trail and get ready to climb! Cabot Mt is only 2970′ high but the ascent is somewhat steep. The Beaverkill Vista gives a beautiful if somewhat restricted view of the Beaverkill Valley with Little Pond below. Turn around and descend Cabot. Turn right on the Little Pond Trail which leads to the campgrounds. Along the way there is a nice viewpoint about a quarter mile after the trail junction. The field has an old foundation and a small pond. I always think this would be a great place to have a cabin except for the long hike to get there! As you descend from this viewpoint there may be a few small streams to cross. There is also a beaver meadow on the left of the trail. When you get to the Loop Trail around Little Pond, you may turn left or right. Turning to the right allows you to circle Little Pond and adds .2 miles to the trip. Follow the loop trail to the bathrooms and main buildings. At this point find the blue Campground Trail behind the bathrooms. This trail is steep in places as it climbs back up TouchMeNot Mountain for about 1.15 miles until it meets the red Touch-Me-Not Trail. Turn right and retrace your steps back to your car at Big Pond. From the bathrooms you may also walk .85 miles out the Little Pond Campgrounds access road and turn left on Barkaboom Road. After .5 miles you will be back at the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route.)
bigpondcabottouch_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. The highest point is the summit of Cabot Mountain.)


Big Pond to Touchmenot Mtnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 2.4 mi. 916 ft. GPSies

bigtouch_map Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the intersection with Barkaboom Rd. Drive up the Barkaboom Rd for less than a mile and park at the forest preserve parking area. Walk down the access road and up Barkaboom Road for a short distance. The trail begins on the left and this is where the register is located. In the summer of 2006, there was a sign warning that the trail was closed at the other end. After bushwhacking the Catskill 35’s, I didn’t think this would be much of a problem and I never found the “closed” trail. After another .75 miles, you reach the top of Touch-Me-Not Mountain. At this point turn right and stay on the red blazed trail. After .5 miles this intersects with the yellow blazed Little Pond Trail. Stay on the red trail and get ready to climb! Cabot Mt is only 2970′ high but the ascent is somewhat steep. The Beaverkill Vista gives a beautiful if somewhat restricted view of the Beaverkill valley. Turn around and descend Cabot. This time turn left on the Little Pond Trail which leads to the campground access road. Follow this road out to the bathrooms and main buildings. At this point you may take the blue Campground Trail 1.15 miles until it meets the red Touch-Me-Not Trail. Retrace your steps back to your car at Bog Pond. You may also walk .85 miles out the Little Pond Campgrounds access road and turn left on Barkaboom Road. After .5 miles you will be back at the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

bigtouch_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike.)


Bramley Mountain (Glen Burnie Road)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 2.9 mi. 920 ft. GPSies

bramley_mapFrom Delhi, NY head north and east on Route 10. In East Delhi cross the river at the Fitches Covered Bridge and turn left on County Route 18. After about 2 miles turn right on Glen Burnie Road and start to look for DEP signs. After a little over .5 miles there will be a woods road on the left with a gate and some room to pull over on the side of the road. DO NOT park here and take this road. Drive a little further and you will find found another woods road with another pulloff on the left. This woods road will lead almost directly to the summit of Bramley Mountain. Follow the road fro about 1.1 miles and you will find that if you continue straight ahead the road will skirt the summit. You will have to bushwhack to your left to get to the summit. The prickers here can be rather thick at times! When you run into some cliffs find a way through them and walk the short distance to the summit. You will find the piers for the firetower are still in place and a USGS marker is located nearby. Walk south to s lookout with limited views. When you are ready, return the way you came.

(The map shows the parking area and the one way hiking route.)

bramley_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Brock Mountain to Berry Brook Rdnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.4 mi. 1824 ft. GPSies

brock_mapThis is a one way hike that requires a car shuttle or you will have to double the distance. Another option is to have someone pick you up at the other end. Head out of Roscoe on Route 206. Turn right on Berry Brook Road just after the county line and drive for around 8 miles to the trail head parking on the right. Drop one car here and continue on Berry Brook Road to Route 30 on the Pepacton Reservoir. Turn left and continue around the reservoir to the junction with Route 206/Route 7. Turn left and drive 2.2 miles to a small parking area on the right side of the road. Park here and cross the road to pick up the blue-blazed Campbell Mountain Trail. The trail is a wide woods road at the beginning and stays this way for most of its length. There is an immediate ascent through hardwood forest. Hiking this trail can be a real pain or a great pleasure depending on the trail maintenance. This trail is part of the Finger Lakes Trail system and is maintained by their volunteers. Blowdowns can be a problem but the bigger problem is the dense stands of prickers that can obscure the trail. For the first .5 miles the trail gains 450 feet with a few short but steep climbs. After that, it goes through the first of several switchbacks to give hikers a rest before gaining another 230 feet over the next .4 miles. At about 1 mile you reach the false summit of Brock Mountain which, on many maps and GPS units, is marked as Brock Mountain. In this area you may begin to notice piles of rock that do not look natural. There is a rather large quarry off the trail to the left. You may be able to find a woods road that leads to it but the bushwhack is easy. You will see piles of rock and a large and deep pit. When you have explored, work your way back up out of the pit and back to the trail. Back on the trail it is time to tackle the rest of the ascent up the “real” Brock Mountain. After a slight descent from the false summit, the trail ascends about 300 feet to the top of Brock Mountain at about 1.9 miles into the hike. The trail does not actually pass over the highest point on the mountain where there is purported to be a USGS benchmark but it tops out at about 2440 feet. As you start down the other side of Brock Mountain there will be a rather steep descent. Many of the trees are dead and this allows for some interesting views of the valley with another ridge beyond. Continue the hike over trail but be careful to pay close attention to where you are hiking! There are numerous paths and woods roads that cut across the main trail and the trail markers can be few and far between. At about 2.4 miles the trail heads north and then southeast after a short distance. This prominent switchback is not shown on the NYNJTC maps and can be a little confusing. At 3 miles the trail turns almost 90 degrees to the right and heads northeast. Shortly after this, at 3.3 miles, there is another 90 degrees turn to the right and the trail heads southeast. In both cases there are snowmobile trails or woods roads in the area of the turns. There are really no views along the way but the woods can be pretty in any season. In some places there are stone walls and the hint of a foundation. At 3.85 there is another 90 degree turn to the right onto an old road which is eroded but very recognizable with stone walls on both sides. The is a slight uphill but the trail is mostly level for the next .3 miles. At this point the Campbell Mountain Trail ends. To the right is the Little Spring Brook Trail that leads out to Route 206. Turn left onto the Pelnor Hollow Trail. In the next 1 mile the trail climbs over 400 feet through mixed hardwood and evergreen forest. There are some steeper climbs in places along this stretch. Near the top of this climb the trail levels and your reward is the Split Rock Lookout. At the lookout there is a large boulder and an area where part of the bedrock has separated. The views to the west are very good but there isn’t much to see other than trees and mountains except for one house on the far ridge. The lookout is about 5.2 miles into the hike. From the lookout the trail ascends for about .1 miles at a 26% grade. This isn’t very far but it looks like a WALL from the bottom. At 5.3 miles, turn left on the red Mary Smith Trail as the Pelnor Hollow Trail continues straight ahead. The Mary Smith Trail is an almost continuous downhill to Berry Brook Road. There are a few tricky descent through rocks and around trees. After 1.1 miles and a drop of over 500 feet you should be back at the car. When you come out of the woods and cross the power line right-of-way, watch for the point where the trail reenters the woods on the other side.

(The map shows the parking area and the one way hiking route.)

brock_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Burnt Knobnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 3.8 mi 1330 ft GPSies

burntknob_map Park at trail head parking area on Black Dome or Big Hollow Road. Be aware that past a certain point this road is considered seasonal and may not be plowed or maintained. During the winter the trailhead parking is almost never plowed and parking is limited along the shoulders of the road. The trail head is just BEFORE the parking area on the right. Find the red-blazed Black Dome Trail and immediately cross the Batavia Kill on a bridge. After a short walk, re-cross the Batavia Kill and continue on the Trail for about 1.1 miles. Look over your shoulder occasionally to see the imposing presence of Blackhead, Black Dome and Thomas Cole Mountains. This walk winds its way upward through mixed hardwood and spruce forest until it meets the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail. When the streams are running high, you may be unable to make the second crossing after the bridge without running the risk of getting very wet at the beginning of the hike! The map shown was created at such a time. It shows a bushwhack route up the west side of the stream. The bushwhack meets the Escarpment Trail just west of the “official” point which is marked by a sign. Turn left on The Escarpment Trail and head toward Burnt Knob. The terrain now is more rugged and steeper. There is a hint of views to both the north and south on both sides of the trail but they are not clear. The final ascent onto Burnt Knob is a little steep requiring some help from your poles or surrounding roots and trees. At the top of this short but steep ascent there is a nice view to the north of the valley and a view to the east toward Acra Point. Continue on this trail for a short distance until a short spur leads of to the right. This viewpoint offers an unobstructed view of the Black Dome Valley, Acra Point and the Blackhead Range. This is a good place to stop and enjoy a snack and the view. This area is only about .35 miles from the junction with the Black Dome trail and less if you did the bushwhack. Continue on for another .35 miles until the trail starts to descend. From here you can see Windham mountain and get some views to the south. Return by retracing your path on the trail or the bushwhack. You can return on the Black Dome Trail even if you bushwhacked up. Before the first water crossing, turn right or west for a short distance until you come to the Batavia Kill. Cross here and walk up to the top of the ridge. You should find the track of your bushwhack up. Follow this track to bushwhack back to the trail register and the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

burntknob_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Burnt Knob and Acra Pointnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.5 mi 1730 ft GPSies

Burnt Knob and Acra Pt (loop)_map Park at trail head parking area on Black Dome or Big Hollow Road. Be aware that past a certain point this road is considered seasonal and may not be plowed or maintained. During the winter the trailhead parking is almost never plowed and parking is limited along the shoulders of the road. The trail head is just BEFORE the parking area on the left. Find the red-blazed Black Dome Trail and immediately cross the Batavia Kill on a bridge. Immediately re-cross the Batavia Kill and continue on the trail for about 1.1 miles where you will meet the blue Escarpment Trail. When the streams are running high, you may be unable to make the second crossing after the bridge without running the risk of getting very wet at the beginning of the hike! Look over your shoulder occasionally to see the imposing presence of Blackhead, Black Dome and Thomas Cole Mountains. Turn left on The Escarpment Trail and head toward Burnt Knob. The terrain now is more rugged and steeper. There is a hint of views to both the north and south on both sides of the trail but they are not clear. The final ascent onto Burnt Knob is a little steep requiring some help from your poles or surrounding roots and trees. At the top of this short but steep ascent there is a nice view to the north of the valley and a view to the east toward Acra Point. Continue on this trail for a short distance until a short spur leads of to the left at about 1.4 miles. This viewpoint offers an unobstructed view of the Black Dome Valley, Acra Point and the Blackhead Range. This is a good place to stop and enjoy a snack and the view. From this viewpoint start your bushwhack to the top of the ridge by heading straight up the spur trail and climbing UP. The bushwhack up and along the ridge to the highest point is only about .3 miles. From the top head southwest and DOWN until you meet the Escarpment Trail. Turn left to head east toward Acra Point. Pass by the turn to the parking area on The Black Dome Trail and continue up the hill to the east. At about 2.7 miles watch for a spur trail to the right which leads to another nice lookout. This one looks down the Black Dome valley and has a great view of the Blackhead Range. Spend some time here and then go back to the Escarpment Trail and turn right to walk another .5 miles to the highest spot on Acra Point. Continue along the trail to 4.9 miles where you will meet the Batavia Kill Trail. Along the way there are several ups and downs. Turn right at the trail junction to get back to your car. This last part is 1.6 miles but it is all downhill!

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

Burnt Knob and Acra Pt (loop)_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Cabot Mountain from Beech Hill Roadnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 3.2 mi. 917 ft. GPSies

beechcabot_map Head toward Lew Beach on the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor. Pass through Lew Beach toward Turnwood. Watch for a right hand turn with a road sign for Beech Hill Road. Drive up the road for about 2.6 miles and park at the parking area on the right. The hike to the Beaverkill Vista viewpoint and back is only be about 3 miles but part of it is steep. The first part of the trail is flat and actually descends a little and it almost always wet. At about .25 miles into the hike the trail starts to ascend and gains 575 feet over the next .5 miles. The grade is around 25% in most places! After this point the trail flattens out and rolls a little along the way to the viewpoint. At .85 miles you may notice what looks like a road off the trail on the left. I don’t know much about it but it does look very much like a road. Continue without much change in elevation to 1.25 miles where the trail ascends again and then drops a little to the vista at 1.6 miles. Turn around to retrace your steps back to the car. The challenge on the way back is to descend safely on the steeper slopes but the return is almost always faster. We were back at the car by 2:40 PM having covered 3.2 miles in just under 2 hours. The trip up took 1 hour and 10 minutes. The return journey was completed in 45 minutes.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

beechcabot_pro
(The image shows the profile of the out and back hike. )


Campbell Brook: Campbell Brook Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.5 mi. 1622 ft. GPSies

campbellbrook_map Head out of Roscoe on Route 206. As you crest Cat Hollow and start down the other side, there is a small parking area on the left side of the road after Jug Tavern Road. Park here and sign in at the trail registry. Walk down the woods road and cross a small brook which may be high when there has been significant rain or snow melt. In this area are several old foundations to explore. Walk along the trail by the brook and cross on the footbridge. The trail now begins to ascend Campbell Mountain and can be wet with running water. At about 1.2 miles there is a sharp turn or switchback to the left but it is well marked. The trail continues to ascend rather steeply and at 1.3 miles is a lean-to with privy. The highest point on the trail (2430 feet) is reached at around 1.9 miles. Continue on down the other side of the hill to Campbell Brook Road at 2.4 miles. Cross the road here and pick up the Trout Pond Trail on the other side. The trail continues to descend until you cross the bridge over Campbell Brook at 2.75 miles.From there it is a 1 mile climb to the highest point on the hike at 2510 feet. Head down the other side to Campbell Brook Road at 4.3 miles. From here it is a 3.2 mile road walk back to the car. Turn left on Campbell Brook Road. Make the next left onto Campbell Mountain Road. Turn right at the next intersection on Jug Tavern Road. Stay on Jug Tavern until it meets Route 206. Turn left and walk .7 miles downhill back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

campbellbrook_pro
(The image shows the profile of the out and back hike. )


Campbell Brook: Campbell Mountain Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.2 mi. 1130 ft. GPSies

campbellloop_map Head out of Roscoe on Route 206. As you crest Cat Hollow and start down the other side, there is a small parking area on the left side of the road after Jug Tavern Road. Park here and sign in at the trail registry. Walk down the woods road and cross a small brook which may be high when there has been significant rain or snow melt. In this area are several old foundations to explore. Walk along the trail by the brook and cross on the footbridge. The trail now begins to ascend Campbell Mountain and can be wet with running water. At about 1.2 miles there is a sharp turn or switchback to the left but it is well marked. The trail continues to ascend rather steeply and at 1.3 miles is a lean-to with privy. The highest point on the trail (2430 feet) is reached at around 1.9 miles. You can turn around now or walk down to “tag” Campbell Brook Road. This is another .6 miles downhill which you must climb on the return trip. You can also continue and fashion a loop out of the trails and back roads in the area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

campbellloop_pro
(The image shows the profile of the out and back hike. )


Campbell Brook: Campbell Mountain Out and Backnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.0 mi. 1270 ft. GPSies

campbellob_map Head out of Roscoe on Route 206. As you crest Cat Hollow and start down the other side, there is a small parking area on the left side of the road after Jug Tavern Road. Park here and sign in at the trail registry. Walk down the woods road and cross a small brook which may be high when there has been significant rain or snow melt. In this area are several old foundations to explore. Walk along the trail by the brook and cross on the footbridge. The trail now begins to ascend Campbell Mountain and can be wet with running water. At about 1.2 miles there is a sharp turn or switchback to the left but it is well marked. The trail continues to ascend rather steeply and at 1.3 miles is a lean-to with privy. The highest point on the trail (2430 feet) is reached at around 1.9 miles. You can turn around now or walk down to “tag” Campbell Brook Road. This is another .6 miles downhill which you must climb on the return trip. You can also continue and fashion a loop out of the trails and back roads in the area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

campbellob_pro
(The image shows the profile of the out and back hike. )


Campbell Brook: Trout Pond to Route 206new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 12.4 mi. 2700 ft. GPSies

troutcampbell_map About half of this hike is on trails and the other half on back roads. Even the roads are scenic so you don’t lose much walking along them. The initial part is the same as the Trout Pond hike. Turn left on Morton Hill Road on Route 206 just after the Rockland flats. Bear right up Morton Hill Road until you see a parking area on the left near the sign indicates Russell Brook Road is closed. Park here and hike down Russell Brook Road half a mile to the actual trail head. Go over the bridge and look to your right to see a beautiful waterfall. Explore this area if you like. Back on the trail you may go to the left or right. Go to the right and walk another 1.5 miles to the head of Trout Pond. The trail is a gentle uphill all the way with the last quarter mile along the edge of the lake. At the head of the lake the trail branches right to Campbell Brook. Bear right on stay on the blue-blazed Trout Pond Trail. This trail continues for another 3.1 miles. On the way you pass over the shoulders of two unnamed mountains. Campbell Brook and Campbell Mountain Roads are the low points in between. The trail goes on for another 1.9 miles and up and down another mountain until it meets Route 206. Turn right on Route 206 and walk .7 miles up the hill until you turn right on Jug Tavern Road. After walking 1.8 miles along Jug Tavern make a left onto Campbell Brook Road. Continue walking on this road for 3.15 miles back to the car. Campbell Brook changes to Morton Hill Road after a short distance but there are no turns.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)
troutcampbell_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. The vertical ascents and descent are not as pronounced as shown here since they are exaggerated by the overall distance. The first low point is the trail head register at Russell Brook. The second is at the base of the climb up to Route 206. You can see that Morton Hill Road is downhill all the way!)


Colgate Lake to Stoppel Pointnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 11.9 mi. 1947 ft. GPSies

stoppel_map Take Route 23C north from Route 23A in Tannersville. Stay on this road until it crests the hill at Onteora Park and passes the stone church at the top. Stop here for some very nice views of the Devil’s Path. Continue down the other side of the hill to East Jewett. Turn onto CR 78 which should have a sign for Colgate Lake. Pass Colgate Lake on the right and park at the DEC parking area on the left. The gate marks the beginning of the yellow-blazed Colgate Lake Trail. The trail starts through a meadow with some nice views of the surrounding mountains. After about a quarter of a mile it enters the woods. The trail is mostly flat and winds its way in back of Lake Capra which is a privately owned inholding in the Catskill Park. There are several bridges of different types over various bodies of running water. Along the trail watch for a beaver meadow on the the left at about 2.5 miles. Walk out to the beaver meadow which was once a beaver pond. There is a nice view of Blackhead Mountain from here and the meadow itself is pretty. Just passed the meadow is a beaver pond and the trail skirts this area. A little further at about 3.1 miles is another meadow with another great view of Blackhead Mountain. A few hundred feet up the trail you can cut into the woods on several informal trails or you can make your own. There is a nice small, secluded waterfall here. Back on the main trail it is another 2.3 miles to the junction of the trail with the Escarpment Trail. This last part of the walk is more uphill as you ascend to Dutcher’s Notch. You will be walking between the Escarpment on your right and another ridge on your left. On your immediate left is a deep ravine. The terrain is rugged and beautiful but offers no views. At the junction with the blue-blazed Escarpment Trail, turn right and be prepared to climb. The trail takes you up to the Escarpment which was on your right as you were coming up the Colgate Lake trail. The trail climbs some but is not too steep. Once on the Escarpment the trail is mostly flat until Stoppel Point. All along the trail you can see that you are on a ridge and that there might be interesting views especially on your left. Keep walking and wait for some real viewpoints! At 1.2 miles is a great lookout right on the trail with views to the north and northeast. Back on the trail the climbing gets steeper now as you begin to ascend to Stoppel Point. In a little less than a mile you will find the wreckage of a two-seater Piper Cub right on the trail on the left. Passed the wreck only a few hundred feet is a lookout to the south and west. Keep walking on the trail and pass the point where your GPS might indicate the location of Stoppel Point. Walk until you find a DEC signpost and a GREAT lookout to the north and northeast. To get back just retrace your steps. Another option is to park a car at the Schutt Road parking area near North South Lake State Campgrounds. You can then walk through over North Mountain and North Point and experience the rest of the lower end of the Escarpment Trail.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

stoppel_pro

(The image is the vertical profile for the out and back hike so it has a symmetrical appearance.)

Colonel’s Chairnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look (Spruceton Trail)
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 9.0 mi. 2907 ft. GPSies

hunterchair_map I have included the summit of Hunter Mountain on the map and profile. You can cut some time, distance and elevation by avoiding the climb to the peak. However, once you are as far as the Colonel’s Chair Spur Trail the peak of Hunter is only a mile and a quarter further. The peak is the second highest in the Catskill’s. It also has a fire tower which offers a spectacular view of most of the other peaks on a clear day. Park at the large trailhead parking lot near the end of the Spruceton Road. This is the first of three parking lots and each is smaller than the previous. Find the blue-blazed Spruceton Trail which starts as a wide, gated road which follows Hunter Brook. After crossing a small bridge across the brook, you will come to a hairpin turn to the right. Look to your right as you ascend this trail for imposing views of West Kill. After 1.7 miles, the trail turns right off the road but remains fairly wide and well kept. In the winter water from the spring can overflow the trail forming ice flows that can be dangerous. In the other seasons this spring may cause the trail to be muddy. At the spring is a nice lookout which offers views of Rusk Mountain, West Kill, and, farther off, North dome and Sherrill. Only .3 miles beyond the spring is the Colonel’s Chair spur trail blazed in yellow. This trail descends almost 500 feet over 1.1 miles and ends up at the top of the Hunter Mountain ski area. Several areas are steep and, of course, must be ascended on the way back. As you walk you will notice colored and numbered trails. These are used for snowshoeing and mountain biking. Stay on the main trail which turns into a dirt road. You will pass on open area on your left which is a stone quarry. A little further on the right is a lookout and a sculpture of Rip VanWinkle. If you miss this, you can follow the signs from the ski lifts. Stay on the trail until you start to see ski lifts. At this point you can walk around to the top of the various lifts and slopes. The views of the surrounding mountains and those in the distance are beautiful. There are also great views of the village of Hunter in the valley below. Reverse your steps to climb back up to the main trail. At this point you can turn left to the summit of Hunter Mountain or right to get back to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

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Crystal Lakenew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 2.9 mi. 410 ft. GPSies

crystal_map This area is a small New York State Wild Forest area between Roscoe and Fremont Center. Get on County Route 93. About halfway between the Roscoe and Fremont center watch for Tennanah Lake Road which heads north from CR 93. After the turn the parking area will be a short distance on the left. Depending on the season you may be able to drive up the access road and park in the small parking area. In the winter you will have to park on the side of the road as there is no maintenance.

(The map shows the parking area and the clockwise hiking route.)

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Delhi Trails: Sheldon Loop new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 4.6 mi. 1585 ft. GPSies

delhisheldon_map In the village of Delhi, turn onto Route 28 south and drive to Sheldon Drive which is a left turn just before the school on the left. Drive to the end of Sheldon Drive and park in one of the school lots. The beginning of the trail is not clearly marked from the parking area but it is near the community garden. The entire trail system is marked with black arrows on a yellow background with no change in markers for the three different trails. The trail climbs starting at the parking area but at about .4 miles there is a “wall”. Over the next .3 miles the trail gains 455 feet making the average grade 28%! The trails are wide woods roads and but the steepness of the trails makes them a little beyond the ability of most beginners. The trail begins by heading to the northeast but as it began to climb to the top of the ridge it turns to the south. The walk is through pleasant hardwood forests and at about .75 miles the trail levels off briefly at the top of the ridge. The Gribley Trail now starts a short but steep descent from one hilltop before a short but steep ascent to the next. Along the way the Frightful Falls Trail comes up on the right as it ascends from below. At 1.6 miles the trail is back on top of a hill and at the highest point on the hike. The trail description mentions viewpoints but there are none that are open. Almost immediately the trail begins to descend from the high point losing over 500 feet as it heads southwest off the ridge. At 2.3 miles there is a power line right-of-way with some views down into the valley. Just before this area, there is a trail junction where the Gribley Trail ends and the Bulldog Run Trail begins. The trails are marked with only one color so it is difficult to make these distinctions. From the right-of-way the trail continues to descend as it turns almost 180 degrees to head northeast. The trail parallels Route 28 for some distance ascending as it progresses. At about 3 miles the Bulldog Run Trail turns off to the left as it headed down to Route 28 and the Immanuel Lutheran Church. Continue straight ahead on the Frightful Fall Trail which ascends to the ridge to the Gribley Trail. The trail ascends to the ridge heading east or northeast and gains 285 feet in the process for an average 18% grade. At 3.5 miles turn left on the Gribley Trail and take note of a bluestone quarry. The Gribley Trail continues to ascend to the top of the ridge gaining another 170 feet. Walk across the top of the ridge and then start back down to the parking area. The descent of this steep area can be even more challenging than the ascent! Continue to follow the trail back to your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the clockwise hiking route.)
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Denman Mountain Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.4 mi. 950 ft. GPSies

denmanloop_map Turn onto Moore Hill Road just east of the TriValley School in Grahamsville, NY. Head north staying on Moore Hill Road for about 3 miles. Park in the parking lot at the corner of Moore Hill and Glade Hill Roads. The road straight ahead is not maintained in the winter but the lot is also always plowed. Walk across the road and onto the snowmobile trail which begins a slight ascent up a shoulder of Denman Mountain but soon levels off> It descends to a trail junction at about .5 miles. A left turn at this junction leads back out to Moore Hill Road and the road that cuts over to Denman Mountain Road. Turn right to stay on the trail around the mountain. At .85 miles there will be a path or woods road on the left that leads down to some interesting stone foundations. The road is lined with stone walls on either side. The snowmobile trail continues to descend for the next mile but is always lower than the mountain on the right. Since the trail is lower, the water draining from the higher terrain makes the trail very wet in places depending on the season. At about 1.95 miles there is the ruins of a house or cabin on the right side of the trail. You have been heading mostly north but the road for your return is to the east. At 2.15 miles there is another trail junction where you should turn right and then bear to the left. For the next 1.2 miles the trail wanders back and forth and up and down but always around the mountain. Finally, at about 3.3 miles the trail turns in an easterly direction and heads directly for the road. For the next 1.5 miles the trail undulates up and down but always heads east. At 4.8 miles, you should hit the road and turn right to head south and back to the parking area. There are some interesting cliffs and one large boulder right next to the road. The road continues heading south and mostly descends with a few ups and downs until you are back at the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the clockwise hiking route.)
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Dry Brook: German Hollownew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 3.3 mi. 1425 ft. GPSies

drygerman_map There are several different ways to access this area from the Margaretville and Arkville areas. The German Hollow Trail comes up to the Dry Brook Ridge trail from a side road off the Dry Brook Road. In Arkville turn south on Dry Brook Road. Watch for Chris Long Road on the right. Go to the end of the road and turn around. Park on the right side of the road opposite a house. There is room for two cars at most. The yellow German Hollow trail is a wide woods road to the Dry Brook Ridge trail and is about 1.6 miles long. The German Hollow lean-to is, at present, buried underneath several large trees that have crushed it! Once on the ridge you can turn around or hike the Ridge Trail to the Penguin Rocks.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)
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Dry Brook: German Hollow to Lookoutsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.1 mi. 2240 ft. GPSies

drybrookgermanlookouts_map There are several different ways to access this area from the Margaretville and Arkville areas. The German Hollow Trail comes up to the Dry Brook Ridge trail from a side road off the Dry Brook Road. In Arkville turn south on Dry Brook Road. Watch for Chris Long Road on the right. Go to the end of the road and turn around. Park on the right side of the road opposite a house. There is room for two cars at most. The yellow German Hollow trail is a wide woods road to the Dry Brook Ridge trail and is about 1.6 miles long. The German Hollow lean-to is, at present, buried underneath several large trees that have crushed it! Once on the ridge you can turn left on the Dry Brook Ridge Trail. Walk about a mile to the junction with the Huckleberry Loop Trail gaining about 300 feet along the way. Stay on the Dry Brook Ridge Trail for another mile and gain 225 feet until a short side trail leads to thee lookouts over the Pepacton Reservoir. .

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)
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Dry Brook: Hill Rd to Viewpointsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.75 mi. 1663 ft. GPSies

drybrook_map There are several different ways to access this area from the Margaretville and Arkville areas. The Dry Brook Trail starts near the Agway store in Margaretville and proceeds over Pakatakan Mountain and to the viewpoints. The German Hollow Trail comes up to the Dry Brook Ridge trail from a side road off the Dry Brook Road. This route follows the upper Huckleberry Loop Trail from the Hill Road parking area. There are also two parking areas on Huckleberry Brook Road that can be used. From Routes 28 and 30 in Margaretville get on Southside Road. You may also use BWS Route 10 if you are coming from the Pepacton Reservoir to the west. Watch for the turn onto Huckleberry Brook Road. It is about 2 miles from Margaretville and less than a mile from the junction of BWS Route 10 with Routes 28 and 30. After turning onto Huckleberry Road, watch for the turn onto Hill Road about a quarter mile up on the right. Continue on Hill Road for a little over 1 mile until you see signs for “wild forest”. The parking area will be on the right and is small with only enough room for a few cars. This should not be a problem since this route is not as popular as it should be. After parking, cross the road and sign into the register. The trail ascends not too steeply through a pine plantation where the trees are evenly spaced. The trail is wide as it overlaps an old woods road. The floor is covered with pine needles which makes it cushioned and easy to walk on. The pine plantation slowly gives way to hardwoods and then leads into more pines. At times the trail narrows as it leaves the meandering woods road. In places it is narrow enough to have briars and nettles in the trail! After a little more than 1.5 miles the trail ends at the blue Dry Brook Trail. Turning left will take to Margaretville so turn right to continue toward the viewpoints. The trail on the ridge is relatively flat with several small ascents and descents. There are a few parts that pass by some large rocks but without any real “scrambles”. After about 1.3 miles of walking, hints of a view appear on the right. Don’t stop here since the lookouts are just ahead. The first lookout is a rock shelf with several levels. There are views from all levels but the ones from the lower levels are the least obstructed. The views ate to the west over Cold Spring Hollow and the Pepacton Reservoir. The trick is to hike this route on a clear day with little humidity so that the haze does not cloud the view. You may now walk another .7 miles the another set of viewpoints and the highest point on the ridge. The views aren’t much different than the ones you have just taken in so you may want to immediately turn back and make your way back to the car. The trail back can be descended quickly especially after the turn onto the Huckleberry Loop Trail.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)
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Dry Brook: Huckleberry Loop (complete)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 11.2 mi. 2940 ft. GPSies

drybrookall_map There are several different ways to access this loop hike area from the Margaretville and Arkville areas. The Huckleberry Loop Trail crosses Hill Road and runs along Huckleberry Brook Road. There is a parking area on Hill Road and two on Huckleberry Brook Road. There is also a parking areas on Ploutz Road of the Millbrook Road but Ploutz Road is poorly maintained. This route starts at the Hill Road parking area and heads south to the lower Huckleberry Loop Trail first and then proceeds up Dry Brook Ridge in a counterclockwise direction. From Routes 28 and 30 in Margaretville get on Southside Road. You may also use BWS Route 10 if you are coming from the Pepacton Reservoir to the west. Watch for the turn onto Huckleberry Brook Road. It is about 2 miles from Margaretville and less than a mile from the junction of BWS Route 10 with Routes 28 and 30. After turning onto Huckleberry Road, watch for the turn onto Hill Road about a quarter mile up on the right. Continue on Hill Road for a little over 1 mile until you see signs for “wild forest”. The parking area will be on the right and is small with only enough room for a few cars. From the parking area walk up the road a few feet and turn right into the woods on the red Huckleberry Loop Trail. Walk .3 miles south on the trail to the upper parking area on Huckleberry Brook Road. Bear right near the road, walk through a small open area and cross the bridge to the road. Walk west on the road for .8 miles to the lower parking area. Just passed the parking area on the left is a bridge over Huckleberry Brook. Sign the register here and get ready to start climbing right away. The trail soon merges with an old woods road and follows it until about .4 miles after the bridge. At this point it turns again and starts to climb the ridge. Be careful to make the turn to the right as the road continues straight ahead. For the next .85 miles the trail switches back several times as it climbs to the ridge line. Watch for some very large and very old hardwood and softwood trees. In addition, there are some impressive rock formation that show exceptionally clear sedimentary layers. At this point the trail begins to deteriorate. If you are lucky, someone will have cut down some of the briars, brush and undergrowth but the going will still be tough! For the next 3.5 miles you will have to hack your way through raspberry canes, briars, nettles, ferns and various bushes. You will do this without being able to see the rocks and fallen trees under foot that will trip you up. You will also be treated to several ascents and descents of small hills on your way to the parking area on Plover Road. When you get to the trailhead on Plowboy Road you will have hiked about .4 miles but it will feel like half again as much distance. To get to Ploutz Road you will have dropped down from the ridge and then ascended to about 2400 feet. What awaits you is another 5 miles of hiking which starts with an ascent to the top of Dry Brook Ridge at almost 3500 feet. Walk across the road to the parking area and continue on the red trail. The trail now ascends for a little over a mile to the ridge. The ascent starts and ends easily but the parts in between can be steep at times! At the ridge the trail flattens and in about .35 miles you will reach the junction with the blue Dry Brook Ridge Trail. Turn left toward Margaretville and walk for about .8 miles to a viewpoint over Cold Spring Hollow and the Pepacton Reservoir. Another .7 miles of walking brings another set of lookouts with much the same view. Continue on the trail for another 1 mile until the junction with the red Huckleberry loop trail. Turn left on the trail and hike 1.55 miles back to the parking area on Hill Road. This descent is rather and you can make good time walking downhill. The trail descends not too steeply first through hardwoods and then narrows in several places as it leaves the meandering woods road. In these places some briars and nettles may encroach on the trail. After some more hard woods the trail merges with and stays on an old woods road that runs through a pine plantation where the trees are evenly spaced. The trail is wide as it overlaps an old woods road. The floor is covered with pine needles which makes it cushioned and easy to walk on. In at least one spot are some old foundations and in others stone walls.

(The map shows the parking area and the counterclockwise hiking route.)
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Dry Brook: From Margaretville Trailheadnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.0 mi. 2065 ft. GPSies

drybrookmargaretville_map This route starts at the Millbrook Trailhead and ends at the junction with the trail from Hill Road. Of, course, the hike could easily be extend by continuing out to the lookouts and beyond! In Margaretville get on Southside Road which runs parallel to Route 28 and head northeast. Park in the parking area alongside the road just after Fair St on the left. The trail starts across the road. The first 1.7 miles of the trail climbs Pakatakan Mountain and is wide woods road most of the way. A direct route up the mountain would be very steep so there are several switchbacks which also help to avoid some rather nice ledges and cliffs. The overall route shows a grade of about 12% but there are some short stretches that are around 20%! After the summit, your climb is still not over as Dry Brook Ridge is at a higher elevation. At about 2.6 miles the German Hollow Trail comes in from Arkville on the left. From German Hollow the trail climbs for another .5 miles when in inexplicably drops about 100 feet! From this point the trail turns almost due south and climbs nearly 200 feet in a little over .1 miles to Dry Brook Ridge. This is almost a 30% grade and you will feel it! To return to your car simply retrace your path. The Penguin Rocks viewpoint is only another mile along the ridge. The trail wanders back and forth and does gain an additional 225 feet of elevation but this can be a welcome respite from the steep ascent and subsequent descent of the ridge.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)
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Dry Brook: From Millbrook Trailheadnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.2mi. 1630 ft. GPSies

drybrookmillbrook_map This route starts at the Millbrook Trailhead and ends at the junction with the Huckleberry Loop Trail. The hike could be extended since another 1.3 miles will bring you to the Penguin Rocks lookout. You could also hike through to another trail head if you spot a car. The trail is deceptive since the elevation is gained over about three miles. However, the trail rises to 3460 feet and is #37 on the CHH list. Get on the New York City road that leaves Margaretville and passes long the south side of the Pepacton Reservoir. After about 3.5 miles, watch for the Millbrook Arena Road on the left. Turn here and drive about 9.5 miles to the Millbrook trail head on the left. Park to begin your hike. Once you are on the Dry Brook Ridge Trail the hike is very straight forward as long as you stay on the marked trail. The trail starts up almost immediately over a small hill gaining 440 feet in the first .7 miles. It then drops almost 300 feet in the next .5 miles before starting up to the ridge. In the next mile the trail ascends to the ridge gaining 680 feet before leveling off at the top. For the next .9 miles the trail drops about 100 feet only to regain that elevation to the junction with the Huckleberry Loop trail coming up to the ridge from the west.

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Dry Brook: Viewpoints from Millbrook Trailheadnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 9.4 mi. 22440 ft. GPSies

drybrookmillbrookview_map This route starts at the Millbrook Trailhead and is an out and back to the viewpoints over the Pepacton Reservoir. You could also hike through to another trail head if you spot a car. The trail is deceptive since the elevation is gained over about three miles. However, the trail rises to 3460 feet and is #37 on the CHH list. To get to the very highest point on the ridge you will have to bushwhack slightly to the north of the trail. Get on the New York City road, Route 9/10, that leaves Route 28 just west of Margaretville and passes long the south side of the Pepacton Reservoir. After about 3.5 miles, watch for the Millbrook Arena Road on the left. Turn here and drive about 9.5 miles to the Millbrook trailhead on the left. Park to begin your hike. Once you are on the Dry Brook Ridge Trail the hike is very straight forward as long as you stay on the marked trail. The trail starts up almost immediately over a small hill gaining 440 feet in the first .7 miles. It then drops almost 300 feet in the next .5 miles before starting up to the ridge. In the next mile the trail ascends to the ridge gaining 680 feet before leveling off at the top. For the next .9 miles the trail drops about 100 feet only to regain that elevation to the junction with the Huckleberry Loop trail coming up to the ridge from the west. Continue passed this point for another 1.4 miles and you will arrive at the best lookout over the reservoir at 4.7 miles into the hike. Before this lookout there are several others but this one is the best. When you are done, turn around and follow your route back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)
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Dry Brook: From Ploutz Road Trailheadnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.5 mi. 1380 ft. GPSies

drybrookploutz_map This route starts at the Ploutz Road Trailhead on the Huckleberry Loop Trail and ends at the Penguin Rocks lookout. The trail rises to 3460 feet on Dry Brook Ridge which is #37 on the CHH list. Get on the New York City road that leaves Margaretville and passes long the south side of the Pepacton Reservoir. After about 3.5 miles, watch for the Millbrook Arena Road on the left. Turn here and drive about 6.5 miles to Ploutz Road on the left. This road is ROUGH but there is a small trail head parking area on the right as you drive up the road. Park here to begin your hike. The trail is a no nonsense affair that goes directly up to the ridge. In 1.25 miles it gains over 1000 feet and then virtually levels off on the ridge. Just out of the parking area you will cross over two parallel stone walls. These walls delineate a lane that probably lead from a barn to a pasture. Turn left along this lane and you will see that it opens into a large area bounded by stone walls. Trees have grown up in the pasture but it purpose is clear. At the top of the ridge the Huckleberry Loop Trail intersect the Dry Brook Ridge Trail. Turn left and walk about 1.4 miles to the lookouts. There are several different lookouts. The best is the last from this direction. There is a large stone ledge with several levels. The views into the hollow and over to the Pepacton are unobstructed. The only problem is a persistent haze in the valleys. Retrace your path back to the parking area.

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Frick Pondnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagit 2.2 mi. 200 ft. GPSies

FrickPondOnly_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake Trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. You will cross over the bridge at the outlet to Frick Pond. This is a beautiful spot to take pictures in all four seasons and under most lighting conditions. Continue around the pond and at about .7 miles there will be a trail junction. Bear to the right and walk around the “back” of the pond on an unnamed trail. You will cross over several wooden “bridges” or “causeways” over running water and marshy areas. BE CAREFUL as these wooden bridges are usually in the shade, grow moss readily and can be VERY SLIPPERY. After another .5 miles of walking you will be at Times Square, a four way trail junction. Turn right on the yellow Loggers Loop Trail and continue to circle Frick Pond. At 1.75 miles you will have completed the loop. Turn left and follow the red Quick Lake Trail back to your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

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Frick Pond: Big Rock and Flynn Trailsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 4.0 mi. 775 ft. GPSies

frickdownflynn_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous p ssibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. You will cross over the bridge at the outlet to Frick Pond. This is a beautiful spot to take pictures in all four seasons and under most lighting conditions. Continue around the pond and at about .7 miles there will be a trail junction. Bear to the right and walk around the “back” of the pond on an unnamed trail. You will cross over several wooden “bridges” or “causeways” over running water and marshy areas. BE CAREFUL as these wooden bridges are usually in the shade, grow moss readily and can be VERY SLIPPERY. After another .5 miles of walking you will be at Times Square, a four way trail junction. Continue straight ahead on the Big Rock Trail. This is the most challenging part of the hike at the trail gains about 650 feet of elevation over the next 1.1 miles. At the highest point on the Big Rock Trail there is a trail junction with the Flynn Trail. Turning left will take you to Hodge Pond. Turn right to go down the Flynn Trail and back to your car. The walk is about 1.7 miles but it is all down hill. When you approach the gate at the bottom of the trail, continue to follow the trail to the left into the woods. The cabin straight ahead is private property and may be occupied.

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Frick Pond: Flynn and Big Rock Trailsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 4.0 mi. 747 ft. GPSies

frickupflynn_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Walk across the road to pick up the Flynn Trail. The cabin straight ahead on the road is private property and may be occupied. The hike up the Flynn Trail is 1.7 miles that is all uphill. The elevation gain to the junction with the Big Rock Trail is around 600 feet so the grade is not too great. Turn left at the top of the Flynn Trail and head down the Big Rock Trail to the four-way trail junction called Times Square. The distance is right around 1.1 miles with a drop of around 580 feet. There are two options here to return to the parking area. Continue straight ahead around the “back” of Frick Pond on a well-defined but unnamed path. This trail has several wooden bridges and walkways that can be slick when wet. From Times Square to the bridge at the outlet of Frick Pond is about .6 miles and almost flat. From the bridge walk up the hill to the right and along a trail that opens to a woods road. St the trail register turn right to stay on the trail and arrive back at the parking area.

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Frick and Hodge Pond: Big Rock and Quick Lake Trailsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.3 mi. 1130 ft. GPSies

Frick and Hodge (Big Rock Quick Lake)_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the Quick Lake Trail which leaves the back right corner of the larger parking area. Follow this out to the register box where you should turn right to continue on the Quick Lake Trail. At the first trail junction bear left and walk down to the bridge across the outlet from Frick Pond. Continue on around the pond and bear right at the next junction so that you wrap around the “back” of Frick Pond. Continue on this trail to Times Square, a junction with trails in all 4 cardinal directions. Walk straight ahead and start UP the Big Rock Trail which gains 600 feet in a little over a mile and meets the Flynn Trail. Turn left on the Flynn Trail and follow it .7 miles down to Hodge Pond. There is a woods rod that branches to the right along the way but you should avoid this. From Ridge Pond you may choose to walk around the pond to the left or right. Watch for the Flynn Trail as it branches off from the northwest corner of the pond. Follow the Flynn Trail for about .5 miles to Junkyard Junction where you should turn right to get on the Quick Lake Trail which will take you back to the parking area. In 1.4 miles a snowmobile trail will branch to the right. Stay on the Quick Lake Trail for another .2 miles to Iron Wheel Junction. The Logger’s Loop is straight ahead but you should turn right to follow the Quick Lake trail back to the outlet of Frick Pond in about 1 mile. From Frick Pond follow the Quick Lake trail .5 miles back to your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in an anticlockwise direction.)

Frick and Hodge (Big Rock Quick Lake)_pro

(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)

Frick Pond: Logger’s Loop Clockwisenew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 3.7 mi. 408 ft. GPSies

logger_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop. Turn left here to go to Frick Pond which is just .1 miles away. Follow the Quick Lake Trail over the bridge and bear left at the next trail junction1 to stay of red Quick Lake Trail. At about 1.5 miles you will be at Iron Wheel Junction which is marked by a set of … iron wheels. The Quick Lake Trail turns left here and heads toward Hodge Pond. Turn right on the yellow Logger’s Loop Trail. The trail ascends slightly and then begins a descent to Times Square at 2.75 miles. The name indicates that many trails cross at this point. Continue straight ahead on the Logger’s Loop Trail which will bring you back to the trail junction near Frick Pond at 3.3 miles. Walk back out the way you came on the red Quick Lake Trail which will bring you back to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

loggerscw_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative! This image suggests some rugged and steep ascents and descents but the trail is really rather FLAT.)


Frick Pond: Logger’s Loop Counterclockwisenew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 3.7 mi. 408 ft. GPSies

logger_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop. If you turn left here, Frick pond is just .1 miles. Turn right on Logger’s Loop and follow it for .55 miles to Times Square. The name indicates that many trails cross at this point. Continue straight for another 1.2 miles to Iron Wheel Junction which is marked by a set of…iron wheels. Turn left on the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and stay on it for 1.1 miles to Frick Pond. In another .5 miles you will be back at the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

loggersccw_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative! This image suggests some rugged and steep ascents and descents but the trail is really rather FLAT.)

Frick Pond: Flynn and Big Rock Trails and Logger’s Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.6 mi. 908 ft. GPSies

frickflynnbiglog_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Cross the road and start up the blue Flynn Trail which rises continuously but gently to a junction with the Big Rock Trail at 1.7 miles. The overall elevation gain is about 600 feet but the grade is less than 7%. At the junction turn left on the red Big Rock Trail which I also a snowmobile trail and walk just over a mile down to Times Square, a trail junction with trails in four different directions. When you reach the bottom, you will have dropped most of the elevation you gained on the Flynn Trail. Turn right on the yellow Logger’s Loop which ascends about 200 feet to 3.7 miles into the hike. From here walk downhill to Iron Wheel Junction at 4.1 miles and turn left on the Quick Lake trail. This trail will take you to the bridge across the outlet of Frick Pond at 5.0 miles. This is a good spot to stop and take some pictures of this pretty pond. The mountain to the right is Flynn’s Point the high point in Sullivan County. Continue on the red Quick Lake Trail back to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

frickflynnbiglog_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick Pond: Logger’s Loop, Big Rock and Flynn Trailsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.6 mi. 908 ft. GPSies

fricklogbigflynn_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. You will cross over the bridge at the outlet to Frick Pond. This is a beautiful spot to take pictures in all four seasons and under most lighting conditions. Continue around the pond and at about .7 miles there will be a trail junction. Bear to the right and walk around the “back” of the pond on an unnamed trail. You will cross over several wooden “bridges” or “causeways” over running water and marshy areas. BE CAREFUL as these wooden bridges are usually in the shade, grow moss readily and can be VERY SLIPPERY. After another .5 miles of walking you will be at Times Square, a four way trail junction. Continue straight ahead on the Big Rock Trail. This is the most challenging part of the hike at the trail gains about 650 feet of elevation over the next 1.1 miles. At the highest point on the Big Rock Trail there is a trail junction with the Flynn Trail. Turning left will take you to Hodge Pond. Turn right to go down the Flynn Trail and back to your car. The walk is about 1.7 miles but it is all down hill. When you approach the gate at the bottom of the trail, continue to follow the trail to the left into the woods. The cabin straight ahead is private property and may be occupied.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

fricklogbigflynn_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Hodge Ponds: Big Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 8.5 mi. 1260 ft. GPSies

fricklogbigflynn_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

fricklogbigflynn_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Hodge Ponds: Flynn Trail and Loggers Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.0 mi. 915 ft. GPSies

Frick and Hodge Ponds: Loggers Loop and Flynn Trailnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.9 mi. 860 ft. GPSies

frickhodgelogflynn_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. From the larger parking lot find the Quick Lake Trail to walk out toward Hodge Pond. At the first junction bear left to Frick Pond and cross over the bridge at the outlet to the pond. At the next junction the Quick Lake Trail bears left. Bear right around the back of the pond. You will encounter some wooden walkways that can be very slippery even when there is no ice. The next junction is Times Square at about 1.0 mile into the hike. Turn left on the yellow Logger’s Loop Trail to begin an a gentle ascent over the next 1.2 miles. At 2.25 miles you will be at Iron Wheel Junction where you will continue straight ahead on the red Quick Lake Trail. Over the next 1.5 miles you will gain about 435 feet in elevation to Junkyard Junction at the 3.7 mile mark. None of the climbing is very steep but it is continuous. At Junkyard Junction turn right on the blue Flynn Trail which is mostly flat with a descent ear the end. At the yellow gate bear to the right in the Flynn Trail and walk down to near the shore of Hodge Pond. Turn right and follow the Flynn Trail to the outlet end of Hodge Pond at about 4.5 miles. You may turn left and go around the back of the pond which has some nice views and adds only a little mileage to the hike. From the outlet continue on the Flynn Trail as it climbs to the highest point on the hike at the Big Rock Junction at the 5.2 mile mark. Continue straight ahead on the Flynn Trail which goes back DOWN to the parking area. Near the end of the trail just before the iron gate turn left into the woods and stay on the Flynn Trail. This avoids a small cabin which is usually occupied.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

frickhodgelogflynn_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


frickhodgeflynnlog_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Walk across the road to find the blue Flynn Trail. This trail begins to gain elevation immediately until you reach the Big Rock Trail junction at 1.7 miles. Continue straight ahead and then bear left at the next intersection to head down to Hodge Pond at 2.3 miles. Walk to the right of the pond and up a hill on an unmarked jeep trail. Continue around the back of the lake and watch for the blue markings of the Flynn Train appear on your right at about 2.85 miles.Turn right on the Flynn Trail and walk to Junkyard Junction at 3.4 miles. Turn left on the red Quick Lake Trail which begins a long descent to Iron Wheel Junction at 4.8 miles. Continue your hike by walking straight ahead on the yellow Logger’s Loop which descends to Times Square at 6.0 miles. Turn right to walk around the back of Frick Pond over a series of wooden walkways. The walkways pass over some very wet areas and are a great help but they can be VERY slippery. At the end of this short trail you will be back on the red Quick Lake trail and should turn left to the out let of Frick Pond at 6.6 Miles. From the bridge over the outlet turn right up the hill to follow the Quick Lake Trail back to your car. Just after the trail register be sure to turn right as the way straight ahead may take you to a private cabin.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

frickhodgeflynnlog_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Hodge Ponds: Quick Lake and Flynn Trails (back)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.2 mi. 1000 ft. GPSies

hodgecounter_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. After .25 miles the Big Rock Trail will branch to the right. Stay on the Quick Lake trail for another .85 miles to Iron Wheel Junction. Logger’s Loop is to the right. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail for another 1.6 miles to Junkyard Junction. Now turn right onto the blue-blazed Flynn Trail. As you approach Hodge Pond, you may turn left and walk around the back of the pond to walk to the outlet in .6 miles Take some time to look at all the little “wonders of nature” the pond has to offer. Face the pond at the outlet and turn 180 degrees to continue on the Flynn Trail. Walk .7 miles and the Big Rock Trail will come in on your right. Continue on the Flynn Trail for 1.7 miles until you are back at the Frick Pond Parking Area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

hodgecounter_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Hodge Ponds: Quick Lake and Flynn Trails (front)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.1 mi. 879 ft. GPSies

hodgecounterfront_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. After .25 miles the Big Rock Trail will branch to the right. Stay on the Quick Lake trail for another .85 miles to Iron Wheel Junction. Logger’s Loop is to the right. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail for another 1.6 miles to Junkyard Junction. Now turn right onto the blue-blazed Flynn Trail. As you approach Hodge Pond, turn right and you will be at the outlet after .4 miles. Take some time to look at all the little “wonders of nature” the pond has to offer. Face the pond at the outlet and turn 180 degrees to continue on the Flynn Trail. Walk .7 miles and the Big Rock Trail will come in on your right. Continue on the Flynn Trail for 1.7 miles until you are back at the Frick Pond Parking Area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

hodgecounterfront_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)

Frick and Hodge Ponds: Quick Lake and Flynn Trails (jeep)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.4 mi. 925 ft. GPSies


The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. After .25 miles a trail will branch to the right. Stay on the Quick Lake trail for another .85 miles to Iron Wheel Junction. The Logger’s Loop is to the right. Turn left to stay on the Quick Lake Trail for another 1.6 miles to Junkyard Junction. Now turn right onto the blue-blazed Flynn Trail. As you approach Hodge Pond, turn left to walk around the back of the pond on an old jeep road. On the other side of the road at about 4 miles turn left and walk up the hill. At the next junction turn right and follow the woods road back out to the Flynn Trail. At 4.4 miles turn left on the Flynn Trail. By 4.7 miles you will be at the junction with the Big Rock Trail on the right and a snowmobile Trail on the left. Continue on the Flynn Trail for 1.7 miles until you are back at the Frick Pond Parking Area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

(The image at the left shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)



Frick and Hodge Ponds: Mongaup Pondnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.6 mi. 1150 ft. GPSies

frickhodgemongaup_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop. If you turn left here, Frick pond is just .1 miles. Turn right on Logger’s Loop and follow it for .55 miles to Times Square. The name indicates that many trails cross at this point. Turn right here onto the yellow-blazed Big Rock Trail. Continue on this trail for 1.1 miles until it crosses the blue-blazed Flynn Trail. Several areas on Big Rock have significant but not severe climbs. Turn left on the Flynn Trail and hike .45 miles to Hodge Pond. From here retrace the last .45 miles on the Flynn Trail until the intersection with Big Rock Trail. Turn left onto the snowmobile trail and get ready for a short climb. This trail meanders for about 2.3 miles until it intersects the paved Loop Road at the Mongaup Pond State Campsite. Turn right on the loop road and walk about .75 miles to the gatehouse. Walk out the access road for about 1.1 miles and make a right on Beech Mountain Road. After .3 miles, you will be back at the Frick Pond Parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

frickhodgemongaup_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles arerelative!)

 

Frick and Hodge Ponds: Mongaup Pondnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.0 mi. 1100 ft. GPSies

frickaroundmongaup_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop. Turn left here and walk to Frick Pond which is just .1 miles away. Cross the bridge at the outlet to Frick Pond. At the next trail junction bear right to go around the pond on the yellow-blazed trail. Walk to the next trail junction which is called Times Square as several trails cross here. You will be about 1.2 miles into the hike. Continue straight ahead on the Big Rock Trail and get ready for an ascent to the Flynn Trail. Over the next the next 1.1 miles you will gain 580 feet to the junction with the Flynn Trail. Continue straight ahead on the snowmobile trail and gain another 150 to the top of the hill and a long descent. The trail now heads south then east and then north before turning southeast and then south until it meets the loop road at Mongaup Pond. When you reach the loop road you will be at 4.6 miles and will have lost 735 feet from the top of the hill. Turn right ion the loop road and head toward the entrance to the campgrounds about a mile away. Walk out the road for 1.1 miles to the intersection with Beech Mountain Road. Turn right and head up a small hill and back to your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

frickaroundmongaup_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Frick and Mongaup Ponds: Quick Lake and Big Rock Trailsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 8.5 mi. 1260 ft. GPSies

frickmongaup_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop. Turn left here and go to the bridge at the outlet Frick Pond. Cross the bridge and bear to the left at the trail junction to stay on the Quick Lake Trail. Continue on the Quick Lake trail to Iron Wheel Junction at 1.5 miles into the hike. Turn to the right to get on the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop Trail. The trail rolls some with a descent near the end. After 1.2 miles, you will be at Times Square. Turn left here at start up the Big Rock Trail which ascends 600 feet in 1.1 miles until it meets the Flynn Trail. Continue straight ahead on the snowmobile trail and continue your ascent to the highest point on the hike at about 2850 feet. The snowmobile trail now descends to the shore on Mongaup Pond. The distance “as the crow flies” is less than a mile but the trail is routed to avoid ledges that a snowmobile could not negotiate. Over 1.9 miles the trail drops about 700 feet. Turn right on the loop road and walk a mile to the gatehouse. Walk 1.1 miles to the junction with Beech Mountain road. Turn right and walk .25 miles back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

frickmongaup_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Friday Viewnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagithikerhalf_snagit 2.3 mi. 1500 ft. GPSies

Friday View_map From Grahamsville, turn onto Route 52A near the TriValley School. Stay on the road until the hamlet of Sundown where the road turns left. Bear to the right on Peekamoose Rd. and continue on the road looking for Moonhaw Rd. on the left. From Route 28, turn west on Route 28A and then head south. Turn right and head west on Watson Hollow Road, the road that goes to Peekamoose and Sundown. Watch for Moonhaw Road on the right after about mile. Turn onto Moonhaw Rd. and drive to the end. Park on the right just before the gates to the private driveway. Since this is a bushwhack all the way your route may vary. From the parking area, cross Wittenberg Brook and turn right to walk parallel to the brook on a woods road for about .1 miles. Turn left and UP the mountain. The climb will be steep no matter what route you pick and there will be some rock scrambles and some ledges to negotiate. As you climb be sure to stop occasionally and look behind you for views of Friday and Balsam Cap. You may even get a view of the cabin on the shoulder of Friday. Your views will depend on the season and the leaf coverage. As you near the top of the unnamed mountain the underbrush gets VERY thick. It is almost impossible to push across the ridge to the northwest. Continue north or a little northeast to drop down off the ridge. You may find a woods road or path on the other side. Walk about .4 miles or so and then head back up and over the ridge in a generally southwest direction. long this walk you may have views of Samuel’s Point. As you hit the top of the ridge push back through the brush and head for the edge of the ledges. Start to work your way down the hill north of your ascent route. This route is less steep and has less brush. You may find a woods road or two along the way. Once you are near Wittenberg Brook turn left or southeast to follow the brook back to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the anticlockwise hiking route.)
Friday View_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike.)


Giant Ledgenew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 3.2 mi. 1190 ft. GPSies

giant_map Park at the trailhead on the Frost Valley Road just after Winisook Lake on the hairpin turn. Find the yellow-blazed Phoenicia-East Branch trail and hike .65 miles to the blue-blazed Giant Ledge – Panther Mountain Trail. This ascent is rather gradual with a few short, steep areas thrown in. After about .75 miles, you reach Giant Ledge. Here there are a series of ledges that look to the east and offer a view of Wittenberg and Slide. The return hike simply reverses the trip out. The total distance is just over 3 miles making it perfect to get into shape.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)giant_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. This profile only reflects the hike out to Giant Ledge. The hike back is the same only in reverse; descending rather than ascending.)


Giant Ledge with bushwhacknew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 4.5 mi. 1437 ft. GPSies

giantledgebw_map Park at the trailhead on the Frost Valley Road just after Winisook Lake on the hairpin turn. Find the yellow-blazed Phoenicia-East Branch trail and hike .65 miles to the blue-blazed Giant Ledge – Panther Mountain Trail. This ascent is rather gradual with a few short, steep areas thrown in. After about .75 miles, you reach Giant Ledge. Here there are a series of ledges that look to the east and offer a view of Wittenberg and Slide. Continue on the trail until you are in the col, the lowest point between Giant Ledge and Panther. Turn right to begin your bushwhack and walk down the slope to an area of flat ground at the base of the ridges. This is an interesting place to explore. There are several wetlands areas that are interesting. You can work your way up to the base of the cliffs and even climb up on the debris below. Keep heading on a course parallel to the cliffs and you will soon be back on the main trail back to the car. . The total distance is just over 4.5 miles making it perfect to get into shape.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)
giantledgebw_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike.)


High Falls (Frost Valley)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 4.7 mi 915 ft GPSies

highfalls_map From the north or south use Ulster County Route 47, the Frost Valley Road, to drive to the Frost Valley YMCA Camp. The entire camp is private property that guests may hike without a fee. If you are not a guest, you may be asked to pay a day use fee. Obtain a trail map at the office. Walk the camp roads toward Lake Cole and pick up the blue Lake Cole Trail that passes between the lake and the main road. Walk to the end of Lake Cole and over the bridge across the dam. Pick up the yellow High Falls Trail and bear to the right where it splits. do NOT turn onto the red Line Shack Trail. The yellow High falls Trail ends at the blue Spring Ridge Trail but a path leads down to the falls which has an observation platform. If you are only interested in the falls, return the way you came. Walk back up the hill to the trail junction and turn left on the blue Spring Ridge Trail. Where the blue trail turns to the right bear to the left on the yellow Panhandle Trail. This is the first trail that gains any elevation as the rest are almost flat. The Panhandle Trail loops around to meet the red Line Shack Trail. When the blue Rocky Road Trail branches off to the left follow it downhill until it intersects the red Perimeter trail near the camp. Find some camp roads that will give you the most direct route back to your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)
highfalls_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Hodge Pondnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.1 mi. 850 ft. GPSies

hodge_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop. If you turn left here, Frick pond is just .1 miles. Turn right on Logger’s Loop and follow it for .55 miles to Times Square. The name indicates that many trails cross at this point. Turn right here onto the yellow-blazed Big Rock Trail. Continue on this trail for 1.1 miles until it crosses the blue-blazed Flynn Trail. Several areas on Big Rock have significant but not severe climbs. Turn left on the Flynn Trail and hike .45 miles to Hodge Pond. From here you can continue on the Flynn Trail until it meets the Quick Lake Trail. At this point turn left and hike back to Frick Pond. This adds quite a bit to the distance! Retrace the last .45 miles on the Flynn Trail until the intersection with Big Rock Trail. Continue straight ahead for 1.7 miles to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)
hodge_pro

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Hodge and Frick Ponds (Flynn and Quick Lake Trails)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.4 mi. 950 ft. GPSies

hodgefrick_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the blue-blazed Flynn Trail across the road and follow it for 1.7 miles to the junction with the Big Rock Trail. Continue straight ahead toward Hodge Pond. In a short distance a woods road bears to the right. You may continue straight ahead on the trail to the pond. Bear right and then take the next left down toward Hodge Pond. Take the next right to walk around the back of the pond. The next right will put you back on the Flynn Trail. Continue on the Flynn Trail to Junkyard Junction where the Flynn Trail ends at the Quick LAke Trail turn left and stay on the Quick Lake trail for 2.1 miles to the bridge at the outlet of Frick Pond. Along the way you will pas through Iron Wheel Junction. Here the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop Trail goes straight ahead. Bear to the right to stay on the red-blazed Quick Lake Trail. After walking over the bridge at Frick Pond continue for about another .5 miles back to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)
hodgefrick_pro

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Hodge and Frick Ponds (Lookout)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.7 mi. 1285 ft. GPSies

 

hodgefricklookout_mapThe area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous
possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”.
There is, however, some beautiful scenery.

Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road
splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the blue-blazed
Flynn Trail across the road and follow it for 1.7 miles to the junction with the Big Rock Trail. Continue straight ahead toward Hodge Pond. In a short distance a woods road bears to the right. You may continue straight ahead on the trail to the pond. Bear right and then at the next junction continue straight ahead and up the hill on a woods road. At about 2.7 miles watch for a trail that goes to the right as the road turns to the left. This area is above the spring house on the right of the road and is unmarked but very clear. Walk about a quarter mile to the large rock shelf that acts as a lookout over Hodge Pond. Trees have grown up to block the lookout so the best view is when there are no leaves on those trees. Turn around and follow your route back to the spot where you went straight ahead on the woods road up the hill. You will see some cabins on the right which are the remains of the Beech Mountain Boy Scout Camp. Continue straight ahead and take the next right that leads down toward Hodge Pond. Take the next right to walk around the back of the pond on an old Jeep trail. The next right will put you back on the Flynn Trail. Continue on the Flynn Trail to Junkyard Junction where the Flynn Trail ends at the Quick Lake Trail. Turn left and stay on the Quick Lake trail for 2.1 miles to the bridge at the outlet of Frick Pond. Along the way you will pass through Iron Wheel Junction. Here the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop Trail goes straight ahead. Bear to the right to stay on the red-blazed Quick Lake Trail. After walking over the bridge at Frick Pond continue for about another .5 miles back to the parking area.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the hiking route in a anticlockwise direction.)hodgefricklookout_pro(The image below shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)

 


Hodge and Frick Ponds (Quick Lake and Flynn Trails)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.4 mi. 950 ft. GPSies

hodgefrick_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the blue-blazed Flynn Trail across the road and follow it for 1.7 miles to the junction with the Big Rock Trail. Continue straight ahead toward Hodge Pond. In a short distance a woods road bears to the right. You may continue straight ahead on the trail to the pond. Bear right and then take the next left down toward Hodge Pond. Take the next right to walk around the back of the pond. The next right will put you back on the Flynn Trail. Continue on the Flynn Trail to Junkyard Junction where the Flynn Trail ends at the Quick LAke Trail turn left and stay on the Quick Lake trail for 2.1 miles to the bridge at the outlet of Frick Pond. Along the way you will pas through Iron Wheel Junction. Here the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop Trail goes straight ahead. Bear to the right to stay on the red-blazed Quick Lake Trail. After walking over the bridge at Frick Pond continue for about another .5 miles back to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)
hodgefrick_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Hodge and Frick Ponds (Flynn and Big Rock Trails)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.6 mi. 950 ft. GPSies

hodgefrickflynnbig_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the blue-blazed Flynn Trail across the road and follow it for 1.7 miles to the junction with the Big Rock Trail. Continue straight ahead toward Hodge Pond. In a short distance a woods road bears to the right. You may continue straight ahead on the trail to the pond. If you bear right, then take the next left and walk down toward Hodge Pond bearing to your left. Return the way you came to the Big Rock Trail junction. Turn right and head down the big Rock Trail to Times Square. Continue straight ahead around the back of Frick Pond. There are several wooden bridges and walkways here that can be very slippery when wet. Make a left on the Quick Lake Trail to continue around the pond. You will cross the bridge over the out let of the pond. Head up the small hill and bear right at the trail junction to get back to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in an anticlockwise direction.)
hodgefrickflynnbig_pro

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Hodge Pond: Big Rock and Loggers Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.5 mi. 1110 ft. GPSies

hodgebigrockloggers_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is relatively flat and there are only a few views. There is some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake Trail out of the main parking area. As you come out of the woods by the trail register, turn left on the woods road. After walking about .5 miles, you will be at a fork in the trail. Bear right onto the yellow-blazed Loggers Loop trail and head toward Times Square. At the trail junction known as Times Square, about 1 mile from the parking area, turn right on the red-blazed Big Rock Trail and get ready for a 1.1 mile climb of 600 feet to the junction with the Flynn Trail. Turn left on the blue-blazed Flynn Trail to head toward Hodge Pond. You will walk passed a gate on the trail and will arrive at another fork in the trail at about 2.4 miles. Bear to the right and walk a short distance to the area of the old Beech Mountain Boy Scout Camp where you will see some old buildings just ahead. Turn left and walk down to the jeep trail around Hodge Pond. Turn right and walk around the back of the pond. The next right will put you back on the blue-blazed Flynn Trail. Walk up a small hill and away from the pond to another gate. Walk passed the gate on the Flynn Trail until the trail ends where it meets the red-blazed Quick lake trail at Junkyard Junction. You will be about 3.7 miles into the hike. Turn left and walk down the Quick Lake trail until you get to Iron Wheel Junction at about 5.25 miles. Continue straight ahead on the yellow-blazed Loggers Loop. This trail continues mostly downhill and back to Times Square at about 6.5 miles. Continue straight ahead and retrace your earlier route to get back to the car.
(The map shows the parking area and the anticlockwise loop route.)

 

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Hodge Pond Lookoutnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.8 mi. 1020 ft. GPSies

hodgelookout_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is relatively flat and there are only a few views. There is some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the blue-blazed Flynn Trail across the road and follow it for 1.7 miles to the junction with the Big Rock Trail. Continue straight ahead toward Hodge Pond. In a short distance a woods road bears to the right. Bear right on the woods road. Shortly a trail will turn left and go down to Hodge Pond. Continue straight ahead and pass another woods road on the left. This road continues out to Shin Creek Road in Lew Beach. At this junction are some old cabins that are all that remains of the Beech Mountain Boy Scout Camp. Continue straight ahead and up the hill for about .5 miles. At 2.7 miles into the hike a woods road turns sharply to the right, climbs briefly and then levels off. Take this turn and continue walking until a large, pointed rock appears on the right. Walk just past the rock to a ledge that overlooks Hodge Pond and the hills to the west. By this time you will have hiked 2.9 miles. If you climb the ledges behind the lookout, you will be at the highest point in Sullivan County at just over 3100 feet. When you have taken in the site turns around and retrace your steps to the car. There are, of course, many other possible return routes that take in both Hodge and Frick Ponds.
(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

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Huckleberry Pointnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 4.4 miles 1165 ft. GPSies

huckleberrypt_map Turn onto Bloomer Rd. off Route 23A just west of Tannersville. At the Y in the road bear left onto Platte Clove Rd. Continue on this road passed the Platte Clove Community and the Platte Kill Preserve. Turn into the parking lot for Kaaterskill High Peak on your left. You may also access Platte Clove Road from the east in West Saugerties. Be aware that this road is “limited maintenance” and may be “closed” from late fall to early spring. At the parking area Look for the aqua-blazed Long Path or the darker blue markers. The “trail” here is really a very wide woods road that is traveled by local landowners. It is wide and easy to follow but may be rocky and muddy in places. Continue to follow the markers for about 1.05 miles where the yellow Huckleberry Point Trail goes off to the right. Turn here and continue on the trail. The initial part of this trail passes through and area that has stone piles and some deteriorated foundations which are evidence of how the land was once settled. At about .35 miles into the trail cross a small stream which can be high after heavy rains. The trail now begins to roll significantly with several ascents and descents. None of these are long or steep but they may surprise you. The trail also passes through a variety of hardwoods, evergreens and bushes. Several time you may think you are at the Point. After about 1 mile, the trail ends and you will be at Huckleberry Point. A series of rock ledges give views south the Overlook and Plattekill Mountains. The fire tower and TV antennae on Overlook can be seen. To the west is a view deep into Platte Clove. Looking down from these dizzying heights also reveals more of the Clove. To the east are views of the Hudson River. You may climb down the rock ledges for different views. Be careful since a fall from this elevation could be hazardous to your health. Some of the ledges are narrow with loose rock and little to hold onto. There is an informal trail that works its way to the east but few viewpoints are open. After enjoying all the views turn around and reverse your route back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back route.)
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(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative! Although this profile looks menacing, the elevation gains are seldom more than 50 ft!)


Huggins Lakenew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 3.6 mi. 900 ft. GPSies

hugginslake_map Head north from Livingston Manor on the Beaverkill Road. Watch for the signs for the Beaverkill State Campsites and turn left on Campsite Road. At the bottom of the hill turn right to go down to the river. Cross the Beaverkill on the historic covered Bridge. The road will intersect Berry Brook Road. Turn right on Berry Brook Road and drive 2 miles north to the parking area on the right. The trail is not marked but travels its entirety along a woods road. The walk is easy and the lake is in a pretty setting. The road rises gently for 1.2 miles and then turns to drop down to the lake. Walk to the dam for a good look at the lake. Snakes like to sun themselves on the concrete dam. There are informal paths around the lake which you can explore before returning to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)
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Jensen Ledgesnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 2.7 mi. 688 ft. GPSies

jensen_map From Route 97 near Hancock, NY turn south on Lordville Road near Somerset Lake. The road heads south to the Delaware River and crosses to Equinunk, PA. Just before the bridge crossing turn left on Bouchouxville Road. This dirt road becomes narrow and very rough but ends in a small parking area. From the parking area get on the woods road that heads east and up the ridge. As you climb, keep looking to your right for some views down to the river. After walking only .9 miles, you will cross a small stream that cascades down the ledges and empties into the river. If there is enough water volume, it is worth working your way down the side of the falls to get some pictures. Back on the main trail, cross the brook and walk a few hundred feet before turning right and walking out to the first viewpoint. At this viewpoint, you will have beautiful views down to the river and beyond. This area has a HUGE rock cairn that sits atop a “pile” of laid up stone! There may also be some stone “furniture” just behind the viewpoint is the remains of a stone quarry. Walk a little further east and there is another viewpoint. Retrace yours steps back down to the car. Walk along the trail down to the river along a private property easement. At the railroad tracks cross carefully and walk down to the river. After taking pictures, return to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)
jensen_pro

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Jockey Hillnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.7 mi. 662 ft. GPSies

 

jockeyhill_mapBluestone State Forest is near Kingston. There are two sets of trails in the area that are used for both hiking and mountain biking. There are three trail loops near Onteora Lake and another set of trails just east of Onteora Lake on Jockey Hill. Drive west on Route 28 from Kingston watching for Morey Hill Road on the right. Turn right on Morey Hill Road. Drive north until Morey Hill Road meets Sawkill Road. Turn right and watch for Jockey Hill Road on the right. Turn right to head south on Jockey Hill Road. Bear left when the road seems to split and you will be at the end of the paved road in what looks like a dead end. You may park on the side of the road or in the cul-de-sac. You may also continue on the dirt and gravel road marked Woods Road as this leads to the lower parking area and is NOT a private road. (The distance given here are from the upper parking area.) Walk down Woods Road about .5 miles to the lower parking area. Continue straight ahead and out the far end of the parking area passing a gate. This is where the yellow blazes start. The trail follows the woods roads to about .7 miles or .15 miles from the lower parking area. Here the trail turns left into the woods. The trail parallels the road through mixed evergreen and hardwood forests for the next .65 miles rolling some but mostly descending. At 1.3 miles the trail turns left 90 degrees changing from southeast to northeast. The hiking now is mostly through hardwood forest and at 1.6 miles the trail spilts to the start of the loop. Stay to the left and descend slightly before turning east at 2.0 miles and beginning a climb. The climb looks impressive on a contour profile but it lasts only to about 2.6 miles and gains just 175 feet! At this point the trail does a funny little loop to the north to avoid a rather steep descent over some rocks. Soon you will be headed south to about 3.2 miles. At his point another trail or road goes off to the left. It is important to follow the blazes since there are many of these woods roads and paths that cross the blazed trail. The trail turns west first heading northwest and then southwest to walk around a small private inholding. At 3.4 miles the trail passes over the highest elevation on the hike at 600 feet. From here it begins to descend until you are back at the start of the loop at 4.2 miles. Continue to follow the blazes or hike out to the road at 4.5 miles. Walking the road back offers a different experience. It is about .75 miles back to the lower parking area and then another .5 miles back to your car.

(The map above shows the parking area and “lollipop” hiking route.)

jockeyhill_pro
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Kelly Hollownew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 3.7 mi. 667 ft. GPSies

kellyhollow_map From NYC Route 9/10 on the south side of the Pepacton Reservoir take the Millbrook Arena Road southeast for about 5 miles. Watch for the trailhead sign for Kelly Hollow on the right. Pull into the small lot and park. The trail begins at the back of the parking area just beyond the kiosk. The entire trail network is marked as a cross country ski trail with yellow markers. As you enter the forest, follow the yellow markers to the left. This trail heads south and southeast for about 1.2 miles gaining some elevation as you go. The trail parallels a brook which may be almost dry or a rushing torrent depending on the season. This part of the trail is mostly a wide woods road. At 1.2 miles the trail turns almost 180 degrees and heads north and then southwest until about 2 miles. The overall effect takes you west but avoids an ascent and descent over a shoulder of Millbrook Ridge. This part of the trail is more trail than road and leads to an area where there is lean-to. At the lean-to is a pit privy and a beaver pond. After the lean-to, the trail loops around the pond and then heads south back to the Millbrook Road. This part of the trail is again a woods road in most places and parallels a branch of the stream. In one area a nice waterfall depends largely on seasonal rainfall. Just before you get to the road there will be a historic cemetery on your left. Walk out to the road and turn right. Walk about .25 miles back to the parking area. The whole trip is under 4 miles. There is a route marked “Short Loop”.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in clockwise direction.)
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Kelly Hollow and Millbrook Ridgenew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.6 mi. 1705 ft. GPSies

Kelly Hollow and Millbrook Ridge_map From NYC Route 9/10 on the south side of the Pepacton Reservoir take the Millbrook Arena Road southeast for about 5 miles. Watch for the trailhead sign for Kelly Hollow on the right. Pull into the small lot and park. The trail begins at the back of the parking area just beyond the kiosk. The entire trail network is marked as a cross country ski trail with yellow markers. Start to the left up the more eastern trail which eventually leads to the beaver pond. The trail crosses a small stream and then passes through a gate as it follows an old woods road. After only .3 miles a road heads down toward the stream. It is not a marked trail but follow it down to the stream bed. There are unmarked paths on both sides of the stream. You can cross to the other side depending on the height and width of the water. Walk up the near side and take some pictures if you like. In some places the path may be almost blocked by trees and debris but you can find a way around them in each case. At about .8 miles, you may see a falls ahead and one on a small tributary to the the left. Walk across the stream which will be smaller now and then walk over to the tributary to the falls. Walk back to the main stream where the falls forms a lower, smaller drop and an upper, higher drop. Shortly after this you will find a bridge across the stream that is part of the short loop. Take the trail up to the western branch of the main trail and start southwest and then south toward the beaver pond. The trail gains some elevation as it goes. The pond has a substantial dam and a beaver lodge. There is a lean-to with a privy near the outlet. Head down the trail toward the parking area and look for some nice view to the west of the hills beyond. On the right a hill or ridge rises from the trail. This is Millbrook Ridge that separates Kelly Hollow from the area near Alder Lake! Turn right or south-southwest and start UP the hill. The climb to the top of the ridge is about 1 mile but there is an 1100 foot elevation gain! There are at least three places where the land levels making you believe you are at the top. Sadly there mare few views along the way and the summit is a broad wooded plateau without much to see. At the top Alder lake will be to the southwest with Beecher Lake to the southeast. One at the top turn around and follow your route back to the main trail. Turn right on the main trail and walk back to the parking area. The trail crosses the stream again and then passes through several groves of large evergreen trees.
(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in anticlockwise direction.)

Kelly Hollow and Millbrook Ridge_pro
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Lake Superior State Parknew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 4.2 mi. 432 ft. GPSies

lakesuperior_map From Route 17B between Monticello and Fosterdale or County Route 55 between White Lake and Eldred turn on Dr. Duggan Road. From 17B the parking area will be passed the main entrance for Lake Superior State Park and on your right. From 55 the parking area will be before the main entrance for Lake Superior State Park and on your left. Park and walk to the left of the pavilion and into a field at the top of the hill. Walk across the field to Indian Field Road and turn right. There will be POSTED signs on your left but none on the right. Watch for POSTED signs to appear on your right and turn into the woods on a woods road just before the signs start. This is the Rocky Run Road which is part of the old Newburgh-Cochecton Turnpike. Walk along the wide woods road keeping the POSTED signs on your left for about 2 miles to the paved Pucky Huddle Road. Turn right on the road and walk several hundred feet to where Mallory Brook crosses under the road. The rest of the hike is a bushwhack down the brook and along the lake shore. You may return the way you came on the woods road or continue on the “whack”. Walk along the brook on the left side since the right has some rather steep cliffs in places. You may find a woods road or a path to use. Cross the brook before you get to the lakeshore as it begins to get wider there. Walk along the sore of the lake remembering to stop to take pictures when you like. You may find several places where people have pulled up a boat and camped. The stands of laurel near the lake may be thick and hard to push through at times so just walk further away from the shore. As you work your way closer to the outlet, you will see the beach on the opposite shore. You will also find more defined paths to walk on. At the outlet of the lake continue on the path that parallels the swampy brook that connects Lake Superior to the small pond where you parked. Keep an eye out for blue heron and beavers. You have the opportunity to take the “low road” around the shore of the pond or the “high road” on the ridge above the pond. Once at the dam at the lower end of the pond you will be a stone’s throw from the parking area and your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in clockwise direction.)
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Little Pond Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagit 2.8 mi. 330 ft. GPSies

littlepond_map Take the Beaverkill Road from Livingston Manor and drive for about twenty minutes to the intersection with Barkaboom Rd. Drive up the Barkaboom Rd and park near the start of the access road to Little Pond State Park. When the park is open, be careful not to block the entrance. During the winter, parking here is not a problem as long as it is plowed and you do not block the access for snow plowing. Walk up the access road and around the pond on the hiking trail in either direction. Walk back down the access road to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in an out and back and anticlockwise direction.)
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Little Pond to Berry Brook Roadnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 10.4 mi. 3150 ft. GPSies

Little Pond to Berry Brook_map From Roscoe, drive north on Route 206 for about 3 miles. Turn right on Berry Brook/Holiday Brook Road and rive another 7.5 miles to the parking area for the Mary Smith Trail on the right. Leave one car here then drive to the end of the road and turn right on Route 30. When Route 30, turns left and crosses the bridge, turn right on the NYC roads. Drive about 2 miles and then turn right on Barkaboom Road. Drive almost to the end of Barkaboom Road to the access road for the Little Pond State Campsites. Park near the start of the access road to Little Pond State Campsites when the campsites are closed. When the campsites are open, drive up to the campsites, pay the fee and park in the lot.This description includes mileages from the beginning of the access road. Subtract 1 mile if you park in the parking area at the campsites. From the bathrooms at the campsite walk on the loop trail on the north side of the lake to the head or inlet end of the lake. Turn right on the yellow Little Pond trail and walk 1.2 miles to the junction with the red Touch-Me-Not Trail. There is a nice viewpoint near the top of the Little Pond Trail. There is the foundation of an old house in this area and it seems this would be a beautiful spot to have a house although the access would be difficult! At the junction with the red Touch-Me-Not Trail turn left to climb Cabot Mountain. In the spring, summer and fall this climb is punctuated by nettles and prickers. In the winter, there is usually a lot of snow or a layer of thick ice. Eventually you will run out of “up” and you will be on the flat part of the trail that winds across the top of Cabot. At 3.6 miles there is a viewpoint on the left over Little Pond. You will have already gained 1150 feet from the car with the 480 feet over the last .5 miles on the climb up Cabot. The average grade in this climb is 25%! Walk across the flat area on Cabot and then begin the first descent. After the first short descent, we walk across another flat area and then began the long, steep descent to Beech Hill Road. From the highest point on Cabot Mountain you will have hiked 1.25 miles and dropped 700 feet! You will now be 4.7 miles into the hike and should turn right and walk .2 miles on Beech Hill Road. Turn left on a private road and walk a short distance before turning left up the trail. You are now on the Middle Mountain Trail and climbing up Beech Hill. Many times on the hike you will climb to the “top” of a hill only to find that it is a false summit and there is more climbing to do. The walk up Beech Hill is like this with a little rise just before the actual summit. The walk from the private road to the summit of Beech Hill is about .6 miles and gains about 460 feet along the way. You will now descend Beech Hill so that you can ascend Middle Mountain! It is about .7 miles between the two summits but you drop 150 feet to then climb 280 feet to get to the top of Middle Mountain. At this point you will have hiked 6.25 miles and are ready for the descent down Middle Mountain to parking area on Mary Smith Hill Road. The descent down Middle Mountain is about 1 mile and you drop 730 feet to the parking area. You are now ready to start the last section of the trail having already hiked 7.25 miles. The first .4 miles of the Mary Smith Trail averages a 24% grade gaining 480 feet. You will continue the climb to near the top of an unnamed hill that is higher than Mary Smith Hill. The trail actually never hits the top of this hill but travels along the north shoulder but still gets above 2900 feet. The summit of the hill is well over 2900 feet making it almost as high as Cabot and Middle Mountains! From the high point descend a little over 250 feet over the next mile to the base of Mary Smith Hill which is your last major climb. At about 9.3 miles you may want to stop at the Middle Mountain Lookout for some nice views.You will next hit the highest point of 2700 feet on Mary Smith Hill with only a downhill portion to complete the hike. At the bottom of the descent you are only .25 miles from the parking area. Although the drive back to your other car is annoying, at least you are driving and not walking!

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in an out and back and anticlockwise direction.)
Little Pond to Berry Brook_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Long Path: Woodland Valley to Phoenicianew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.1 mi. 2180 ft. GPSies

newlpwv_map The Long Path currently extends from Fort Lee, NJ to John Thatcher park near Albany, NY. Plans exist to continue the trail north to Lake Placid. In someplace the trail contains long walks on public roads. Efforts are being made to relocate these sections to existing trails or to create new trails. The section represented here is not complete yet. It will extend from near the junction of the trail to Terrace Mountain on the Wittenberg Trail over Cross Mountain, Mount Pleasant, and Rohmer Mountain to Phoenicia. Park at the Woodland Valley Campsites on Woodland Valley Road being sure to pay the parking fee during the season. Head across the road to the bridge that crosses the creek. Be ready for an immediate climb as you make your way up the trail to Wittenberg Mountain. Over the next 1.9 miles from the bridge you will gain almost 1400 feet before the trail begins to level off. Even after the trail is no longer climbing continuously there will be several ups and downs. At 2.5 miles you will be at the junction with the trail to Terrace Mountain and a lean-to to the left. Turn right and walk about .2 miles to a large tree across the trail which has been cut and the center section moved. Look into the woods on your left for orange flagging. Once the trail is completed it will extend out to the main trail and be prominently marked. Follow the flagging for as far as you like and then turn around. The flagging may change to pink in wetlands areas. Pink flagging may also lead to a trail crew camp. If you park a car at the other end of the trail you should be able to follow the flagging through to Route 28 near Phoenicia. This is a bushwhack for much of the way so be prepared with maps and compass. During the summer of 2013 you may meet crews from the trail conference who are working to complete this project by the fall of 2013.
(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

newlpwv_pro

(The image shows the profile of the out and back hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Long Pond: Basily Road from Flugertown Rdnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 6.0 mi. 578 ft. GPSies

longoutback_map The area around Long Pond has several snowmobile trails that are ideal for hiking. They are wide and well maintained being free from blow downs. I am looking forward to snow shoeing this area during the winter. There are several options for longer or shorter hikes. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about nine miles then turn left on Flugertown Rd. just passed the hamlet of Willowemoc. The parking area for Long Pond is about 1 mile up on the right. The road is well paved. The first part of the trail is a short ascent. It looks a LOT steeper on the profile below than it really is! After about a mile, you can turn right and walked down to the pond. This is the nicest view of the pond that is right on the trail. Another .25 miles will bring you to a T. Left goes out to Flugertown Rd. and right leads to the lean-to and the other trails. If you like, turn right and walk about .65 miles to the lean-to. If you are so inclined, skip the lean-to and go straight ahead. After about a mile the trail intersect Basily Road. Turn left and follow the road. At the next intersection continue straight ahead and down a hill. Do NOT turn right as this leads toward Black Bear Road at Round Pond. After about half a mile you will be at the beaver pond. If the pond is low enough continue on and make a left onto Flugertown Road at the intersection. Follow this back to the parking area. If the pond is too high, turn around and retrace your steps to the car. Several variations are available.
(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

longoutback_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative! This trail does have a little climb at the beginning and a slight descent at the end but the rest is almost flat!)


Long Pond: Basily Road to Flugertown Road Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.0 mi. 597 ft. GPSies

longloop_map The area around Long Pond has several snowmobile trails that are ideal for hiking. They are wide and well maintained being free from blow downs. There are several options for longer or shorter hikes. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about nine miles then turn left on Flugertown Rd. just passed the hamlet of Willowemoc. The parking area for Long Pond is about 1 mile up on the right. The road is well paved. The first part of the trail is a short ascent. It looks a LOT steeper on the profile below than it really is! After about a mile, you can turn right and walked down to the pond. This is the nicest view of the pond that is right on the trail. Another .25 miles will bring you to a T. Left goes out to Flugertown Rd. and right leads to the lean-to and the other trails. If you like, turn right and walk about .65 miles to the lean-to. If you are so inclined, skip the lean-to and go straight ahead. After about a mile the trail intersect Basily Road. Turn left and follow the road. At the next intersection continue straight ahead and down a hill. So NOT turn right as this leads toward Black Bear Road at Round Pond. After about half a mile you will be at the beaver pond. Cross the shallow water here in any way you like. Walking across the dam may work. At this point you may well be on private land. Head for the bridge across the field. The bridge is actually private and you should cross at the “ford” just to the left of the bridge. The water here is a little wider and deeper than at the beaver pond! After crossing the creek. stay on Basily Road which at this point is unpaved. It is a little over two miles back to the parking area. Eventually Basily becomes Flugertown and the road is paved. Several pull-offs and small parking areas mark places where the snowmobile trails intersect the road.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

longloop_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative! This trail does have a little climb at the beginning and a slight descent at the end but the rest is almost flat!)


Long Pond: Flugertown Road to Basily Road Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.0 mi. 562 ft. GPSies

Long Pond (Big Loop reversed)_map The area around Long Pond has several snowmobile trails that are ideal for hiking. They are wide and well maintained being free from blow downs. There are several options for longer or shorter hikes. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about nine miles then turn left on Flugertown Rd. just passed the hamlet of Willowemoc. The parking area for Long Pond is about 1 mile up on the right. The road is well paved. Start by walking out of the parking area and turning right to head north on Flugertown Road passing by some open fields and some streams that cross the road. The road changes from pavement to gravel and at 1.6 miles a snowmobile trail to the right leads to Long Pond. In this same area the Willowemoc-Hardenburgh Trail meets the road. Continue on the road and at some point the name officially changes to Basily Road. At 2.4 miles the road descends and turns right to cross a creek on a private bridge near the Peter’s hunting camp. The owners have opened the bridge to hiking and snowmobile traffic so please respect their property. Cross the field and head toward the swampy area and beaver pond on the other side. Around 3.1 miles Basily Road bears left but you should bear right on a snowmobile trail. A little further along at 3.5 miles a road continues straight ahead but you should follow the snowmobile trail by bearing to the right. A spur trail to the Long Pond lean-to branches to the left at 4.2 miles. You may visit the lean-to but there are no views. To get the best views of the pond turn left on an unmarked path at 4.8 miles and walk down to the shores of the pond. The north end of the pond has some of the oldest bogs in the Catskills approaching 14,000 years. During the spring and summer winged blackbirds can be seen in the reeds. Back on the main trail walk up a short hill and then down the hill to your car. This last 1.2 miles section goes quickly.
(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

Long Pond (Big Loop reversed)_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Long Pond: Black Bear to Flugertownnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 4.9 mi. 532ft. GPSies

longbearflugertown_map The area around Long Pond has several snowmobile trails that are ideal for hiking. They are wide and well maintained being free from blow downs. There are several options for longer or shorter hikes. This hike requires two cars OR you make park a car at either end and double the mileage! Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about fourteen miles then turn left on Black Bear Rd. near Round Pond. The parking area is up the hill on the right. The first part of the hike is on Basily Road which is seasonally maintained. After about 1.15 miles the road turns into a woods road which is also a snowmobile trail. From this point on the walking is almost flat or downhill! At about 2 miles into the hike you will come to a T. Turn left at the T and the woods road become more of a trail. At 2.15 miles there is a spur trail to thee left that goes to the lean-to. At 3.55 miles there will be a trail junction. Bearing right will take you out to Flugertown Road and back to your car. Bear left and continue on the trail to the parking area on Flugertown Road.
(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

longbearflugertown_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative! This trail does have a little climb at the beginning and a slight descent at the end but the rest is almost flat!)


Long Pond: Flugertown Rd to Mongaup Pondnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 9.8 mi. 2210 ft. GPSies

longmongaup_map Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about nine miles then turn left on Flugertown Rd. just passed the hamlet of Willowemoc. After 1.3 miles, the road turns to gravel. Go another 1.1 miles and park somewhere along the edge of the road. There are no formal parking areas here but there are enough areas to park a few cars. The trail begins on the left side of the road. Depending on where you parked, you may have to walk one way or the other to find the trail. The trail begins as a gradual uphill through some pine forest and after .5 miles the red marked Long Pond Beaverkill trail goes to the right and the yellow marked Mongaup Willowemoc trail heads left. The latter is the shorter way to Mongaup and by far the easier walk. Turn right on the red marked trail. This trail wanders back and forth and up and down through hardwood forest and pine trees. Several areas are almost completely overgrown with briars making it slow going and difficult at times. There are a few areas of nettles. During wetter times the trail sports several muddy areas. About halfway up the trail to the Mongaup Hardenburgh Trail, you will pass Sand Pond on your right. You will never know it though since the trail has no views at all. The trail begins an ascent near its end to gain elevation to the Mongaup Ridge. After about 3 miles, the trail ends on the Mongaup Ridge at the blue marked Mongaup Hardenburgh Trail. Turn left here toward Mongaup Pond Campsites. This trail is a little more used but the markers are few and far between. Also, there are several steep descents and ascents along the way as the trail ascends the various Mongaup Mountains. There are even several switchbacks! After 3.3 miles, the trail turns right at Mongaup Pond. Turn left here on the wide snowmobile trail. Cross four wooden bridges. After the fourth look for the well-marked yellow-blazed Mongaup Willowemoc Trail on your right. Turn here. This is also a snowmobile trail so it is wide and fairly well groomed with some blowdowns across the path in some areas. At abut 1.7 miles a large wooden bridge crosses Butternut Creek. This creek flows well even in drier weather and has some beautiful areas along its banks. From this point it is about 1.1 miles back to the junction with the Long Pond Beaverkill Trail. On the way several woods roads and trail cross the one you are on. Ignore these and stay on the yellow marked trail. At the trail junction, turn right and hike the .5 miles back to the car.
(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

longmongaup_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Long Pond: Flugertown Rd to Mongaup Pond Loop (clockwise)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 9.8 mi. 2225 ft. GPSies

longmongaupclock_map Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about nine miles then turn left on Flugertown Rd. just passed the hamlet of Willowemoc. After 1.3 miles, the road turns to gravel. Go another 1.1 miles and park somewhere along the edge of the road. There are no formal parking areas here but there are enough areas to park a few cars. The trail begins on the left side of the road. Depending on where you parked, you may have to walk one way or the other to find the trail. The trail begins as a gradual uphill through some pine forest and after .5 miles the red marked Long Pond Beaverkill Trail goes to the right and the yellow marked Mongaup Willowemoc trail heads left. The latter is the shorter way to Mongaup and by far the easier walk. Turn left on the yellow marked trail. The hiking trail in this area is also a snowmobile trail so it is wide and well-maintained with no blowdowns to block your path. Soon you will cross the private road to Sand Pond and then hit a low point as you crossed Butternut Creek, the outlet to Sand Pond. Walk along the creek for a short distance and then cross one of the sturdy bridges at around 1.5 miles. After the creek, the trail begins an ascent of over 400 feet before descending to the shores of Mongaup Pond. There are some rocky sections along the way. A hike of 3.2 miles brings you to the trail around Mongaup Pond where you should turn right to head toward the upper end of the pond and the Mongaup Hardenburgh Trail. The trail around the pond is always wet and usually muddy in spots. After about .5 miles watch for the blue Mongaup Hardenburgh Trail on your right. The Mongaup Hardenburgh Trail ascends the Mongaup Mountains and the climb is interesting in spots. The first part of the trail to Middle Mongaup Mountain is well marked and maintained. For 1.5 miles the trail heads almost directly north gaining over 800 feet to the top of Middle Mongaup Mountain. There are some steep but short climbs along the way but at 5.1 miles you will be at the summit which is just under 3000 feet. When you start down the other side of the mountain and you may notice that the trail is less distinct, less well marked and that there are quite a few blowdowns on the trail. After descending over 400 feet and you will regain almost all of that to reach the top of East Mongaup Mountain at 6.2 miles. There is another short descent and ascent to get to the trail junction with the Long Pond Trail back to the car. At 6.9 miles look for the turn which has no sign and only some faded red markers. Once you turn onto the Long Pond Trail you may find that there had been little maintenance on the trail in some time. There are some major blockages and some areas have few markers to guide the way. Any area exposed to sun will have untamed prickers in a tangled mass across the trail. In several places the blowdowns and the poor marking combine to make the trail hard to follow. Some parts of the trail become more like a bushwhack! From trail junction to trail junction you drop 850 feet in 2.5 miles. When you hit the junction with the Mongaup Willowemoc Trail, turn left to descend the last .5 miles back to Flugertown Road.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

longmongaupclock_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Long Pond: Flugertown Rd to Round Pondnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 10.4 mi. 855 ft. GPSies

longround_map Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about nine miles then turn left on Flugertown Rd. just passed the hamlet of Willowemoc. Drive up the road and watch for the trailhead Parking area on the right. Get on the snowmobile and cross a bridge. The trail rises for the first .6 miles and then drops slightly until, at 1 mile there is a short side trail to the right. Walk down to Long Pond to see a small but pretty pond. The north end of the pond has some of the oldest bogs in the Catskills dating back 14,000 years to the time the last glacier receded. Back on the main trail walk another .2 miles to the junction with the red Long Pond-Beaverkill Range Trail. The trail flattens out and at 2.5 miles the trail meets a woods road. Around 2.9 Niles the trail turns right as it meets Basily Road. The trail on Basily Road rises slightly and then, at .3 miles, begins a serious drop down to a trail head on Black Bear (Wild Meadow) Road. At the road make a right and continue down to Pole Road at 5.4 miles. Turn right on Pole Road and begin a long 4.1 mile walk back to Flugertown Road. Turn right on Flugertown Road and walk .85 miles back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

longround_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Long Pond: Flugertown Rdnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 5.0 mi. 476 ft. GPSies

longpond_map The area around Long Pond has several snowmobile trails that are ideal for hiking. They are wide and well maintained being free from blow downs. I am looking forward to snow shoeing this area during the winter. There are several options for longer or shorter hikes. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about nine miles then turn left on Flugertown Rd. just passed the hamlet of Willowemoc. The parking area for Long Pond is about 1 mile up on the right. The road is well paved. The first part of the trail is a short ascent. It looks a LOT steeper on the profile below than it really is! After about a mile, you can turn right and walked down to the pond. This is the nicest view of the pond that is right on the trail. Another .25 miles will bring you to a T. Left goes out to Flugertown Rd. and right leads to the lean-to and the other trails. Turn right and walk about .65 miles to the lean-to. Be sure to make the turn onto the spur trail to the lean-to. It is clearly marked but missing it leads to a VERY long walk. After the lean-to, retrace your steps to the T and continue straight ahead for about .6 miles to the road. The trail winds some but is well marked and is downhill all the way. Take a left on Flugertown Rd. and walk the 1.5 miles back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

longpond_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative! This trail does have a little climb at the beginning and a slight descent at the end but the rest is almost flat!)


Long Pond Ironworksnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 4.4 mi. 745 ft. GPSies

lpironworks_map This trail in Hewitt, New Jersey traces the Hansclever Iron Trail near the Monksville Reservoir. It is rich in history. Take the Greenwood Lake Turnpike east from the intersection with Lakeside Road at the south end of Greenwood Lake. Drive a little more than three miles east and park at the visitor’s center for the Long Pond Iron works. There are some groomed paths to the left of the visitor’s center that wander between some historic building. Watch for thee blue blazes of the Sterling Ridge Trail which runs in conjunction with the Highlands Trail. At about .45 miles the trail turns right and crosses the Wanaque Reservoir on a bridge. Before making the turn be sure to inspect the ruins of the iron furnaces that dates back to the American Revolution! When you cross the river bear to the right on the yellow Hasenclever Iron Trail. This trail follows one of the routes used to transport iron ore from the mines to the furnace. Along the trail you will find placards explaining some of the historic spots. At abbot miles you will walk1 up a hill and a woods road turns to the left. Make the turn and continue northwest on the road until about 2.5 miles. In this Rae you will find the PAtterson Mine. Watch for “rusty” rocks which are the tailing from the mines. There will be one or two shallow pits on the left of the road. On the right side of the road there are two or three deeper pits and a trench. Be careful around these since they are often filled with water and the sides are unstable. Back on the road continue to walk downhill until 2.8 miles when the woods road meets the Sterling Ridge Trail. Turn left on the trail to get back to the parking area. Along the way the trail parallels the Wanaque River which is a popular swimming area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

lpironworks_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Mary Smith: Berry Brook Road to Mary Smith Hill Roadnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 6.3 mi. 1949 ft. GPSies

marysmithbb_map Head north on the Beaverkill Road for about 5.2 miles and turn left on Capmsite Road. At the fork in the road bear right and cross the Beaverkill Covered Bridge. At the intersection with Berry Brook Road turn right and drive another 3.7 miles to the parking area on the right. The first .6 miles of the trail are pretty steep gaining a little over 500 feet. The surface has some loose rocks which can slip underfoot. After climbing to the top of the first, unnamed hill you will descend a little before starting up Mary Smith Hill. At .9 miles the trail makes a sharp right turn swinging from ENE to SE and then ascending Mary Smith Hill. You will walk through several areas where you pass between or climb over large rocks. Just before the top of Mary Smith Hill there is a lookout which has a limited view to the south. Continue on the main trail little farther along the trail to the top of the next unnamed hill. As you continue on the trail to Mary Smith Road you will drop 685 feet in less than a mile. If you have a car waiting on Mary Smith Hill Road, you will not have to deal with the return climb. If you are doing and out and back hike be ready to climb back up the hill from Mary Smith Hill Road on your way back to your car on Berry Brook Road.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

marysmithbb_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike.)


Mary Smith: Mary Smith Hill Road to Berry Brooknew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 6.3 mi. 1949 ft. GPSies

marysmith_map Turn onto Mary Smith Hill Road in the hamlet of Lew Beach. Travel for about 2.5 miles and park at the parking area on the right. Do NOT be fooled! The road narrows and changes to dirt but IS passable. Get on the red blazed Mary Smith Trail across the road. Be prepared to climb some rather steep terrain in the first half to three quarters of a mile. At the half mile point is a nice lookout to the south. Continue on to the maximum elevation on the trail at a little over 2900 feet. This hill has no name. Descend into a col and then climb to the top of Mary Smith Hill. Here there is another lookout to the south. Continue down the other side of Mary Smith Hill to the parking area on Berry Brook Road. There are some interesting rock formations along the way and at least one rather steep descent. In the summer, the trail is overgrown with briars. The briars coupled with nettles make the trip over the hill unpleasant if not impossible. At Berry Brook Road turn around and retrace your steps. The round trip is 6.6 miles by the signs and 6.3 miles by my GPS.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)
marysmith_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike.)


Mary Smith: Berry Brook to Split Rocknew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 2.6 mi. 760 ft. GPSies

splitrock_map This short hike doesn’t gain much elevation but leads to a nice lookout and an interesting rock formation. Head out of Roscoe on Route 206. Turn right on Berry Brook Road just after the county line and drive for around 8 miles to the trail head parking on the right. Cross the road to get on the MAry Smith Trail heading west southwest. After about .1 miles on a woods road, you will cross a power line right-of-way. Watch for the trail as it continues through a grassy area and into the woods. The trail ascends some until about .45 miles when it levels off if only briefly. In only .2 miles the trail again ascends for the next .5 miles to 1.15 miles where it meets the Pelnor Hollow Trail. Turn right and after a short distance you will be faced with a VERY STEEP downhill section. At 1.3 miles you will arrive at the Split Rock Lookout with some great views to the west. Notice the house across the way on the ridge. When you have taken in the view, return the way you came. This time the steep downhill is a steep uphill!

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

splitrock_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Middle Mountain Trail: Mary Smith to Beech Hillnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 4.2 mi. 1750 ft. GPSies

middlemt_map Turn onto Mary Smith Hill Road in the hamlet of Lew Beach. Travel for about 2.5 miles and park at the parking area on the right. Do NOT be fooled! The road narrows and changes to dirt but IS passable. Get on the red blazed Middle Mountain trail. Be prepared to climb! This isn’t a 3500 and it is only 4.2 miles round trip but there is some climbing to do. About a miles walk brings you to the top of Middle Mountain at 2975 feet. There is nothing much to see here but .1 miles further on is a BEAUTIFUL view. Continue on the same trail for a little less than a mile to Beech Hill. There is a descent and ascent between the two hills. Another half mile will put you on Beech Hill Road. Return to your car by reversing the hike.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

middlemt_pro

(The image shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Middle Mountain Trail: Mary Smith Hill Road to Cabot Mtnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 7.8 mi. 2660 ft. GPSies

marysmithcabot_map Turn onto Mary Smith Hill Road in the hamlet of Lew Beach. Travel for about 2.5 miles and park at the parking area on the right. Do NOT be fooled! The road narrows and changes to dirt but IS passable. From the parking area get on the red blazed Middle Mountain trail. Be prepared to climb! This isn’t a 3500 but it is a true Catskills trail with rocks, roots, prickers, nettles, damp places, wet spots and blowdown! The climb up Middle Mountain gets steep in a few places and there are several large trees across the trail and many smaller branches. Between .5 miles and .6 miles the trail winds its way up over a rocky patch. At the top of the climb the trail levels and makes a big switchback before heading back toward the summit. From the summit of Middle Mountain the trail loses almost 300 feet to the col with Beech Hill. The climb to Beech Hill isn’t long but can be tiring. In .6 miles the trail drops over 500 feet and ends on a small private road. Turn right on the road and walk out to Beech Hill Road. Turn right at the end of the road and walk to the trail head for the Touch Me Not Trail to Cabot Mountain. You now have to walk 2.5 miles over hilly, rough trail. The hike up Cabot starts along a woods road with POSTED signs on both sides. The first .25 miles aren’t bad but then the trail gets serious. The trail gets steep in spots. In .5 miles the trail ascends about 600 feet and then levels off for a pleasant walk of .35 miles to the last climb. Ascend another 125 feet over the next .3 miles to get to the summit before turning around to walk back. The hike back is a matter of reversing course along the same trails. You get a break hiking down Cabot Mountain and then walking along a relatively flat area to the foot of Beech Hill. At the foot of Beech Hill you will be 6.2 miles into the hike. Start the climb up Beech Hill and then head down Beech Hill to the col with Middle Mountain. Continue up to the highest point the trail reaches on Middle Mountain and soon you will be going down Middle Mountain, through the switchback, over the rocks and toward the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

marysmithcabot_pro

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Mongaup Hardenburgh Trail from Beaverkillnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.7 mi. 2022 ft. GPSies

mongauphardenburgh_map Take the Beaverkill Rd. toward the Lew Beach and Turnwood area. Keep driving even when the road turns to gravel and dirty. After about 30 minutes you will see the Zen Monastery on the left. After this is the parking area for Cradle Rock Ridge on the right. Continue on until you see the small parking area for the Mongaup Hardenburgh Trail on the Right. Park your car and sign in at the register. The hike through to Mongaup Pond is about 6.5 miles. You, of course, can turn around at any point and return to your car. You can park another car at the end of the trail at the Mongaup Campgrounds. Just after the trail register you cross the Beaverkill on a rather unique steel cable suspension bridge. The bridge has wooden decking which is showing its age but still seems safe. You now begin a long and sometimes challenging ascent of the Beaverkill ridge. The highest point on the ridge is almost 3200 feet! The trail offers very few views of t e valleys surrounding the ridge. After about two miles the trail opens up into a small clearing. Walk to the left of the trail to a rock ledge. The views to the east are the only ones you will find on this hike! As you continue you will descend the Beaverkill Ridge and then ascend east Mongaup Mountain. At the three mile mark just before this ascent a red marked trail to Long Pond branches to the left. There are no signs to mark this trail but the markers are clear. After ascending east Mongaup you descend quite a bit before ascending Middle Mongaup Mountain. At this point you may decide to go off trail for less than half a mile to ascend the main summit of Mongaup Mountain. The trail continues down now to the state campgrounds. At the T-junction at Mongaup Pond turn right and stay on the blue trail until you reach the loop road. Turning right is the shortest way to the park entrance. After less than a mile, you will see the main buildings.

(The map shows the parking area and the through hiking route south and west.)

mongauphardenburgh_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Mongaup Pondnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagit 3.0 mi. 235 ft. GPSies

mongaup_map This hike can be easy or difficult depending on the conditions. In two feet of fresh snow the going is tough. Under most other conditions it is an easy walk. Park at the “beach” Parking area at Mongaup Pond or outside the gatehouse when the park is closed. Walk the park roads in clockwise direction around the entire pond or walk as far as you can go and turn around.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)mongaup_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Mongaup Pond Ledges: Down to the Pondnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.0 mi. 1422 ft. GPSies

mongaupledges_map From Livingston Manor take DeBruce Road toward Round Pond. At about 6 miles turn left on Mongaup Road. Where the road splits bear to the left and park at the parking area for Frick Pond. Walk across the road to the beginning of the blue blazed Flynn Trail. Walk through a short section of trail in the woods before the trial breaks out onto a wide woods road. At about 1 mile look for a pile of logs on the right. Walk around the logs and head through the woods to an interesting open area. The area seems to be a bog on top of bedrock! The mosses here are typical of bogs but it doesn’t seem possible that they would develop here. Explore this area an notice to the southeast a road that leads back down to the pile of logs. From this point on the hike is a bushwhack until you arrive at Mongaup Pond so directions and mileages will vary. Head to the east of the cleared area and through the woods. After a short walk, you will begin to encounter some impressive ledges. There are several way to get down through the ledges just continue to head east. Take your time to explore this area as it in very interesting. The drop in elevation is around 500 feet in half a mile. Eventually you will be on the road that runs around Mongaup Pond. Turn left and walk about .4 miles on the road. Watch for signs for a snowmobile trail as the road turns to the right. Get on the snowmobile trail and continue to follow it as it will lead back to the Flynn Trail. The first part of this trail runs along the edge of a swamp and is usually wet. Of course, you will have to regain the elevation you lost coming down the ledges! The trail begins to climb at around 3.2 miles. Over the next 1.8 miles the trail rises around 700 feet to an elevation of 2880 feet before descending back to the Flynn Trail. At about 5.3 miles you will be at the intersection of the snowmobile trail, the Flynn Trail and the Big Rock Trail. Turn left on the Flynn Trail which now descends 600 feet over the next 1.7 miles to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

mongaupledges_pro

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Mongaup Pond Ledges: Up from the Pondnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.4 mi. 1280 ft. GPSies

Mongaup Ledges (Up)_map From Livingston Manor take DeBruce Road toward Round Pond. At about 6 miles turn left on Mongaup Road. Where the road splits bear to the left and park at the parking area for Frick Pond. Walk across the road to the beginning of the blue blazed Flynn Trail. Walk 1.7 miles to the junction of the Flynn Trail, the Big Rock Trail and a snowmobile trail. Along the way watch for a pile of logs and a slight clearing off the trail on your right. This will be your return point on the way back. Turn right on the snowmobile trail and climb for another .25 miles to the top of the hill. From here the trail descends for about 2 miles to the loop road at Mongaup Pond State Campsites. The actual distance from the top of the hill to the pond is only .8 miles but the trail meanders considerably. As it nears the pond there is a swampy area to the right and water running off the hill can make the trail very wet. At the loop road turn right and walk along the road for about .5 miles before turning into the woods to head west on a bushwhack back to the Flynn Trail. There is a woods road here to follow for a while but it tends to angle north and you want to head west to the ledges. As you approach the ledges there will be obvious places to climb up through them. When you are near the top, head west to a large clearing just off the Flynn Trail near that pile of logs from earlier in the hike. The area seems to be a bog on top of bedrock! The mosses here are typical of bogs but it doesn’t seem possible that they would develop here. Explore this area an notice to the southeast a road that leads back down to the pile of logs. You may follow the road or head directly west to the Flynn Trail. Turn left on the Flynn Trail and walk about 1.2 miles back to your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the clockwise lollipop hiking route.)

Mongaup Ledges (Up)_pro

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Mongaup Pond: Mongaup Falls Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 8.2 mi. 1290 ft. GPSies

mongaupfalls_map From Livingston Manor take DeBruce Road toward Round Pond. At about 6 miles turn left on Mongaup Road. Where the road splits bear to the right and park in the small pulloff just past the intersection. Walk down the woods road to the stream and cross on the “bridge”. Continue straight ahead on the woods road for about .4 miles and then turn left on the snowmobile trail. The trail rolls some but is mostly flat. It runs near the stream at points and can be very wet as water runs down from the ledges on the right. At about 2 miles a trail will lead out to one of the campsite loops at Mongaup State Campgrounds where you may want to take a rest. Back on the main snowmobile trail walk about .7 miles and watch for the yellow Mongaup Willowemoc hiking trail on the right. Turn here and start the first real climb of the hike ascending 260 feet over the next .7 miles as you climb the ridge that surrounds the pond. From the top of the ridge you will then descend the other side of the ridge. In another .6 miles, about 4.2 miles into the hike, turn right on the snowmobile trail to head southwest. This trail climbs about 400 feet over the next 1.2 miles to the shoulder of a hill on the east side of the pond. From that point the trail mostly descends with a few slight climbs over the next 1.7 miles where it meets the woods road you were on at the beginning of the hike. Turn right to head northwest fro about a mile until you are back at the main road. Just before crossing the “bridge”, walk downstream until you get to a nice falls. There are several different viewpoints for this two-tiered cascade and it is well worth the short trip.

(The map shows the parking area and the clockwise lollipop hiking route.)

mongaupfalls_pro

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Mongaup Wetlandsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 8.2 mi. 1111 ft. GPSies

mongaupwet_map This hike takes in some of the wetlands east of Mongaup Pond. Some of these are being studied by Dr. Mike Kudish as a part of his ongoing project to understand the development of the Catskill forests. The first part of the hike is on snowmobile trail from Mongaup State Park and then on blazed hiking trails. Eventually you must strike out into the woods to get to the two wetlands areas. Your path during the bushwhack may vary significantly from this one. The easiest way to do this particular hike is to ask the attendant at the gatehouse if you can park at campsite 34 on the east side of the campgrounds. From here find the snowmobile trail that leaves the campsite and walk east and then north. At about .8 miles watch for the yellow Mongaup Willowemoc Trail on the right. Turn on this trail and walk for about 1.3 miles to where a bridge crosses a small creek. There Rae several of these so watch your mileage. If you arrive at Butternut Junction, you have gone too far. Walk about .7 miles southwest and you should be in the area of a small marsh. Walk to the marsh. Walk around the marsh. Inspect the marsh. When done, return to the main trail. Turn left on the main trail and then almost immediately strike off the trail in a northeast direction. A walk of about .25 miles will put you on the “shores” of Butternut Creek which acts as the outlet to Sand Pond. Cross the wetlands and walk downstream along the creek for about .5 miles where you should find the Mongaup Willowemoc Trail again. Turn right and follow your route back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

mongaupwet_pro

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Mount Tobiasnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 2.3 mi. 700 ft. GPSies

mounttobias_map From the junction of Route 28A and 28 just south of Boiceville drive north 1.1 miles and turn right on Winnie Rd. Drive to the end of road and turn right on the Mount Tremper-Wittenberg Road. Drive .2 miles and turn left on Abbey Road which ascends Mount Tobias. Drive about 2.5 miles and watch for a rutted and eroded access road on your left. There is no sign on the road but there is a parking area big enough for a few cars if you can negotiate the “driveway”. Park and start your hike on the woods road that leaves the parking area to the north. After only about .25 miles you will notice that the road continues to the north but that Mount Tobias is to the ENE. Turn in that direction and walk a short distance to find some interesting cliffs. Walk to the right at the base of the cliffs until you can find a good place to start up the steep hill. The steep Apr continues for about .5 miles until you reach a flatter part near the summit. The highest point is marked by a cairn and is about a .2 mile walk along relatively flat ground. Clear views are difficult to come by but there are views through the trees at several points on the summit. Return the way you came.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

mounttobias_pro

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Mud Pond (Complete Loop)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.0 mi. 1130 ft. GPSies

mudonly_map This is one of our favorite trails when we just want to hike. It has several variations for distance and difficulty. Like most trails, hiking one way is different than hiking in the other direction. We have take this route more than a dozen times this season and it is interesting to watch the changing seasons. It is unfortunate that Russell Brook Road is closed due to the frequent floods that have washed out the road.

Turn left on Morton Hill Road on Route 206 just after the Rockland Flats. Bear right up Morton Hill Road until you see a parking area on the left near the sign indicates Russell Brook Road is closed. Park here on the side of the road and hike down Russell Brook Road .5 miles to the actual trail head. Walk down Russell Brook Road .6 miles to lower trailhead parking area. Along the way take a peek at Russell Brook Falls on your right. Continue straight ahead on the road which has been devastated by several floods and is closed just passed the main parking area. When you reach the large boulders that act as a roadblock continue hikingto the first of several deep cuts across the road caused by the erosion of water running off the ridge on the left. Walk through the first and then another larger cut. At about 1.5 miles the road had been completely eroded by the stream. Climb the bank, walk around the eroded area and then slide back down to the road. Continue to hike along the road which is very overgrown with weeds and brush and has a few major blowdowns. At 2.0 miles cross the stream on the stepping stones when the water level is so low. When the water is higher you may have to 1look upstream or downstream for a better crossing or take your shoes off and wade across. In another .2 miles cross under the power lines and turn right on the trail. The trail begins with a short but somewhat steep ascent but then levels off some as it passes by a beaver pond. The trail is not used too much and may need maintenance including additional trail markers which can be very scarce in some areas. Pass by a beaver pond on the left as the trail remains level for some time following the base of a ridge. At about 2.9 miles the trail begins to climb and ascends for .5 miles and gains 375 feet. The trail is parallel to the stream that flows out of Mud Pond. As you near the top of the hill you can see Mud Pond through the trees. Find a path to the pond or just head off through the woods to the clearing near the outlet. This is a nice place to stop for a drink and a snack. Get back on the trail and at 4.0 miles follow the hiking trail as it turns right. A snowmobile trail goes off to the left here. Continue on the trail which follows an old woods road. Watch for some stone foundations on the right from farms that were on this area in the early 20th century. Pass the left turn to the trail around Trout Pond at 4.4 miles. Walk up the short hill and then start down the other side. By the time you reach the trail register box you will have lost the 375 feet of elevation you gained walking up the hill to Mud Pond. Just passed the register box is an impressive area of Japanese knotweed which gets larger every year. Russell Brook Falls is to your left along a short path. The falls are well worth the trip especially if the water is high. It is a short walk out to the parking area and the final part of the hike is to walk back up Russell Brook Road to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

mudonly_pro

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Neversink Unique Area: High Fallsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 7.8 mi. 1608 ft. GPSies

neversinkuniquehighfalls_map Take the Rock Hill exit off State Route 17 and turn right. Drive south on Katrina Falls Road. Park in the small parking area at the end of the road. Walk through the gate and onto the woods road which is the blue trail that parallels the Neversink River. A spur trail to the river goes right at .6 miles and another trail goes to the left at .7 miles. Stay on the blue trail for about 1.4 miles until another yellow spur trail heads right down to the river. This trail is .3 miles but steep in places and leads down to Denton Falls. After taking in the view at the falls, get back on the main trail. From this point on the trail is more of a trail as the woods road heads left but you will stay right following the blue blazes. At 2.7 miles the trail climbs to the highest point on the hike and then descends to 4.0 miles where a short yellow spur trail leads down to High Falls. When you have completed your exploration of the falls retrace your route back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hike.)
neversinkuniquehighfalls_pro
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Neversink Unique Area: Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 10.2 mi. 1945 ft. GPSies

neversinkuniqueloop_map Take the Rock Hill exit off State Route 17. Drive south on Katrina Falls road. Park in the small parking area at the end of the road. Walk through the gate and onto the woods road which is the blue trail that parallels the Neversink River. A spur trail to the river goes right at .6 miles and another trail goes to the left at .7 miles. Stay on the blue trail for about 1.4 miles until another yellow spur trail heads right down to the river. This trail is .3 miles but steep in places and leads down to Denton Falls. After taking in the view at the falls, get back on the main trail. From this point on the trail is more of a trail as the woods road heads left but you will stay right following the blue blazes. At 2.7 miles the trail climbs to the highest point on the hike and then descends to 4.0 miles where a short yellow spur trail leads down to High Falls. When you have completed your exploration of the falls retrace your route back to the trail junction near Denton Falls. Turn right on the red trail to begin a loop. After only a few hundred feet take the yellow spur trail to the left that goes down to Mullet Brook Falls. The trail is less than .2 miles but the falls, when there has been some rain, is very pretty. Walk back to the red trail and turn left to continue the loop. The trail gains some elevation until at 7 miles it intersects a woods road. Be sure to turn left here or you will be headed south into uncharted territory. In about .3 miles the red trail turns left. Continue straight ahead on the woods road to a parking area at about 8 miles. Walk down the dirt road until the road turns right towards Wolf Lake. Walk straight ahead on the power line right-of-way and cross a little stream to get to Wolf Lake Road. Turn left on the road and walk to Katrina Falls Road. Turn left on Katrina Falls Road to get back to the parking area. The whole road walk is about a mile.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back loop hike.)
neversinkuniqueloop_pro
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Neversink Unique Area: Middlenew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 10.3 mi. 1885 ft. GPSies

neversinkmiddle_map Take the Rock Hill exit off State Route 17. Drive south on Katrina Falls road. Park in the small parking area at the end of the road. Walk through the gate and onto the woods road which is the blue trail that parallels the Neversink River. A spur trail to the river goes right at .6 miles and another trail goes to the left at .7 miles. Stay on the blue trail for about 3.4 miles until a yellow spur trail heads right down to High Falls. When you have completed your exploration of the falls return to the main trail. The blue blazed trail ends here and any further exploration to the south will be a bushwhack. In some places there seem to be roads or trails but this can be confusing since many lead nowhere. Careful exploration will allow you to find a woods road that leads to the “southern” part of the Neversink Unique Area. Once you find the woods road, the hike is about 1.75 miles to an old hunting camp. There are several woods roads that cross the one you are hiking but stay generally straight. of course, if you stray, you can simply turn around and hike back the way you came. There is a dirt road at the hunting shack and this is as good a place as any to stop. If you have more time or want to do a car spot, you could do part or all of the southern loop. When done, return the same way you came.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hike.)
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Neversink Unique Area: Mullet Falls Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagit 4.1 mi. 850 ft. GPSies

 

link to topo map

Take the Rock Hill exit off State Route 17. Drive south on Katrina Falls road. Park in the small parking area at the end of the road. Walk through the gate and onto the woods road which is the blue trail that parallels the Neversink River. A spur trail to the river goes right at about .5 miles. After crossing Wolf Brook on a small wooden bridge the trail splits. Stay left and walk through some evergreens mixed with hardwoods. Over the next .75 miles the trail ascends to the top of a ridge and then levels out at 1.4 miles. The trail rolls a little and makes a sweeping right turn to the south at 1.5 miles. At 1.7 miles you will cross Mullet Falls Brook well above the falls on a wooden bridge. At 1.75 miles be sure to follow the main trail as it turns right and heads west. The trail descends now and at 2.3 miles a spur trail heads off to the right. Turn right on this trail and walk less than a quarter mile to the falls. When you are in front of the falls, you are facing east so the best time to be there to take pictures is in the early morning before the sun rises over the ridge or in the afternoon when the sun is behind you. The water falls about 20 feet in a nice pool below. When you are ready turn around and walk back to the main trail. Turn right and stay on the main trail as it turns right at 2.75 miles. At 3.5 miles you will be back at the intersection where you bore to the left to start the loop. Walk the final .6 miles uphill back to the car.

(The map at the right shows the parking area and the clockwise loop hike.)
link to topo profile
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Neversink Unique Area: Northnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 5.6 mi. 1240 ft. GPSies

neversinknorth_map Take the Rock Hill exit off State Route 17. Drive south on Katrina Falls road. Park in the small parking area at the end of the road. Walk through the gate and onto the woods road which is the blue trail that parallels the Neversink River. A spur trail to the river goes right at .6 miles and another trail goes to the left at .7 miles. Stay on the blue trail for about 1.2 miles until another yellow spur trail heads right down to the river. This trail is .25 miles and leads down to a nice rapids on the river. Go back to the main trail and walk about .2 miles to another yellow spur trail on the right. This trail is .3 miles long but steep in places and leads down to Denton Falls. After taking in the view at the falls, get back on the main trail and walk to a trail junction where the blue trail bears right. Bear left on the red trail to begin a loop. After only a few hundred feet take the yellow spur trail to the left that goes down to Mullet Brook Falls. The trail is less than .2 miles but the falls, when there has been some rain, is very pretty. Walk back to the red trail and turn left to continue the loop. The trail gains some elevation until at 3.4 miles it intersects a woods road. Be sure to turn left here or you will be headed south into uncharted territory. In about .3 miles the red trail turns left again and follows a woods road. Hike for another mile and you will be back at the junction with the blue trail where you should turn right. In just over .1 miles another yellow spur trail turns left and goes .25 miles down to the river. Follow this trail and then return the same way. Reverse your route to get back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the route with a anticlockwise loop.)
neversinknorth_pro
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Neversink Unique Area: Southnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 6.6 mi. 985 ft. GPSies

neversinksouth_map Take the Wurtsboro exit off State Route 17. Drive south on Route 209 to Westerbrookville. Turn right on Pine Kill Road until David Rhodes Road appears on the left. Turn left over the small bridge and up a hill. Turn left on Skinner Road which starts as a paved road and slowly deteriorates to a DIRT TRACK. Make sure you have a high clearance vehicle and four wheel drive in all but the driest conditions. Park in the small parking area at the end of the road being careful to avoid a large rock that can hide in the tall grass. There are NO TRAILS in this area although there is a register box. Your hike will be along woods roads for the entire length but most are unmarked and it is possible to make “wrong” turns. Just out of the parking area woods road bears to the right and heads northwest for about 2.7 miles along a ridge. At this point the road seems to split. One branch continues staring ahead toward the northern part of the Neversink Unique Area. Turn left as that branch of the road descend almost 500 feet in the next .85 miles to a hunting shack. At the hunting shack turn left on another road. Walk along this road for .7 miles at which point another road heads to the left and UP the ridge. In .6 miles the steep climb gains nearly 500 feet back to the ridge. Continue along the road for about .4 miles and at 5.25 miles you should be back at the woods road to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the lollipop route with a anticlockwise loop.)
neversinksouth_pro
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Neversink Unique Area: Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 8.8 mi. 1986 ft. GPSies

neversinkuniquethreefalls_map Take the Rock Hill exit off State Route 17. Drive south on Katrina Falls road. Park in the small parking area at the end of the road. Walk through the gate and onto the woods road which is the blue trail that parallels the Neversink River. A spur trail to the river goes right at .6 miles and another trail goes to the left at .7 miles. Stay on the blue trail for about 1.4 miles until another yellow spur trail heads right down to the river. This trail is .3 miles but is steep in places and leads down to Denton Falls. After taking in the view at the falls, get back on the main trail. From this point on the trail is more of a trail as the woods road heads left but you will stay right following the blue blazes. At 2.7 miles the trail climbs to the highest point on the hike and then descends to 4.0 miles where a short yellow spur trail leads down to High Falls. When you have completed your exploration of the falls retrace your route back to the trail junction near Denton Falls. Turn right on the red trail to begin a loop. After only a few hundred feet take the yellow spur trail to the left that goes down to Mullet Brook Falls. The trail is less than .2 miles but the falls, when there has been some rain, is very pretty. Walk back to the red trail and turn left to continue the loop. The trail gains some elevation until at 7 miles it intersects a woods road. Be sure to turn left here or you will be headed south into uncharted territory. In about .3 miles the red trail turns left. Another trail continues straight ahead to a parking area near Wolf Lake. Continue on the red trail as it heads downhill and eventually meets the blue trail at 8.2 miles. Turn right here to head back up the hill to the parking area after crossing Wolf Brook.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back loop hike.)
neversinkuniquethreefalls_pro
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North Lake South Lake: Escarpment, Mary’s Glen, Rock Shelter Trailsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 9.4 mi. 2030 ft. GPSies

nslake_map The hiking trails around the North Lake South Lake Campgrounds may be the most scenic in the Catskills. As you hike the Escarpment Trail the history and the views just seem to get better with every passing mile. Many spots have names like Inspiration Point and Artist’s Rock. Even places that aren’t named have beautiful views of the Hudson River and surrounding countryside. Turn north on Rt 18 from Rt 23A in the town of Haines Falls. After about 1 mile, turn right on Schutt Road just before the entrance to the state campgrounds. Turn left into the parking area. Walk across Schutt Road to the beginning of the blue marked Escarpment Trail. Several different trails intersect the Escarpment Trail at different places. Some of these trails are horse trails of snowmobile trails and not all are well marked. After 1.2 miles of descent, the trail turns sharply left and ascends. At this bend is the Layman Monument erected to a fire fighter who perished fighting a forest fire in 1900. There is a limited view from this spot that hints at what is to come. In just over half a mile the trail passes by Sunset Rock (South) and just beyond that Inspiration Point. This part of the trail is a constant ascent but not a steep one. These two lookouts have some nice views of Kaaterskill Clove and the mountains on the other side. A careful look to the east along the Clove reveals a glint of water; the Hudson River. The trail continues its ascent and in less than a mile turns sharply left to ascend South Mountain. Near the top of South Mountain is the site of the Kaaterskill House, one of the many hotels and rooming houses that were so prevalent throughout the Catskills. At this point the Escarpment Trail turns sharply right. To see the Site of the Kaaterskill House, turn left on the red marked Schutt Road trail. Retrace your steps and get back on the Escarpment Trail. The trail has several ups and downs and at one point makes a sharp right and heads toward Split Rock and Boulder Rock. Be sure to stay on the blue trail. A red trail continues straight ahead and cuts out both of these sites. These two rocks are DEFINITELY worth the extra time. At Split Rock the trail passes by several places where large pieces of rock have split of the main formation. Boulder Rock is a large boulder just sitting on a rocky shelf. This site gives the first and one of the best views of the Hudson River. Continuing downhill the trail now leads to the site of the Catskill Mountain House. Where a large boarding house once stood overlooking the Hudson, there is now an open field and a sign commemorating the structure. The views are fantastic and many people like to picnic here or just sit and enjoy the views. For those who want to hike less, parking is available at North Lake Beach and the walk is less than half a mile up a very gradual incline. The trail continues down to the lake and through several picnic areas skirting the eastern end of the campgrounds. At this point it starts and ascent that will total 450 feet. Most areas are gentle but several are short but steep. Artist’s Rock is about .75 miles from the Catskill Mountain House site and offers excellent, unobstructed views of the Hudson and the small towns below. In a little more than a half mile, a yellow marked trail hooks back around to Sunset Rock (North) and Lookout Rock. The views of the two lakes from here are beautiful! This area also offers an opportunity to climb to the area without using the trail. Several chimneys and cracks provide short but challenging climbs. Back on the trail another .2 miles leads to Newman’s Ledge with more great views of the Hudson River Valley. The trail has been ascend sing sharply for some time since Artist’s Rock and continues to do so. Hike .6 more miles and Find Badman Cave at the junction with the Rock Shelter Trail. The “cave” is more like Badman Overhanging Rock Shelter. The Escarpment Trail Ascends sharply here and the levels off some. In .7 miles there is a junction with the Mary’s Glen Trail. Turn left staying on the Escarpment trail toward North Point. The hike to the Point is only .3 miles but some of it is very steep with some rock scrambles. Once on North Point you will know that your work was worth it. From this high point you can see spectacular views of the Hudson River and the surrounding communities. Return to the junction with the Mary’s Glen Trail and turn right. This trail descends for .8 miles. At the junction with the Rock Shelter trail turn right on the yellow marked Rock Shelter Trail. The 1.3 mile walk back to the car is punctuated by rocks and roots without many views. (The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

nslake_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


North South Lake: Escarpment Loop Anticlockwise (No North Point)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 12.5 mi. 2575 ft. GPSies

North South Lake (no NP)_map The hiking trails around the North Lake South Lake Campgrounds may be the most scenic in the Catskills. As you hike the Escarpment Trail the history and the views just seem to get better with every passing mile. Many spots have names like Inspiration Point and Artist’s Rock. Even places that aren’t named have beautiful views of the Hudson River and surrounding countryside. Turn north on Rt 18 from Rt 23A in the town of Haines Falls. After about 1 mile, turn right on Schutt Road just before the entrance to the state campgrounds. Turn left into the parking area. Walk across Schutt Road to the beginning of the blue marked Escarpment Trail. Several different trails intersect the Escarpment Trail at different places. Some of these trails are horse trails of snowmobile trails and not all are well marked. After 1.2 miles of descent, the trail turns sharply left and ascends. At this bend is the Layman Monument erected to a fire fighter who perished fighting a forest fire in 1900. There is a limited view from this spot that hints at what is to come. In just over half a mile the trail passes by Sunset Rock (South) and just beyond that Inspiration Point. This part of the trail is a constant ascent but not a steep one. These two lookouts have some nice views of Kaaterskill Clove and the mountains on the other side. A careful look to the east along the Clove reveals a glint of water; the Hudson River. The trail continues its ascent and in less than a mile turns sharply left to ascend South Mountain. Straight ahead at this point, a horse trail descends toward the Palenville Lookout. This is a steep trail but the lookout is worth the effort. The horse trail follows the ledges for some time until at about 3.9 miles it turns sharply left to descend to the level below. After a steep but short descent be sure to turn right and walk out to the lookout at about 4.5 miles. There are several viewpoints here with some giving a better view back up Kaaterskill Clove and others a view down to Palenville and out over the Hudson River. After you have rested and taken pictures retrace your steps all the way back to the Escarpment Trail. Make a right to walk up toward South Mountain. Near the top of South Mountain is the site of the Kaaterskill House, one of the many hotels and rooming houses that were so prevalent throughout the Catskills. At this point the Escarpment Trail turns sharply right. The trail has several ups and downs and at one point makes a sharp right and heads toward Split Rock and Boulder Rock. Be sure to stay on the blue trail. A red trail continues straight ahead and cuts out both of these sites. These two rocks are DEFINITELY worth the extra time. At Split Rock the trail passes by several places where large pieces of rock have split of the main formation. Boulder Rock is a large boulder just sitting on a rocky shelf. This site gives the first and one of the best views of the Hudson River. Continuing downhill the trail now leads to the site of the Catskill Mountain House. Where a large boarding house once stood overlooking the Hudson, there is now an open field and a sign commemorating the structure. The views are fantastic and many people like to picnic here or just sit and enjoy the views. For those who want to hike less, parking is available at North Lake Beach and the walk is less than half a mile up a very gradual incline. The trail continues down to the lake and through several picnic areas skirting the eastern end of the campgrounds. At this point it starts and ascent that will total 450 feet. Most areas are gentle but several are short but steep. Artist’s Rock is about .75 miles from the Catskill Mountain House site and offers excellent, unobstructed views of the Hudson and the small towns below. In a little more than a half mile, at 9.4 miles into the hike, a yellow marked trail hooks back around to Sunset Rock (North) and Lookout Rock. The views of the two lakes from here are beautiful! This area also offers an opportunity to climb to the area without using the trail. Several chimneys and cracks provide short but challenging climbs. Back on the trail another .2 miles leads to Newman’s Ledge with more great views of the Hudson River Valley. The trail has been ascending sharply for some time since Artist’s Rock and continues to do so. Hike .6 more miles and find Badman Cave at the junction with the Rock Shelter Trail. The “cave” is more like Badman Overhanging Rock Shelter. The Escarpment Trail ascends sharply here and the yellow Rock Shelter Trail branches to the left. Turn left on the Rock Shelter Trail. At about 11.0 miles make a sharp right and then a quick left to stay on the Rock Shelter Trail. Along this trail you may find several small waterfalls in wetter weather. In the winter the ledges are often covered in ice. After the turns, there is about a 1.4 mile walk back to the car which is punctuated by rocks and roots without many views.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

North South Lake (no NP)_pro

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North Lake South Lake: Escarpment Clockwise Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.7 mi. 1603 ft. GPSies

nslakeclock_map The hiking trails around the North Lake South Lake Campgrounds may be the most scenic in the Catskills. As you hike the Escarpment Trail the history and the views just seem to get better with every passing mile. Many spots have names like Inspiration Point and Artist’s Rock. Even places that aren’t named have beautiful views of the Hudson River and surrounding countryside. Turn north on Rt 18 from Rt 23A in the town of Haines Falls. After about 1 mile, turn right on Schutt Road just before the entrance to the state campgrounds. Turn left into the parking area. Walk up Schutt Road and across Route 18 to pick up the yellow Rock Shelter Trail. Walk through the woods and over roots and rocks for 1.3 miles. Turn left on the red Mary’s Glen Trail and climb just less than 2 miles to the blue Escarpment Trail. Turn left and continue to climb to North Point. It is only .25 miles but requires some rock scrambling in places to get up to several fantastic lookouts over the lakes and across to the Hudson River. When you have taken in the view, climb back down the Escarpment Trail but continue straight ahead at the trail junction. At 3.25 miles Badman Cave will be just off the trail on your right. A little further on at 3.4 miles you will be at Newman’s Ledge. Just passed this point a short yellow spur trail leads up to Lookout Rock and Sunset Rock. These viewpoint offer great views over the Hudson and the two lakes, respectively. Back on the main trail at 4.3 miles you will pass by Artist Rock and then begin to descend to a parking area for the beach at the east end of North Lake. A slight climb places you in an open field with expansive views of the Hudson River. This was once the site of the Catskill Mountain House. After admiring the view and indulging in some thoughts about the past, get back on the Escarpment Trail and head for Boulder Rock and Split Rock at around 5.4 miles. Continue on the Escarpment Trail until the junction at 6.3 miles. Here the Escarpment trail turns left at you should go straight ahead on the red Schutt Road Trail. This trail ends after less than a mile at the Escarpment Trail.unr right and walk to Schutt Road. Cross the road to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

nslakeclock_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


North South Lake: Kaaterskill and Bastion Falls Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 3.5 mi. 1125 ft. GPSies

kaaterskillfallsloop_map Bastion and Kaaterskill Falls are a popular destination for sightseers in the Catskills. Kaaterskill Falls may be the highest falls in New York State. Even when the volume of water is low both falls are pretty. The parking area for the falls is on Route 23A just east of Haines Falls and west of Palenville. The parking area is small compared to the amount of people who want to use it especially on the weekends. From the parking area walk down the road toward the east. BE CAREFUL as you walk down the road because many of the drivers are not! In a short distance a stone bridge crosses Spruce Creek.Turn left an step over or under the guard rail. The falls next to the road are Bastion Falls. Depending on the water level you may be able to walk down to the creek bed and look upstream. The trail continues up the creek for about .5 miles to the base of Kaaterskill Falls. The lower and upper falls comprise a drop of about 260 feet. The formal trail ends at this point but many informal paths continue to the top of the falls. The first climb intersects a horizontal trail that leads to the amphitheater between the two falls. Turn left on this path but be careful as you approach the area between the falls. This area is often VERY wet and the rocks can be VERY slippery. The climb to the top of the falls is STEEP and eroded and very difficult at times. At the top of the falls there are great views down to the pool at the bottom of the falls and down the clove formed by Spruce Creek. At any point you can reverse your path back to the car. At the top of the falls you may also be able to cross over to the other side which offers different views. Many times the water is too high to cross. Continue on up along Spruce Creek for about .75 miles to the main road into North South Lake Campgrounds. As you walk you will find some of the trails at the campgrounds. Walk along the road the road for about .5 miles and turn left on Laurel House Road. Walk .6 miles down Laurel House Road to the parking area at the dead end. Walk along any of the paths to the top of the falls. At one time the Laurel House stood near the end of the road overlooking the falls. Follow one of the informal paths along the “right” rim of the falls and begin a STEEP and sometimes difficult descent down the west side of the creek. If you stay near the creek, you will be able to find a path to the area between the falls. Keep descending and find an area to cross the creek. This is never particularly safe but will not be possible when the water is high! After crossing the creek, use the trail to return to Route 23A and to your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly clockwise direction.)

kaaterskillfallsloop_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


North South Lake: Kaaterskill and Bastion Falls Out and Backnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 1.5 mi. 370 ft. GPSies

kaaterskillfalls_map Bastion and Kaaterskill Falls are a popular destination for sightseers in the Catskills. Kaaterskill Falls may be the highest falls in New York State. Even when the volume of water is low both falls are pretty. The parking area for the falls is on Route 23A just east of Haines Falls and west of Palenville. The parking area is small compared to the amount of people who want to use it especially on the weekends. From the parking area walk down the road toward the east. BE CAREFUL as you walk down the road because many of the drivers are not! In a short distance a stone bridge crosses Spruce Creek. Turn left and step over the guard rail. The falls next to the road are Bastion Falls. Depending on the water level you may be able to walk down to the creek bed and look upstream. The trail continues up the creek for about .5 miles to the base of Kaaterskill Falls. The lower and upper falls comprise a drop of about 260 feet. The formal trail ends at this point but many informal paths continue to the top of the falls. The informal paths are TOO DANGEROUS to climb and many people have been injured and several have lost their lives. DO NOT climb beyond the fencing that is now in place! When you are done enjoying the falls, turn around and retrace your steps to the car. If you would like a view from the top of the falls, drive west on Route 23 and turn right onto the road to the North South Lake Campgrounds. Watch for Laurel House Road on the right just before the entrance to the campgrounds. Drive to the end of the road and park in the lot. The trail to the top of the falls leads out of the back of the parking area. The trail to the right is a rail trail and the map is on the signboard in the kiosk.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

kaaterskillfalls_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


North Lake South Lake: North Point, Stoppel Point, Escarpment Trail, Palenville Lookoutnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 14.4 mi. 3000 ft. GPSies

northsouthlakeall_map The hiking trails around the North Lake South Lake Campgrounds may be the most scenic in the Catskills. As you hike the Escarpment Trail the history and the views just seem to get better with every passing mile. Many spots have names like Inspiration Point and Artist’s Rock. Even places that aren’t named have beautiful views of the Hudson River and surrounding countryside. Turn north on Rt 18 from Rt 23A in the town of Haines Falls. After about 1 mile, turn right on Schutt Road just before the entrance to the state campgrounds. Turn left into the parking area. Walk up Schutt Road and cross the main road to the campgrounds to the start of the yellow Rock Shelter trail. This may be one of my least favorite trails since it winds its way over rocks and roots for about 1.3 miles to the red Mary Glen Trail. There isn’t much to see along the trail. Turn left on the Mary’s Glen trail toward North Point. This trail ascends for about .8 miles to join the blue Escarpment Trail near North Point. The hike to the Point is only .3 miles but some of it is very steep with some rock scrambles. Once on North Point you will know that your work was worth it. From this high point you can see spectacular views of the Hudson River and the surrounding communities. North Point has at least three different “levels” and the best view may be from the highest one. Stay on the Escarpment Trail as it levels off slightly and passes by North Mountain. The trail rolls some before climbing to Stoppel Point after about 1.8 miles. Stopple Point offers great views to the northeast and on a clear day buildings in Albany are visible. Continue on for less than a mile to a plane crash on the right side of the trail and watch for another lookout to the south on the right side of the trail as you return. From Stopple Point reverse your path and return 1.8 miles to North Point and the .3 miles back to the junction with Mary’s Glen Trail. This time stay on the Escarpment Trail and in about .7 miles descend a rock slope to the trail junction with the Rock Shelter trail. On your right will be Badman cave which is more of a rock overhang than a cave. Stay on the Escarpment trail by bearing to the left and pass by a small swampy area on the right of the trail. In about .5 miles you will be at Newman’s Ledge which offers now limited views. From Newman’s Ledge the trail descends steeply for a bit. Watch for a yellow spur trail to the right which leads to Lookout Point and Sunset Rock North. The views of the two lakes from Sunset Rock are beautiful! Lookout Point offers more views of the Hudson to the east. This area also offers an opportunity to climb to the area without using the trail. Several chimneys and cracks provide short but challenging climbs. Return to the main trail and pass under several rock overhangs along the base of the lookouts you just visited. In .5 miles you will be at Artist Rock. This viewpoint offers spectacular views of the Hudson Valley and is often used by photographers and artists. The trail continues to descend to the beach and parking area at the extreme east end of North Lake. Go through the parking lot and head toward the iron gate to stay on the Escarpment Trail and ascend the .25 miles to the site of the former Catskill Mountain House where a large boarding house once stood overlooking the Hudson. There is now an open field and a sign commemorating the structure. The views are fantastic and many people like to picnic here or just sit and enjoy the views. It is easy to see why this was such a popular Catskill destination with a cog railway and road for carriages. In about .5 miles the Escarpment trail bears left to go toward Boulder Rock and Split Rock. DO NOT take the red cutoff trail or you will miss these two sights. Boulder Rock is a large boulder just sitting on a rocky shelf. This site gives one of the best views of the Hudson River. At Split Rock the trail passes by several places where large pieces of rock have split of the main bedrock formation. Continue on for about .7 miles to the junction with the Schutt road trail near the site of the former Kaaterskill Hotel. This was another popular hotel and boarding house that once stood in the area. Turn sharply left to descend on the Escarpment Trail for about .4 miles. Here the Escarpment Trail meets the Harding Road Trail and a horse trail. Turn left on the Harding Road and horse trail to start the hike to the Palenville Lookout. When the Harding Road Trail turns right DO NOT follow it but stay on the horse trail. There will be few marking on the horse trail so follow it carefully. When the trail splits follow the fork to the right. The trail is flat is places and then descends. It starts out heading northeast but then bends southeast before turning northeast again! After .8 miles, there is a switchback that sends you southwest and descends VERY STEEPLY. At the base of this switchback the trail splits. Make a SHARP RIGHT here to head toward the Palenville Lookout! In another .5 miles you will descend again to the Lookout. The views from here are phenomenal. To the right you can see Kaaterskill High Peak and Round top and up into Kaaterskill Clove. Straight out from the lookout is the Hudson while looking left gives you a view more toward the north. Laid out below, so close you could almost reach out and touch it, is the small town of Palenville. Hikers have used some of the local flagstones to build several chairs on the lookout. A few informal paths lead northeast along the escarpment but none have better views that right at the lookout. Retrace your steps for about 1.3 miles back to the Escarpment Trail. After walking along the path bounded by laurel for about .8 miles you will be at Inspiration Point with a further .2 miles putting you at Sunset Rock South. Both of these viewpoint offer great views across Kaaterskill Clove and down into the clove itself. The high Peak and Round Top are right across from these lookouts. The houses of Twilight Park seems to had on the edge of the mountain. From Sunset Rock the trail starts to descend for about .5 miles with some descents being steep. The trail then turn sharply right to head back to the Schutt Road lot. At this bend is a stone monument with a plaque commemorating the death of a firefighter who was killed fighting a fire in the early 20th century. From the Layman Memorial the trail ascends and then flattens. It passes by several side trail. Stay on the Escarpment Trail for 1.2 miles and cross Schutt Road to get back to the car. This 15 mile hike is long (obviously) with several challenging ascent and descents. However, once you have done this hike there isn’t much around North South Lake that you have missed!

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly clockwise direction.)
northsouthlakeall_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


North South Lake: Palenville Lookoutnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 7.8 mi. 1300 ft. GPSies

palenvilleview_map The hiking trails around the North Lake South Lake Campgrounds may be the most scenic in the Catskills. As you hike the Escarpment Trail the history and the views just seem to get better with every passing mile. Many spots have names like Inspiration Point and Artist’s Rock. Even places that aren’t named have beautiful views of the Hudson River and surrounding countryside. Turn north on Rt 18 from Rt 23A in the town of Haines Falls. After about 1 mile, turn right on Schutt Road just before the entrance to the state campgrounds. Turn left into the parking area. Walk across Schutt Road to the beginning of the blue marked Escarpment Trail. Several different trails intersect the Escarpment Trail at different places. Some of these trails are horse trails of snowmobile trails and not all are well marked. Stay on the blue Escarpment trail for about .65 miles as it descends slightly and crosses an old railroad grade. Cross a bridge and then make a quick left on the a right onto the red Schutt Road Trail. Stay on this trail for about .25 miles and then turn onto a yellow trail on the right. Continue on the yellow trail for .35 miles before turn left on the blue Escarpment Trail. In about .35 miles you will be at Sunset Point which is marked with a sign. Another .35 miles brings you to a sign that announces Inspiration Point. In about .55 miles the Escarpment Trail turns sharply left and the red Harding Road Trail continues straight ahead. Walk on the Harding Road trail for several hundred feet until it turns right in a near 180 degree bend and head DOWN. At this point continue ahead on the horse trail for .85 miles as it winds and switchbacks its way down. At the base of a steep, short hill turn right and walk .55 miles out to the Palenville Lookout. After taking in the sights retrace your steps back to where you took the right and turn right. Walk along the horse trail for .8 miles looking for some trail up to the higher levels. At this point a snowmobile trail heads up toward the beach area of North Lake. From hear walk .15 miles up to the empty field that was the site of the Catskill mountain House. Retrace your steps back to the roads that loop around the lakes and turn left to follow the roads .6 miles to the west, outlet end of South Lake. Take in the view and then continue .5 miles back to the gatehouse. Walk .1 miles out passed the gatehouse and turn left on Schutt Road. Walk .15 miles down Schutt Road and back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly counterclockwise direction.)
palenvilleview_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


North South Lake: Palenville Lookout (Big Loop)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 7.9 mi. 1195 ft. GPSies

palenville_map The hiking trails around the North Lake South Lake Campgrounds may be the most scenic in the Catskills. As you hike the Escarpment Trail the history and the views just seem to get better with every passing mile. Many spots have names like Inspiration Point and Artist’s Rock. Even places that aren’t named have beautiful views of the Hudson River and surrounding countryside. Turn north on Rt 18 from Rt 23A in the town of Haines Falls. After about 1 mile, turn right on Schutt Road just before the entrance to the state campgrounds. Turn left into the parking area. Walk across Schutt Road to the beginning of the blue marked Escarpment Trail. Several different trails intersect the Escarpment Trail at different places. Some of these trails are horse trails of snowmobile trails and not all are well marked. Stay on the blue Escarpment trail for about .65 miles as it descends slightly and crosses an old railroad grade. Cross a bridge and then make a quick left on the a right onto the red Schutt Road Trail. Stay on this trail for about .25 miles and then turn onto a yellow trail on the right. Continue on the yellow trail for .35 miles before turn left on the blue Escarpment Trail. In about .35 miles you will be at Sunset Point which is marked with a sign. Another .35 miles brings you to a sign that announces Inspiration Point. In about .55 miles the Escarpment Trail turns sharply left and the red Harding Road Trail continues straight ahead. Walk on the Harding Road trail for several hundred feet until it turns right in a near 180 degree bend and head DOWN. At this point continue ahead on the horse trail for .85 miles as it winds and switchbacks its way down. At the base of a steep, short hill turn right and walk .55 miles out to the Palenville Lookout. After taking in the sights retrace your steps back to where you took the right and turn right. Walk along the horse trail for .8 miles looking for some trail up to the higher levels. At this point a snowmobile trail heads up toward the beach area of North Lake. From hear walk .15 miles up to the empty field that was the site of the Catskill mountain House. Retrace your steps back to the roads that loop around the lakes and turn left to follow the roads .6 miles to the west, outlet end of South Lake. Take in the view and then continue .5 miles back to the gatehouse. Walk .1 miles out passed the gatehouse and turn left on Schutt Road. Walk .15 miles down Schutt Road and back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a roughly counterclockwise direction.)
palenville_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


North South Lake: Palenville Lookout (Sleepy Hollow)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 8.8 mi. 2007 ft. GPSies

palenvillesleepy_map The hiking trails around the North Lake South Lake Campgrounds may be the most scenic in the Catskills. As you hike the Escarpment Trail the history and the views just seem to get better with every passing mile. Many spots have names like Inspiration Point and Artist’s Rock. Even places that aren’t named have beautiful views of the Hudson River and surrounding countryside. This hike requires two cars for a car shuttle or you will have to double the mileage! Turn north on White Road just west of Palenville on Route 23A. Bear left and park one car in the parking area. Drive back down White Road to Route 23A and turn left. Take the next left on Bogart Road Drive to the junction with Mountain House road and turn left. Drive to the gate and park on the side of the road but DO NOT block the gate. Get on the wide woods road that leads up to the escarpment. The first 1 mile of the hike parallels Stony Brook and there are numerous falls and rapids along the way. Many of these falls are on private property. At 1 mile the trail turns to the left and crosses Stony Brook on a bridge. At this point there is a rock upstream from the bridge that, in the Legend of Sleepy Hollow, was Rip Van Winkle’s resting place. This was also the site of the Rip Van Winkle house. The trail now heads generally south with one large switchback as it continues its ascent for the next 1.9 miles. Watch to your left along the way for several nice viewpoints. At 3.3 miles the trail crosses of right-of-way which was originally cut for the Otis Elevating Railway. The railway hauled passengers from the valley to the Catskill Mountain House. This area of the trail is often VERY wet. At 3.8 miles there is a trail junction and you should continue straight ahead to go to the Palenville Lookout which is about a .5 mile walk. At the main part of the lookout there is the remains of a foundation and some stone furniture that hikers have constructed. The view from here is outstanding particularly on a clear day. Palenville is just below but you can see out to the Hudson and beyond. You may walk along the escarpment to the left for some additional views. When you are ready, walk back up the trail and turn on the path to the left that takes you out to another lookout. This viewpoint better allows you to look back up Kaaterskill Clove. Back on the main trail walk to the trail junction, turn left and get ready for a short but steep ascent that approaches a 30% grade! The horse trail will continue to climb for the next .85 miles to a trail junction. Turn left on Harding Road. This road was constructed to bring materials to the plateau to build the Kaaterskill Hotel owned by George Harding. This road props 00 feet over the next 2.4 Niles and has several switchbacks that were needed to allow horse drawn wagons to make the grade. Watch to your right along the way for viewpoints. There is at least one stream crossing but you will not get your feet wet. At the end of the road a short trail takes you the additional .5 miles to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route which is a one-way affair.)
palenvillesleepy_pro
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North South Lake: Stoppel Pointnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 7.6 mi. 1496 ft. GPSies

nsstoppel_map The hiking trails around the North Lake South Lake Campgrounds may be the most scenic in the Catskills. As you hike the Escarpment Trail the history and the views just seem to get better with every passing mile. Many spots have names like Inspiration Point and Artist’s Rock. Even places that aren’t named have beautiful views of the Hudson River and surrounding countryside. There are many combinations of paths that can ;lead to Stopple Point. This path is the shortest and most direct. Turn north on Rt 18 from Rt 23A in the town of Haines Falls. After about 1 mile, turn right on Schutt Road just before the entrance to the state campgrounds. Turn right into the parking area. Walk up Schutt Road and across CR-18 to the yellow marked Rock Shelter Trail. Follow this trail for 1.3 miles where it intersects the Mary’s Glen Trail. Turn left and follow the Mary’s Glen Trail .8 miles to the blue blazed Escarpment Trail. Turn left on the Escarpment Trail toward North Point. Be prepared to CLIMB as you ascend .2 miles to North Point. Take in the views of the lakes and campgrounds below. Stay on the Escarpment Trail as it rises for another .35 miles to an area near the summit of North Mountain. Continue on the Escarpment Trail for another 1.4 miles to an open rock ledge which is Stoppel Point. Enjoy the views to the north and east before turning around and retracing your steps. If you want, continue on the Escarpment Trail for another .5 miles to the wreckage of an old airplane before turning around.

(The map shows the parking area and the out-and-back hiking route.)
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(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Onteora Lakenew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.1 mi. 884 ft. GPSies

 

onteoralake_mapBluestone State Forest is near Kingston. There are two sets of trails in the area that are used for both hiking and mountain biking. There are three trail loops near Onteora Lake and another set of trails just east of Onteora Lake on Jockey Hill. Drive west on Route 28 from Kingston. The parking area is clearly marked on the right with a sign for Onteora Lake. Drive through the gate at the far end of the upper parking area to get to the lower lot. Begin your hike by headeding out on the yellow trail which starts north on the west side of the lake. The first part of the trail has been made handicapped accessible and has a few picnic tables. The trail then shifts to a woods road which begins to get rocky pretty quickly. At .7 miles the trail turns around the north end of the lake and changes from northeast to almost due south. At .8 miles the yellow trail splits. Stay to the left. At .9 miles turn left at the junction with the red trail to begin the red loop. All three loops are “lollipops” with a “handle” that leads in to the loop and then back out again. At 1.3 miles you will be at the point where the red loop starts. Stay left as the trail climbs from the point where the red trail starts and reaches the highest point on the hike at 1.6 miles. Along the way the trail has some ups and downs but only gains a little over 200 feet from the point where the yellow loops splits. There are no real views along the way but the trail passes through some boulders and is generally fun to hike. The blazes are spaced a little farther apart than usual but this may be because it is maintained by the mountain bike club and they move a little faster than hikers. As you continue on the red loop the trail gets considerably rockier and more narrow in some areas. There are a few blowdowns across the trail. Some are low enough to jump on a bike but others require dismounting. At 2 miles the red loop makes a turn and heads south climbing another hill. At 2.5 miles the blue trial appears on the left. Turn here to access the blue trail loop. The handle of this trail is the shortest and in about .15 miles the trail splis to begin the loop. Stay to the left immediately dropping about 100 feet as you head north and east. At 3.1 miles the trail turnes southeast to loop back to where the blue trail started and gains the elevation lost at the beginning. The blue trail is by far the rockiest of the three trails and has areas where even the most experienced mountain biker would have problems. Once you are back at the trail junction with the red trail continue almost straight ahead to get back onto the red trail. DO NOT turn left on the well-used path as it is not part of the blazed loops. The red trail goes east for about .25 miles to the point where the red trail splits. Turn left and follow the handle .4 miles southwest back to the yellow trail. Turn left on the yellow trail which heads southwest for about .6 miles to the shores of Pickerel Pond. This pond is more interesting in some ways than Onteora Lake. The yellow trail follows the western shore of the pond for a short distance and then turns west at 5.3 miles to cross over to the eastern shore of Onteora Lake. Once on the shore of the lake the trail heads northeast for.7 miles back to the point where the yellow trail splits. The trail is sited on a ridge that runs along the eastern shore and does not offer many views. The trail rolls up and down a little and at one point passes between some rocks and up an incline. At 5.6 miles turn left to head back to the parking area on the yellow trail retracing your path from earlier. Watch for obvious signs of bluestone quarrying.

(The map above shows the parking area and “lollipop” hiking route.)

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(The image above shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Overlook Mountain: Kaaterskill PAnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 10.6 mi. 2236 ft. GPSies

overlook_map There are two trails that lead to Overlook Mountain and the sites found there. One trail comes up from Meads Road and is about 5 miles or less round trip. This trail is actually an access road to the WTZA-TV transmission tower and the state fire tower at the top of the mountain. The trail described Here starts at or near the Kaaterskill PA and then continues across The Catskill Center Platte Clove Preserve. This trail is almost 11 miles long round trip but offers the opportunity to visit Echo Lake. In Tannersville, find Platte Clove Road. Travel along this road until you find a pull-off on the right for the Catskill Center Platte Clove Preserve. Parking here is limited. If there are no spaces, continue for a short distance and turn into the Kaaterskill parking area on the left. Sign in at the trail register. The first feature of the trail you will notice is a reconstruction of a post and tenon bridge across the creek. The Catskill Center has provided “labels” for some of the trees and handy signs to explain the role of the bluestone quarries in this area. After about a mile the red-blazed Devil’s Path begins on the left. Continue straight ahead on the blue-blazed Overlook Trail. In just .2 miles you will be at the Devil’s Kitchen lean-to. Another 2 miles brings you to the turn-off to Echo Lake. This spur trail is blazed in yellow and is about .6 miles long. The descent and subsequent ascent is steep and rocky. Echo Lake is a beautiful, natural lake surrounded by mountains. There is a lean-to on the shore. Continue another 1.5 miles to the ruins of the Overlook Mountain Mountain House and the WTZA-TV tower. The ruins are interesting and only the stone building blocks remain. A trail continues .5 miles up to the Overlook Fire Tower. This tower sits on a prominent rock plateau. It offers spectacular views of the Ashokan Reservoir, the Mountain House ruins and the surrounding hills and valleys. Try to pick a clear day to that your view and the pictures you take are not cloudy by the haze that can hang in the air. Return the same way you came for a round-trip of just under 11 miles.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route. A stop by Echo Lake is shown on the way back.)

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(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Overlook Mountain: Meades Mountain Roadnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 4.7 mi. 1409 ft. GPSies

overlookmeades_map There are two trails that lead to Overlook Mountain and the sites found there. One trail comes up from Meads Road and is about 5 miles or less round trip. This trail is actually an access road to the WTZA-TV transmission tower and the state fire tower at the top of the mountain. The trail described Here starts at or near the Kaaterskill PA and then continues across The Catskill Center Platte Clove Preserve. This trail is almost 11 miles long round trip but offers the opportunity to visit Echo Lake. Finding the trailhead for the Meades Mountain Road route may be the hardest part of the hike. Head south and east from Phoenicia on Route 28. In about 4 miles turn east on Route 212. Route 212 heads generally east. Just passed Cooper’s Lake turn left on Church Road. At the T turn left and then turn/bear right on Meades Mountain Road which may also be marked McDaniel Road. Drive for about 2.5 miles until a parking area appears on the left. Park your car and get on the access road to the tower. After walking about 1.75 miles on the road, the ruins of the Overlook Mountain House will be straight ahead. Look around the ruins. When done continue on the trail on the other side. The trail from Platte Clove and Echo lake will come in on the left. In about .4 miles you will be at the cabin. Turn left to go to the fire tower. On the way back walk behind the cabin and walk to the viewpoint that give Overlook Mountain its name. Follow the road back to your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route. A stop by Echo Lake is shown on the way back.)

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(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Pelnor Hollow: Pelnor Hollow Road to Lean-tonew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 4.0 mi. 830 ft. GPSies

pelnorleanto_map This short hike doesn’t gain much elevation but leads to a nice, secluded lean-to. Head out of Roscoe on Route 206. Turn right on Berry Brook Road just after the county line and drive for around 3 miles. Turn left on Pelnor Hollow Road. Pelnor Hollow Road turns to a dirt road quickly and soon becomes a “track” which is barely passable by car. The road functionally ends at a small cabin on the left. You may turn around at the cabin and back up the road to park. Be aware that this is probably NOT a good idea. There area two alternatives to driving this part of the road and parking at the end. You may try to get permission to park from the homeowner just before the dirt road ends. Another possibility is to park further down the road and walk the extra mile or so up the track and passed the cabin. From the last cabin on the road walk slightly uphill on a wide woods road which travels through mostly hardwood forest with a couple of open spots. After about .3 miles a sign shows .5 miles to the lean-to. Continued to hike until the lean-to appears on the left of the trail at just less than 1 mile. You may continue on the trail but be aware that in pricker season this can be a bloody affair. The trail is not well maintained and although the terrain is not difficult the briars can be deadly. In late fall and winter the going is considerably easier and many choices are possible. The junction with the Mary Smith Trail is about 2.3 miles away. At that junction it is possible to turn right on the Mary Smith Trail and hike about 1.2 miles to Berry Brook road. You can also hike a short distance to the Spilt Rock Lookout. Beyond the lookout is the junction with the Spring Brook Trail or the opportunity to hike through to Route 206. How far you want to go just depends on you.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

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(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Pelnor Hollow: Mary Smith Trailhead to Lean-tonew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.2 mi. 1844 ft. GPSies

pelnorms_map Head north from Roscoe on Route 206. Turn right on Berry Brook Road just after the county line and drive for around 8 miles to the trail head parking on the right. Cross the road to get on the Mary Smith Trail heading west southwest. After about .1 miles on a woods road, you will cross a power line right-of-way. Watch for the trail as it continues through a grassy area and into the woods. The trail ascends some until about .45 miles when it levels off if only briefly. In only .2 miles the trail again ascends for the next .5 miles to 1.15 miles where it meets the Pelnor Hollow Trail. At this point you may choose to turn left and go directly to the lean-to or you may visit the Split Rock Lookout. To visit the lookout turn right and after a short distance you will be faced with a VERY STEEP downhill section. At 1.3 miles you will arrive at the Split Rock Lookout with some great views to the west. Notice the house across the way on the ridge. When you have taken in the view, return the way you came to the trail junction and continue straight ahead. The hike to the lean-to is a pleasant walk through hardwood forest. There are some limited views of other ridges but none that allow photography. You will be treated to a large number of glacial erratics along the way. The prickers in spring and summer can be fierce so this hike is better left to late fall or winter. You will hike down from the trail junction losing about 300 feet before climbing the next hill and then hiking down to the Lena-to losing 465 feet. The total distance to the lean-to from the trail junction is 2.3 miles. Retrace your steps back to the junction with the Mary Smith Trail. Turn right and hike the 1.2 miles back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

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(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Platte Clove Preserve: The Fallsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 2.0 mi. 300 ft.

This short hike doesn’t gain much elevation but leads to a series of falls in Platte Clove. Park at the Platte Clove Preserve “cabin” on Platte Clove Road just west of the Kaaterskill High Peak parking area. Walk toward the cabin and down the road next to it. Follow the trail down to the stream bed. It is steep in places but the distance is minimal. At the dead end you will be looking at Plattekill Falls. The .2 mile walk brings you to one of the most beautiful falls in the Catskills. The “look” of the falls varies during each season so visit at least four times! Walk back up the path to the cabin but continue to walk passed on the trail. The falls below the king post bridge is Old Mill Falls. You may observe the falls from the near side or cross over the bridge to see it from the far shore. Taking pictures from the rocks downstream from the falls allows some great shots but BE CAREFUL on the slippery rocks!

Poet’s Ledge and Wildcat Fallsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.1 mi. 2386 ft. GPSies

poet_map This trail is part of the Long Path stretching from Fort Lee, NJ to Thacher Park near Albany. Poet’s Ledge and Wildcat Falls are two point of interest on the trail. Beyond Wildcat Falls is Buttermilk Falls. The trail leads to the snowmobile trail that run around Kaaterskill High Peak and Round Top. A bushwhack from the snowmobile trail leads up to the High Peak. Take Route 23A from Palenville toward Haines Falls if you are coming from the east or from Haines Falls to Palenville if coming from the west. Park on the north side of 23A near Palenville near where the road cross Kaaterskill Creek. Walk on the road to the east and cross over to a “street” that goes to the right just before the road crosses the creek. Watch for the aqua blazes of the Long Path. This street is now blocked and closed to traffic. It has been overgrown with vegetation and only the paved surface here and there separates it from any other trail. On the other end of this short path you will be back on paved road. The blazes will continue for a short distance and the direct you to turn up a short street/driveway. Blue markers now appear in addition to the blaze. After a few feet, the trail turns onto a woods road and into the forest. The path ascends on the wood road, leveling at times, but always continuing upward. After less than a mile, the trail again cuts right and starts serious climb up! The trail has several switchbacks and there are hints of views to the right. Continue on this trail which levels at times and then becomes much steeper. in about 1.25 miles there is an obvious lookout to the right. The lookout gives a glimpse of the Clove below and the mountains to the north. Continue on the main path for another half mile. At this point a sign points to a yellow spur trail that DESCENDS to Poet’s Ledge. The descent is worth it since the view is very nice. As you descend you will pass a large, flat expanse of rock with several fire circles. There is a view from here but this is NOT Poet’s Ledge. After another short descent through some rocks you will be on the Ledge. The Ledge gives an unobstructed view of Kaaterskill Clove and Route 23A below. To the left is South Mountain and the Escarpment Trail. On the right looming above the Ledge is Kaaterskill High Peak. The Ledge is at 2200 feet but the mountain is another 1400 feet of vertical gain. After visiting Poet’s Ledge and returning to the main trail you may retrace your steps to the car. You may also choose to visit Wildcat Falls, Buttermilk Falls and the High Peak itself.

(The map shows the parking area and the out-and-back hiking route.)
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(The image is the vertical profile for the out and back hike so it has a symmetrical appearance. )


Pratt’s Rocknew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 2.0 mi. 669 ft. Unavailable

prattsrock_map Prattsville is a wide spot in the road just east of Grand Gorge. The area has some nice hiking trails including the Long Path over Huntersfield Mountain and a park containing Pratts Rock. Pratt was a local businessman and politician. He commissioned a stone cutter to carve various images in a rocky cliff. These images are still there and are very interesting. The view from the top of Pratts Rock is equally impressive. There are several ways to find the parking area. Drive north for 6 miles from the junction of Route 23A and Route 42 west of Hunter. Turn right on Route 23 and drive for .5 miles. The parking area is on the left. Drive 9 miles west on Route 23 from the village of Windham. the parking area will be on the right. Drive 14 miles on Route 23 from the junction of Route 30 and Route 23 in Grand Gorge. Turn left in Prattsville to stay on Route 23. The parking are will be on the left after .5 miles. From the parking area hike up to the information kiosk and then through the park. The trail is marked and at some point you should be able to see the cliffs with their whitewashed images through the trees. Stay on the trail as it winds around behind the “rock”. Shortly you will be on the viewpoint above the images. The views here are magnificent particularly those down to Schoharie Creek and across the valley. You may walk along the edge of the cliffs as more viewpoints at different angles lie along this path. When you have had enough, you may continue straight ahead and inspect some small “caves” in the cliffs at the top. From here you can drop down a short, steep path that warps around to the front of Pratt Rock. You may also double back the way you came and follow another, more gentle path down to the viewing area below the images. From the images a trail leads back down into the park and to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the clockwise hiking route.)
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(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Quick Lake from Frick Pondnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 13.7 mi. 2400 ft. GPSies

Quick Lake (Frick Pond)_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the red-blazed Quick Lake trail and follow it for .5 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Logger’s Loop. Bear left and walk down the hill to the outlet of Frick Pond where you should cross the stream on the bridge. At the next trail junction bear right on the Quick Lake trail. At 1.5 miles you will be at Iron Wheel Junction where the Logger’s Loop Trail turns right. Stay on the Quick Lake Trail by bearing left and walk up the hill about .2 miles to a junction with a snowmobile trail. Turn left here for the fastest route to Quick Lake. It is possible to continue north to Junkyard Junction and then turn left on the Quick Lake Trail but this adds distance to an already long hike! The rest of your hike will alternate between snowmobile trail and the Quick Lake Trail. At some points the signs and blazes are confusing but as long as you are headed generally north and west toward Quick Lake you will get there. Follow the snowmobile trail until about 4.3 miles where you will meet the Quick Lake trail again. Turn left here and follow the Quick Lake trail as you now turn west toward Quick Lake. Stay on the trail until about 6.3 miles where the trail turns right and heads north to make a big loop before heading south to the lake. At this point continue on the snowmobile trail as it starts a long descent to Quick Lake. Near the lake you will again pick up the Quick Lake Trail. Visit the lean-to by Quick Lake and take some pictures. The “lake” is very low at times and is rather small. When you are ready, retrace your route back to the car. You may want to try some variations but remember that the route described here is already over 13 miles long!

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)
Quick Lake (Frick Pond)_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Red Hill Fire Towernew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 2.3 mi. 997 ft. GPSies

redhill_map Turn onto Rt. 55A in Grahamsville near the Rondout Reservoir. After about 2.25 miles look for Sugarloaf Rd. on your left. Continue on Sugarloaf Rd. for about 4 miles and look for Red Hill Rd. on the left. Make this sharp turn. Dinch or Coons Rd. will be on your left almost immediately. Continue on this road for a little over one mile. The road is not paved. It is a dead end and it gets rough enough that an SUV or a pickup might be a good idea. Park at the trail head. Look for signs to the trail and follow the yellow markers. After about .56 miles the slope increases slightly and increases again at .75 miles. After about 1.2 miles you are at the summit. Climb the fire tower for some nice views. Reverse your route. A quick, relatively easy hike with a reward at the top.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route.)

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(The image shows the profile of the loop hiking route. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Rochester Hollownew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 3.9 mi. 1100 ft. GPSies

rochester_map From Route 28 between Big Indian and Highmont look for Matayas Road. The road just west of this road is the access road to Rochester Hollow. Turn north and go to the end of the road to the parking area. This is a particularly popular spot during winter when people use it for cross country skiing and snowshoeing. To start the hike simply begin to walk up the wide woods road. The road parallels a brook. Watch along the way for some stone columns. At 1.7 miles the road turns sharply west. Walk straight ahead into the woods to find some interesting ruins. When you have finished exploring, return the way you came.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)
rochester_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Rochester Hollow Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 6.2 mi. 1262 ft. GPSies

Rochester Hollow (Loop)_map From Route 28 between Big Indian and Highmont look for Matayas Road. The road just west of this road is the access road to Rochester Hollow. Turn north and go to the end of the road to the parking area. This is a particularly popular spot during winter when people use it for cross country skiing and snowshoeing. To start the hike simply begin to walk up the wide woods road. The road parallels a brook. Watch along the way for some stone columns. At 1.7 miles the road turns sharply west. Walk straight ahead into the woods to find some interesting ruins. When you have finished exploring, continue on around the bend and look for a monument to John Burroughs on the right. Follow the trail around and out to Rose Mountain Road. You will pass a lean-to on the right. A short stretch of this trail passes through PRIVATE PROPERTY so make sure you obtain permission to hike here. If you cannot obtain permission, turn around and retrace your route back to the car. Once you make the left turn onto Rose Mountain Road it is about 1.4 miles down to Route 28 where you will turn left. Walk .6 miles back to the access road and another .3 miles back to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)
Rochester Hollow (Loop)_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Romer Mt: Long Path from Lane Streetnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 7.4 mi. 1960 ft. GPSies

romermtphoenicia_map Turn onto Woodland Valley Road from Route 28 west of Phoenicia . After crossing the bridge over the Esopus Creek turn left on High Street even though there may be no sign. Watch for Lane Street on your right after about .5 miles. Turn right on Lane Street and drive to the end and make a right to cross over a small stream. Park in the parking area. This trail was created to move the Long Path from a road walk which was all the way from Tremper Mountain to Woodland Valley Campgrounds to a trail hike. The trail ascends the shoulder of Romer Mountain and then stays on the ridge over Mount Pleasant and Cross Mountain. It joins the trail to Wittenberg just south of the trail junction with the trail to the Terrace Mountain lean-to. It is best hiked with a car spot so that you can hike all the way from one end to the other rather than turning around somewhere in the middle or hiking over 15 miles. The trail ascends the shoulder of Romer Mountain using a series of switchbacks. There aren’t many views along the way but the walk is pleasant.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

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(The image shows the profile of the out and back hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)



Romer Mt: Long Path from Woodland Valley to Lane Streetnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 11.2 mi. 2805 ft. GPSies

This hike requires a car spot or a drop off as the one-way distance is 11.2 miles! Turn onto Woodland Valley Road from Route 28 west of Phoenicia . After crossing the bridge over the Esopus Creek turn left on High Street even though there may be no sign. Watch for Lane Street on your right after about .5 miles. Turn right on Lane Street and drive to the end and make a right to cross over a small stream. Park one car in the parking area. Drive back on Woodland valley Road to the Woodland Valley Campgrounds. Park another car in the lot here and pay the parking fee at the booth or have someone drop you at the lot. Walk across the road and through some campsites to find the beginning of the trail on a ridge that crosses a stream. The first mile of trail from the bridge gains 920 feet at an almost 18% grade. The trail continues to ascend for another .75 miles before leveling off some. Once the trail levels off it has only a few ups and downs until the junction with the trail to Terrace Mountain at 2.5 miles. Turn right at this junction and start toward Wittenberg. The new trail is about .2 miles further along the main trail on the left at 2.7 miles. Turn left onto the new trail which has bBlue markers indicating that it is an extension of the Pine Hill – West Branch Trail. There is also an official Long Path marker as well.The surface of the trail is smooth and flat at the beginning but changes to rocky and back to smooth any number of times. At 3.5 miles you may see a path that leads to the site of the camp the trail crew used when they stayed in the woods to work on the trail! At 3.5 miles descend the first staircase which is very nicely constructed. Remember that the trail crew members were working only with hand tools and the stones and rocks available around them! Walk along the edge of a dropoff and at 3.7 miles you will come upon an open rock face with beautiful views to the north and east. Turn to my left to see the imposing bulk of Wittenberg looking down at you. To the north are the mountains of the Devil’s Path. The views are spectacular! Continue on your way down the rock face and descend for the next quarter mile. You are actually still on a ridge and lose only about 250 feet. Watch to your right for possible lookouts. At 4.75 miles you will start to ascend Cross Mountain. There is a limited lookout on the right with some views of the Ashokan Reservoir. A few hundred feet further along there is another, better viewpoint. If you climb a little more and there is a third lookout with the best views of all. Get back on the main trail and continue over the top of Cross Mountain and then down the other side. You will skirt the summit of Mount Pleasant at about 6.5 miles into the hike. There is another great lookout on the left of the trail with an almost 180 degree field of view. Only the view to the north is partially blocked. From the lookout there is a drop of about 600 feet to the 8 mile point where there is a slight climb over an unnamed bump. Once you are over the top of Romer Mountain there is less than 3 miles to the car and it is all downhill. Near the bottom, a series of switchbacks turns a quarter mile hike into almost of mile of trail!

(The map shows one way hiking route which requires a drop off or a car spot.)

(The image shows the profile of the out and back hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)



Route 10 to Barlow Notch
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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 8.2 mi 1864 ft GPSies

In the village of Windham find Route 21 north. Drive 4.5 miles north and turn right onto Route 10. Route 10 will make a sharp left up a hill. Park in the first pulloff on the right. The trail crosses just south of the pulloff. The first .7 miles of trail descends through some hardwoods and then is flat until the junction of Cunningham and Sutton Roads. Walk across the road intersection and pick up the trail on the other side. It starts out on an old road but quickly turns right into the forest and over the next 1.2 miles gains over 850 feet. The trail passes east of the summit of Mount Nebo in a generally south or southeast direction. You will start to ascend Mount Hayden by sidehilling around the west shoulder and passing the summit. The trail turns sharply east and climbs the final 125 feet to the top. There are no viewpoints along the way although there are some places where views might be available when the leaves are off the trees. The summit of Mount Hayden is 2.1 miles into the hike. Along some parts of the trail blazes are few and far between in some critical places. Over the next mile the trail heads first east and then southeast on a one mile descent to Barlow Notch. You will lose 675 feet and walk through some steep sections and some switchbacks. Near the bottom of the descent the trail meets a woods road which is actually marked on some maps and GPS devices. Continue on the trail watching for the Sutton plaque on the left side of the trail. The plaque is not far from where the trail meets the woods road about 3.1 miles from the car. Turn around and follow the trail back toward the car. By the time you get back to Cunningham Road and climb the last .7 miles to Route 10 the ascent may seem a little more challenging than you thought it might be.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)
(The image shows the profile of the out and back hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Russell Brook Bushwhacknew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 3.6 mi. 1035 ft. GPSies

Russell Brook (bushwhack)_map This is one of our favorite trails when we just want to hike. It has several variations for distance and difficulty. Like most trails, hiking one way is different than hiking in the other direction. We have take this route more than a dozen times this season and it is interesting to watch the changing seasons. It is unfortunate that Russell Brook Road is closed due to the frequent floods that have washed out the road. Turn left on Morton Hill Road on Route 206 just after the Rockland Flats. Bear right up Morton Hill Road until you see a parking area on the left near the sign indicates Russell Brook Road is closed.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

Park here and hike down Russell Brook Road .3 miles to a gated snowmobile trail on the right. Turn here an walk along the snowmobile trail until the trail turns left at .6 miles. You may turn left an follow the snowmobile trail up and over the ridge and then down to the pond. Continue straight ahead to begin a bushwhack that parallels Russell Brook in a northeast direction. At about 1 mile find a place to cross the stream and head north and then northwest and west to climb over a hill. The way is steep in places with over a 23% grade. From the top of the hill head west to get down to Cable’s Lake. You may find several different woods roads in this area which will make the descent easier. Once on the trail turn left and head back on the trail to the main trailhead on Russell Brook Road. Walk up Russell Brook Road to get back to the parking area on Morton Hill Road.

Russell Brook (bushwhack)_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Samuel’s Pointnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 4.7 mi. 2135 ft. GPSies

Samuels Point_map From Grahamsville, turn onto Route 52A near the TriValley School. Stay on the road until the hamlet of Sundown where the road turns left. Bear to the right on Peekamoose Rd. and continue on the road looking for Moonhaw Rd. on the left. From Route 28, turn west on Route 28A and then head south. Turn right and head west on Watson Hollow Road, the road that goes to Peekamoose and Sundown. Watch for Moonhaw Road on the right after about mile. Turn onto Moonhaw Rd. and drive to the end. Park on the right just before the gates to the private driveway. Since this is a bushwhack all the way your route may vary. From the parking area, cross Wittenberg Brook and turn left to walk parallel to the brook on a woods road. If you have the right woods road, you should be able to walk north for about 1 miles before heading to the east and UP the steep side of the mountain. As you climb try to steer toward the col between Samuel’s Point to the east an the hill to the west. Once in the col, turn east toward Samuel’s Point which is only .5 miles away. As you start to get into heavy stands of laurel, cut around them and head south as they are too thick to get through easily. Walk around the laurel and start to head up toward the highest point you can see which is Samuel’s Point. Many of the views of the Ashokan Reservoir are bloat by trees but you can walk around to find some views between them. Walk to the edge of the ledges and then head north to walk counterclockwise around the edge. You may get some nice views from here. When you are done, retrace your steps back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

Samuels Point_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Segar Trailnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

 

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.3 mi. 1560 ft. GPSies

segar_map Finding this trail head can be challenging depending on your approach. The easiest way is to go to Arkville on Rt. 28. Turn south onto Dry Brook Road. Take this road ALL the way to the dead end and park at the trail head. Get on the yellow trail and follow it carefully. Pay attention to the yellow trail markers and the signs. Several old logging roads intersect the trails and can mislead you if you are not paying attention. This trail also runs through private property. Be sure to respect the rights of the property owners! There are at least four stream crossing that can prove difficult if not impossible when the water is high. Be prepared to wade, get wet or turn back! Nettles during the spring and summer are plentiful but can be avoided. From this trail it is possible to approach Doubletop, the highest peak in the Catskills without a trail, from several directions. The trail intersects the Pine Hill-West Branch Trail at its highest point. Turning left leads to Eagle after about 1 mile. Turning right takes you to Big Indian. Remember that the trail DOES NOT go to the top of Big Indian. The actual summit is about .25 miles north of the highest point on the trail.

(The map shows the parking area and the out-and-back hiking route.)
segar_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Shavertown Parcelnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 4.7 mi. 1050 ft. GPSies

ShavertownParcel_map Drive to the north end of the bridge that crosses the Pepacton Reservoir. Head northwest of BWS Road #4 which is also County Route 1 and is sometimes know as the Tremperskill Road. The trailhead is just .15 miles up this road on the right. You may park off the road on the left or at the boat launch at the end of the bridge. Cross the road to begin your hike. The first .25 miles of the trail climbs 200 feet as it heads directly north and up the side of Perch Lake Mountain. Soon the trail turns right on an old access road and continues to climb through the forest for another .25 miles. You will break out into a field and the trail levels a little. Along this part of the trail you may see some meteorological instruments with solar panels for power. The trail now turns northeast and descends to the edge of a small pond at .85 miles. In the summer, the pond may have both pink and white water lilies growing in it as well as cattails around the edge. Walk around the pond on the west side to an outstanding lookout over the Pepacton. Continue around the pond and walk back to the trail that you came in on. Turned left at the sign that marks the turn for the extra 1.5 miles. This trail follows another woods road and gains a little over 200 feet in the next .5 miles. Watch for trail markers carefully! At around 1.5 miles into the hike the trail drops to the left off the woods road to travel through an area with large boulders. Many are covered by interesting mosses and lichens. Once the trail rejoins the road it remains pretty flat for the next .8 miles. The trail begins to turn around the mountain heading a little to the east. Follow the trail markers carefully and stay on the trail as the DEP land is surrounded by private property! The trail makes a little loop and then comes back to the trail you came in on. Follow this trail back the way you came to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the out-and-back hiking route.)
ShavertownParcel_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Ski Plattekillnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 3.2 mi. 1230 ft. GPSies

skiplattekill_map Walking the trails at the Ski Plattekill ski hills is interesting. The view is great and even in the summer the hill is used for downhill mountain biking. Head north from Margaretville on Route 30 through Halcottsville. Watch for signs for Ski Plattekill turn west off Route 30 and follow Upper Meeker Hollow Road until Lower Meeker Hollow Road bears left. Continue on Lower Meeker Hollow Road until you are at the ski center, Park in the parking lot and go to the office to check in. The people at the office are very polite and usually offer a map of the hill and suggestions on where to hike. One way to start is to head up the beginners hill on the left as you walk out the back of the lodge. Take the Overlook Trail toward North PlattekillTry to avoid going too high up the slope as you will hit some rather steep ski runs. The map from the ski hill only shows the ski runs at not the extensive network of bike trails. The bike trails toward North Plattekill are truly impressive! They are steep and rocky with many jumps. Some have padded trees. Continue to walk UP and head for the highest point on North Plattekill. Watch for good views as you climb. When you get near the highest point, you may have to go off trail to find the exact location. You may return the way you came but it is better to walk across the top of the ski hill and descend by the Powder Puff Trail on the other side. In this way you can look down many of the ski runs and chair lifts to get the best views. This route also climbs the second highest point on the slopes. The Plunge has some nice views but it may not be too clear how to get across the top of the rest of the hill. Keep walking on trails, paths or bushwhack your own way to the central slopes area with the Blockbuster. The views are magnificent from here since it is a steep run and the hill falls away quickly. In addition, there is no lift to mar the view. Start down the Powder Puff Trail which is long but very gentle. At one point, as the slope turns, the steep main slopes will be in front of you. Follow this path back to the office and the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the clockwise route.)

skiplattekill_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Sonoma Fallsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagit 2.0 mi. 150 ft.

Finding this hidden gem is easy but just knowing it is there is HARD! I have lived in Livingston Manor and did not know how beautiful these falls were until a recent visit! The area recently changed hands and the new owners have opened a small store and will eventually have a cider press in operation. Behind the store is a series of falls with a rustic pathway along the stream to the top. Exit State Route 17 (The Quickway), soon to be I86 at exit 97 for Morsston. If you are heading west turn left off the exit and go back under the main road. Take a left and then your first right. Turn right at the next road and pass over a small bridge. The dead end road to the falls is the next left. For those traveling east, take a right off the exit and then take your next left. Follow the directions for those traveling west.

Sullivan County High Point: Quick Lake – Flynn Trailsnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithikerhalf_snagit 7.8 mi. 1316 ft. GPSies

schigh_map The area around Frick Pond, Hodge Pond and Quick Lake is covered with trails. There are numerous possibilities for short of long hikes. The area is “relatively” flat and there are no “views”. There is, however, some beautiful scenery. Take DeBruce Road from Livingston Manor for about six miles then turn left on Mongaup Rd. Where the road splits bear left on Beech Mountain Rd. and park in the parking lot on the left. Find the blue-blazed Flynn Trail and follow it for 1.7 miles to the junction with the yellow-blazed Big Rock Trail which goes to the left. Continue straight on The Flynn Trail for less than half a mile. Take the jeep trail that goes to the right as the Flynn Trail turns left toward Hodge Pond. Stay on this trail as it winds its way up the mountain for a little more than .5 miles. At this point the trail flattens out and then disappears. Strike off into the woods heading UP. Look for old jeep trails or herd paths to aid your ascent. Wander around at the top of this mountain until you think you have hit the high point. Much of the area seems to be the same elevation and there is no marker. This is informally called Beech Mountain and the highest point seems to be on the eastern part of the plateau. Head back down the mountain until you hit the jeep trail. From here you can retrace your steps back to the parking area. If you want to do a loop, take a right on the jeep trail about half way down which will take you to the outlet of Hodge Pond. Pick up the Flynn Trail and stay on it for a mile. Here the trail ends. Turn left on the red marked Quick Lake Trail. Stay on this trail for 3.1 miles and it will take you passed Frick Pond back to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

schigh_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Terrace Mountain (Woodland Valley)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.8 mi. 2070 ft. GPSies

terracemt_map Park at the Woodland Valley Campsites on Woodland Valley Road being sure to pay the parking fee during the season. Head across the road to the bridge that crosses the creek. Be ready for an immediate climb as you make your way up the trail to Wittenberg Mountain. Over the next 1.9 miles from the bridge you will gain almost 1400 feet before the trail begins to level off. Even after the trail is no longer climbing continuously there will be several ups and downs. At 2.5 miles you will be at the junction with the trail to Terrace Mountain and a lean-to to the left. The trail to Terrace Mountain starts out as a pleasant walk through some hardwoods on an open trail. At about 2.7 miles there is a path to the right of the trail. This path leads to a large open rock face which offers some nice views to the northwest. The shelf of rock is quite large and you can walk to the east to find a large stone fireplace and “chairs”. You may also walk along the edge of the rock face and get some more limited views which are better in the late fall or winter. After this path, the trail crosses some open rock and was poorly marked except for some cairns. The forest changes to evergreen trees as you descend. The rest of the walk to the lean-to is about .6 miles but drops over 200 feet. The forest changes back to hardwood until the trail enters a cleared area with the lean-to on the right. The lean-to is minimal but in good shape. The trail stops at the lean-to but once continued on to the Woodland Valley Road. When you are done exploring, retrace your route back to the Woodland valley parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

terracemt_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Ticetonyck Mountain (Peck Rd)new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 3.4 mi. 1350 ft. GPSies

ticetonyckmt_map From the intersection of Routes 28A and 28 near Boiceville drive south for .4 miles and turn left on DeSilva Road. Turn left at the end of the road and then turn right on Bostock Mountain Road. After 1.4 miles turn left on Peck Road. Drive 1.2 miles to a small pulloff on the left side of the road. The only sign is a small one in this “parking area” that explains the acquisition of Ticetenyck Mountain. The entire hike is a bushwhack although there are some woods roads and paths to follow. The first part of the hike is along a narrow access corridor of state land that is bordered by private property on both sides. Take the woods road that heads to the left and up a steep hill right out of parking area. Follow the state forest signs and the yellow blazes for about .5 miles and find a woods road that ascends steeply along the western shoulder of the mountain’s ridge. Watch for nice views of the Shokan Reservoir which are easier to get in season’s with fewer leaves. After about .75 miles you should be at the highest point on the road. The road continues northwest and start down onto private property. Turn off the road into the woods to the right and climb a steep hill. Continue to hike up and to the northeast until about 1.4 miles. Look for the highest point on the summit plateau and you may find the rock with the USGS benchmark. Walk down off the summit to the east or southeast and walk to the edge of the summit plateau. Walk counterclockwise until you find a viewpoint facing east. There will be wide open views and a large rock with many initials and symbols. Walk back to the summit and head west. The viewpoints on the west are mostly blocked by trees but are worth the visit. When you are done, follow your path back to your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

ticetonyckmt_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Tremper Mountain: Rt. 40, Phoenicianew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.1 mi. 2100 ft. GPSies

tremper_map The Tremper Mountain Fire Tower is believed to be the oldest of the reconstructed fire towers in The Catskills. It was originally constructed elsewhere in 1917 and then moved to its present location. The trail is mostly along an old road to the summit. It has many switchbacks which make the route Not as steep as it might be but also add length to the distance. Views of the surrounding mountains are easily has had from the fire tower. From Rt. 28 turn at the sign that indicates the village of Phoenicia. Continue straight through town until the sign for Rt. 40. Continue of Rt. 40 for about 3/4 of a mile. Pass the first parking area on your right. Park at the next parking area on the left. This area has a sign for the Tremper Mountain Fire Tower. Walk over three bridges and up a hill on the stone steps. Don’t be surprised at the lack of a trail register at this point. The register is a little over a quarter mile on the trail. From here follow the well-marked red Phoenicia trail to the tower. The trail is an old road to the tower. It has many switchbacks which makes the incline quiet easy but lengthens the hike. It is possible to cut some of the switchbacks or bushwhack the entire way. BE CAREFUL! There are reports of timber rattlesnakes in this area! The trail eventually reaches a plateau and after a short hike and a short climb you will be at the fire tower. This tower is surrounded by trees until you get near the top. The views are nice but not as interesting as the ones from Overlook, Balsam or Hunter on a nice day. Retrace your trail and you will be back at your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

tremper_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)

Trout and Around Mud Pondnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.9 mi. 1264 ft. GPSies

 

troutaroundmud_mapThis is one of our favorite trails when we just want to hike. It has several variations for distance and
difficulty. Like most trails, hiking one way is different than hiking in the other direction. We have
take this route more than a dozen times this season and it is interesting to watch the changing
seasons. It is unfortunate that Russell Brook Road is closed due to the frequent floods that have
washed out the road.

Turn left on Morton Hill Road on Route 206 just after the Rockland Flats. Bear right up Morton Hill
Road until you see a parking area on the left near the sign indicates Russell Brook Road is closed.
Park here on the side of the road and hike down Russell Brook Road .5 miles to the actual trail head. Go over the bridge and
look to your right to see a beautiful waterfall. Explore this area if you like. Back on the trail you
may go to the left or right. Go to the right and walk another 1.5 miles to the head of Trout Pond. The
trail is a gentle uphill all the way with the last quarter mile along the edge of the lake. At the
head of the lake the trail branches right to Campbell Brook. Bear left but do not go up the hill to the
lean-to since this is a dead end. The trail ascends around the other side of Trout Pond with a moderate
climb to almost 2500 feet on Cherry Ridge. You now walk down to Mud Pond. The total distance from the
lean-to is about 1.7 miles.

At this point you reach a T in the trail. Left goes directly back to the trailhead covering a little over 1 mile plus the half mile back to the car. Turning right takes you
around Mud Pond and to the lower trail head on Russell Brook Road. The distance is 2 miles to the lower trail head and another 1.7 miles back to the car. If you can make the distance around Mud Pond there are some interesting things to see. Several old stone foundations can be seen around Mud Pond. A beaver pond can be found on the backside of the pond but there isn’t much evidence of activity. As you hike from the lower trail head to the parking area, you can see the devastation the floods
have brought to the road. In several places it is hard to tell road from stream!

Turn right here and walk on the wide trail around Mud Pond. You can see the pond to your left most of the time. When the snowmobile trail splits off to the right be sure to stay left. At about .8 miles from the last trail junction watch for a trail or path that leads down to the pond. Walk over the dam and around the pond. This is a bushwhack and you may have to fight through some thick brush. As you circle the pond head northeast and you will intersect the woods road that leads back to the trail register near the start of the hike. Depending on where you intersect the trail it is about .9 miles. From the trail register retrace your route up Russell Brook Road to your car

(The map above shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)
troutaroundmud_pro(The image at the left shows the profile of the hike.)



Trout and Mud Pond: Bushwhack Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.8 mi. 1520 ft. GPSies

troutmudbushwhack_map This is one of our favorite trails when we just want to hike. It has several variations for distance and difficulty. Like most trails, hiking one way is different than hiking in the other direction. We have take this route more than a dozen times this season and it is interesting to watch the changing seasons. It is unfortunate that Russell Brook Road is closed due to the frequent floods that have washed out the road. Turn left on Morton Hill Road on Route 206 just after the Rockland flats. Bear right up Morton Hill Road until you see a parking area on the left near the sign indicates Russell Brook Road is closed. Park here and hike down Russell Brook Road .25 miles to the first camping area on the left. Across from he camping area is a gated trail. What is now a snowmobile trail probably follows one of the haul roads built by the Treyz Acid Wood Factory in the early 20th century. This trail is overgrown and in need of maintenance and am not sure it has seen a snowmobile in some time! From the time you get on the trail it ascends for about 1.2 miles to the top of a ridge. For the next .8 miles the trail goes through some switchbacks in a descent west to the trail around Trout Pond. When you intersect the trail turn right and walk a short distance to the lean-tos and the inlet end of the pond. Here the trail branches right to Campbell Brook. Bear left but do not go up the hill to the lean-to since this is a dead end. The trail ascends around the other side of Trout Pond with a moderate climb to almost 2500 feet on Cherry Ridge at 3 miles into the hike. You now walk down the other side to Mud Pond. At this point you reach a T in the trail as the hiking trail meets a snowmobile trail. Turn right and look for a path down to the shores of Mud Pond. This infrequently visited location has lots of wildlife in and around the pond. Between the shore of the pond and the woods road that serves as hiking and snowmobile trail, there are the ruins of several buildings. Walk back up to the woods road and turn right to get started back to your car. Over the next mile the trail ascends briefly and then drops to the lowest point as you cross the bridge over the outlet to Trout Pond. Turn right at the next trail junction and head out to Russell Brook Road and the lower trailhead parking. As you cross the bridge, look to your left to see Russell Brook Falls. The falls has historical significance so walk over to it if you have the time. It is usually possible to get down into the stream bed and take pictures of the falls without a problem. The stonework is part of two dams used to regulate water flow to an electric generating waterwheel downstream near what is now the Russell Brook Campsite. Once on the road you have an additional .5 miles back up Russell Brook Road to your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)
troutmudbushwhack_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike.)


Trout Pond: Complete Trout and Mud Pond Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.6 mi. 1317 ft. GPSies

trout_map This is one of our favorite trails when we just want to hike. It has several variations for distance and difficulty. Like most trails, hiking one way is different than hiking in the other direction. We have take this route more than a dozen times this season and it is interesting to watch the changing seasons. It is unfortunate that Russell Brook Road is closed due to the frequent floods that have washed out the road. Turn left on Morton Hill Road on Route 206 just after the Rockland flats. Bear right up Morton Hill Road until you see a parking area on the left near the sign indicates Russell Brook Road is closed.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

Park here and hike down Russell Brook Road .5 miles to the actual trail head. Go over the bridge and look to your right to see a beautiful waterfall. Explore this area if you like. Back on the trail you may go to the left or right. Go to the right and walk another 1.5 miles to the head of Trout Pond. The trail is a gentle uphill all the way with the last quarter mile along the edge of the lake. At the head of the lake the trail branches right to Campbell Brook. Bear left but do not go up the hill to the lean-to since this is a dead end. The trail ascends around the other side of Trout Pond with a moderate climb to almost 2500 feet on Cherry Ridge. You now walk down to Mud Pond. The total distance from the lean-to is about 1.7 miles. At this point you reach a T in the trail as the hiking trail meets a snowmobile trail. Left goes directly back to the trailhead covering a little over 1 mile plus the half mile back to the car. Turn right to start around Mud Pond. The trail follows the shore of Mud Pond until at 4 miles it turns almost 90 degrees to the south. A snowmobile trail continues straight ahead. This section of the trail can be very wet even when there has been no rain for some time. The trail now follows a stream out of Mud Pond and begins a long and sometimes steep descent of 530 feet over 1.1 miles. At one point you will pass by a beaver pond which often has interesting species of wildlife in and around it. The trail meets Russell Brook Road where you should turn left to walk up the road or what is left of it! In a few hundred feet is the toughest obstacle. You must cross Russell Brook at this point. You may be able to shimmy across a log, tiptoe across stepping stones or just get your feet wet. On the other side there is usually enough road left to walk along it in most places. You should be prepared to wade again or walk up a steep bank to get back to the lower parking area. The total walk up from the “ford” is 1.5 miles plus an additional .5 miles back up Russell Brook Road to your car.

trout_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike.)


Trout and Mud Pond: Cooks Falls Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 10.9 mi. 1872 ft. GPSies

troutcooks_map This is one of our favorite trails when we just want to hike. It has several variations for distance and difficulty. Like most trails, hiking one way is different than hiking in the other direction. We have take this route more than a dozen times this season and it is interesting to watch the changing seasons. It is unfortunate that Russell Brook Road is closed due to the frequent floods that have washed out the road. Take route 17, the Quickway, to the Cooks Falls exit. Get off at the exit and turn right onto Russell Brook Road. Drive passed the Russell Brook Campsites to the small parking lot at the end of the road. The road ends here and your hike begins. Just passed the STOP sign and pile of dirt that signal the end of the road, the road drops away and Russell Brook starts. The brook has eroded the road and is too wide to cross unless it has been VERY dry. If you look ahead, you may be able to see where the road is still intact and from that point on it may be in good shape. The only way to get to that point is to bushwhack and the easiest route is up the hill on the right side of the parking area. Go up the bank and walk along the bank wherever you can find flatter area to avoid sidehilling the whole way. Find a place to descend where you have to cross as little water as possible, If you are fortunate, you will find the road in good condition for some time with parts of the stream on either side or to one side or the other. At one point there is a bridge which seems to be a culvert with metal guard rails. You may also the old foundations from the Hans Bruning Dye Works which produced much of the khaki dye for World War I uniforms. As you continue your hike you may have to negotiate several stream crossings and walk over large stones left from the stream erosion. Numerous blowdowns also may also force us to change directions. At 1.4 miles the trail heads up to the left toward Mud Pond. Turn left here. The trail to Mud Pond is about 2 miles long with the first mile climbing rather steadily. After this, the trail levels some. At about 3 miles the trail turns sharply east while a snowmobile trail heads north. Stay on the trail as it wraps around Mud Pond to the junction with the trail to Trout Pond at 3.5 miles. Turn left to go to Trout Pond. The trail to Trout Pond ascends to near the top of Cherry Ridge over the next 1.2 miles. After the climb to Cherry Ridge, the next .7 miles of trail descends to the inlet end of Trout Pond. Follow the trail around the shores of Trout Pond to the outlet end and the dam at 5.9 miles. The trail now starts to descend to the area of Russell Brook Falls and loses about 250 feet over the next .75 miles. At the trail junction turn right to start your loop back to Mud Pond. You will cross a bridge and pass by a popular campsite of questionable legality. The trail immediately begins to climb and gains 360 feet over .65 miles. From here the trail descends to the Mud Pond trail junction where you will start your trip back along the same path you used to get there. At 9.5 miles you should be back at Russell Brook and Russell Brook Road. Walk back to your car along this path.

(The map at above shows the parking area and the lollipop hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

troutcooks_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Trout Pond: Bushwhack Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 4.2 mi. 782 ft. GPSies

troutaround_map This is one of our favorite trails when we just want to hike. It has several variations for distance and difficulty. Like most trails, hiking one way is different than hiking in the other direction. We have take this route more than a dozen times this season and it is interesting to watch the changing seasons. It is unfortunate that Russell Brook Road is closed due to the frequent floods that have washed out the road. Turn left on Morton Hill Road on Route 206 just after the Rockland flats. Bear right up Morton Hill Road until you see a parking area on the left near the sign indicates Russell Brook Road is closed. Park here and hike down Russell Brook Road .5 miles to the actual trail head. Go over the bridge and look to your right to see a beautiful waterfall. Explore this historical area if you like. Back on the trail you may go to the left or right. Go to the right and walk another 1.5 miles to the head of Trout Pond. The trail is a gentle uphill all the way with the last quarter mile along the edge of the lake. Along the way you may want to stop at the dam at the outlet end of the pond. There are some nice views this end depending on the light. At the head of the lake the trail branches right to Campbell Brook. Bear left on a short spur trail up the hill to the lean-to. This section of trail dead ends here so now you must begin to bushwhack. The easiest route from a navigational standpoint is to stay near the shore of the pond. As you walk around the pond you may encounter some dense laurel stands and some old campsites and fir rings. Eventually you will some to the far side of the dam. Cross the dam here being careful not to slip as you walk across the spillway! Walk out to the trail and turn right to walk back down to the area of the falls. As you come to the bridge across Russell Brook, look to your left to see Russell Brook Falls. The falls has historical significance so walk over to it if you have the time. It is usually possible to get down into the stream bed and take pictures of the falls without a problem. The stonework is part of two dams used to regulate water flow to an electric generating waterwheel downstream near what is now the Russell Brook Campsite. Walk back to the trail and out to the lower trailhead. Once on the road you have an additional .5 miles back up Russell Brook Road to your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)
troutaround_pro
(The image shows the profile of the hike.)


Trout Pond: Campbell Brook and Morton Hill Road Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.1 mi. 1237 ft. GPSies

troutmorton_map This is one of our favorite trails when we just want to hike. It has several variations for distance and difficulty. Like most trails, hiking one way is different than hiking in the other direction. We have take this route more than a dozen times this season and it is interesting to watch the changing seasons. It is unfortunate that Russell Brook Road is closed due to the frequent floods that have washed out the road. Turn left on Morton Hill Road on Route 206 just after the Rockland flats. Bear right up Morton Hill Road until you see a parking area on the left near the sign indicates Russell Brook Road is closed.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

Park here and hike down Russell Brook Road .5 miles to the actual trail head. Go over the bridge and look to your right to see a beautiful waterfall. Explore this area if you like. Back on the trail you may go to the left or right. Go to the right and walk another 1.5 miles to the head of Trout Pond. The trail is a gentle uphill all the way with the last quarter mile along the edge of the lake. At the head of the lake the trail branches right to Campbell Brook. Turn right to stay on the Trout Pond Trail. The first .8 miles of this part of the trail is all uphill and rises about 450 feet to the top of a hill. The trail is not used much and would be completely grow in except for the fact that it also acts as a snowmobile trail. At one point, near the top, another snowmobile trail marked “21” heads off to the right. Stayed to left on the blue blazed hiking trail. From here the trail descends to an area where it crosses two brooks on bridges. After that, it ascends slightly to meet Campbell Brook Road. At Campbell Brook Road turn right on Campbell Brook Road. Walk the road until it meets Morton Hill Road. For about .9 miles Campbell Brook Road and Morton Hill Road ascend a hill. After that, the next 2.4 miles is all downhill back to your car.

troutmorton_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Trout Pond: Campbell Brook and Morton Hill Road Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 8.5 mi. 1710 ft. GPSies

troutmortonlong_map This is one of our favorite trails when we just want to hike. It has several variations for distance and difficulty. Like most trails, hiking one way is different than hiking in the other direction. We have take this route more than a dozen times this season and it is interesting to watch the changing seasons. It is unfortunate that Russell Brook Road is closed due to the frequent floods that have washed out the road. Turn left on Morton Hill Road on Route 206 just after the Rockland flats. Bear right up Morton Hill Road until you see a parking area on the left. Turn left and drive down Russell Brook Road to the lower parking area. If Russell Brook Road is closed, be sure to park on the side of the road at the intersection of Morton Hill Road and Russell Brook Road as the parking spot there is on private land.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

Park and hike down the woods road to the bridge over Russell Brook. Go over the bridge and look to your right to see a beautiful waterfall. Explore this area if you like. Back on the trail you may go to the left or right. Go to the left and walk up a hill gaining about 400 feet in .8 miles. At the top of the hill descend slightly to a trail junction. Turn right on the blue blazed Mud Pond Trail and hike a mile to the highest point on the hike on the shoulder of Cherry Ridge. Descend .8 miles from this high point to the bridge at the inlet end of Trout Pond. There are two lean-tos in this area which are popular places to camp. As the trail begins to turn to the right around the pond, turn left on the Campbell Brook Trail. You will now hike .8 miles and 430 vertical feet up and the same amount down over a small ridge. At 4.75 miles you will emerge on Campbell Brook Road. Turn right and hike a mile to the intersection with Moron Hill Road. Continue straight ahead on Morton Hill Road and up a small Hill. From the top of the hill walk 2.3 miles north on the road back to the junction with Russell Brook Road. You will lose almost 500 feet along the way. Turn right on Russell Brook Road and hike .5 miles back to the car.

troutmortonlong_pro

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Trout Pond: Campbell Mountain and Morton Hill Road Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 8.9 mi. 1679 ft. GPSies

troutcampbellshort_map This is one of our favorite trails when we just want to hike. It has several variations for distance and difficulty. Like most trails, hiking one way is different than hiking in the other direction. We have take this route more than a dozen times this season and it is interesting to watch the changing seasons. It is unfortunate that Russell Brook Road is closed due to the frequent floods that have washed out the road. Turn left on Morton Hill Road on Route 206 just after the Rockland flats. Bear right up Morton Hill Road until you see a parking area on the left near the sign indicates Russell Brook Road is closed.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

Park here and hike down Russell Brook Road .5 miles to the actual trail head. Go over the bridge and look to your right to see a beautiful waterfall. Explore this area if you like. Back on the trail you may go to the left or right. Go to the right and walk another 1.5 miles to the head of Trout Pond. The trail is a gentle uphill all the way with the last quarter mile along the edge of the lake. At the head of the lake the trail branches right to Campbell Brook. Turn right to stay on the Trout Pond Trail. The first .8 miles of this part of the trail is all uphill and rises about 450 feet to the top of a hill. The trail is not used much and would be completely grow in except for the fact that it also acts as a snowmobile trail. At one point, near the top, another snowmobile trail marked “21” heads off to the right. Stayed to left on the blue blazed hiking trail. From here the trail descends to an area where it crosses two brooks on bridges. After that, it ascends slightly to meet Campbell Brook Road at about 3.5 miles into your hike. Cross Campbell Brook Road to stay on the Trout Pond Trail. Over the next.6 miles the trail ascends a hill and then for the next.85 miles it descends until you arrive at Campbell Mountain Road about 5.2 miles into your hike. Turn right on the road and walk 1.1 miles to Campbell Brook Road. Turn left and walk .4 miles to Morton Hill Road where you turn right. After that, walk 2.3 miles downhill back to your car.

troutcampbellshort_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Trout Pond: Clockwise Loop from Morton Hill Roadnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.0 mi. 1237 ft. GPSies

Trout Pond (clockwise)_map This is one of our favorite trails when we just want to hike. It has several variations for distance and difficulty. Like most trails, hiking one way is different than hiking in the other direction. We have take this route more than a dozen times this season and it is interesting to watch the changing seasons. It is unfortunate that Russell Brook Road is closed due to the frequent floods that have washed out the road. Turn left on Morton Hill Road on Route 206 just after the Rockland Flats. Bear right up Morton Hill Road until you see a parking area on the left near the sign indicates Russell Brook Road is closed.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a clockwise direction.)

Park here and hike down Russell Brook Road .5 miles to the actual trail head. Go over the bridge and look to your right to see a beautiful waterfall. Explore this area if you like. Back on the trail you may go to the left or right. Go to the left and start to walk up a rather steep hill toward Mud Pond. After about 2 miles you will be at a trail junction. You may walk straight ahead and then turn left into the woods and walk down to the shore of Mud Pond. Turn right onto the trail that heads over the shoulder of Cherry Ridge to Trout Pond (Cable’s Lake). At about 3 miles you will be at the highest point on the hike from which the trail drops down to the lake. At 3.9 miles there is a bridge across the inlet stream for the pond. A trail up and to the right leads to a lean-to while another lean-to is a hundred feet ahead on the left. Continue around the pond on the wide, flat woods road until you get to the outlet end of the lake. From here the trail continues to the trail junction near the false where you started your loop. Retrace your route back to the car

Trout Pond (clockwise)_pro

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Trout Pond: Counterclockwise Loop from Morton Hill Roadnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.1 mi. 1031 ft. GPSies

troutloop_map This is one of our favorite trails when we just want to hike. It has several variations for distance and difficulty. Like most trails, hiking one way is different than hiking in the other direction. We have take this route more than a dozen times this season and it is interesting to watch the changing seasons. It is unfortunate that Russell Brook Road is closed due to the frequent floods that have washed out the road. Turn left on Morton Hill Road on Route 206 just after the Rockland Flats. Bear right up Morton Hill Road until you see a parking area on the left near the sign indicates Russell Brook Road is closed.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

Park here and hike down Russell Brook Road .5 miles to the actual trail head. Go over the bridge and look to your right to see a beautiful waterfall. Explore this area if you like. Back on the trail you may go to the left or right. Go to the right and walk another 1.5 miles to the head of Trout Pond. The trail is a gentle uphill all the way with the last quarter mile along the edge of the lake. At the head of the lake the trail branches right to Campbell Brook. Bear left but do not go up the hill to the lean-to since this is a dead end. The trail ascends around the other side of Trout Pond with a moderate climb to almost 2500 feet on Cherry Ridge. You now walk down to Mud Pond. The total distance from the lean-to is about 1.7 miles. At this point you reach a T in the trail. Left goes directly back to the trailhead covering a little over 1 mile plus the half mile back to the car. Turning right takes you around Mud Pond and to the lower trail head on Russell Brook Road. The distance is 2 miles to the lower trail head and another 1.7 miles back to the car. If you can make the distance around Mud Pond there are some interesting things to see. Several old stone foundations can be seen around Mud Pond. A beaver pond can be found on the backside of the pond but there isn’t much evidence of activity. As you hike from the lower trail head to the parking area, you can see the devastation the floods have brought to the road. In several places it is hard to tell road from stream!

troutloop_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Trout Pond: Morton Hill to Route 206 Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 12.4 mi. 2406 ft. GPSies

troutcampbell_map This is one of our favorite trails when we just want to hike. It has several variations for distance and difficulty. Like most trails, hiking one way is different than hiking in the other direction. We have take this route more than a dozen times this season and it is interesting to watch the changing seasons. It is unfortunate that Russell Brook Road is closed due to the frequent floods that have washed out the road. Turn left on Morton Hill Road on Route 206 just after the Rockland flats. Bear right up Morton Hill Road until you see a parking area on the left near the sign indicates Russell Brook Road is closed.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route in a counterclockwise direction.)

Park here and hike down Russell Brook Road .5 miles to the actual trail head. Go over the bridge and look to your right to see a beautiful waterfall. Explore this area if you like. Back on the trail you may go to the left or right. Go to the right and walk another 1.5 miles to the head of Trout Pond. The trail is a gentle uphill all the way with the last quarter mile along the edge of the lake. At the head of the lake the trail branches right to Campbell Brook. Turn right to stay on the Trout Pond Trail. The first .8 miles of this part of the trail is all uphill and rises about 450 feet to the top of a hill. The trail is not used much and would be completely grow in except for the fact that it also acts as a snowmobile trail. At one point, near the top, another snowmobile trail marked “21” heads off to the right. Stayed to left on the blue blazed hiking trail. From here the trail descends to an area where it crosses two brooks on bridges. After that, it ascends slightly to meet Campbell Brook Road at about 3.5 miles into your hike. Cross Campbell Brook Road to stay on the Trout Pond Trail. Over the next.6 miles the trail ascends a hill and then for the next.85 miles it descends until you arrive at Campbell Mountain Road about 5.2 miles into your hike. Cross Campbell Mountain Road and pick up the blue Campbell Mountain Trail. Walk 2 miles up and over Campbell Mountain and then down the other side. The descent has several switchbacks, a lean-to along the way and several water crossings on bridges. When you arrive at Route 206, turn right and walk .7 miles up the hill to Jug Tavern Road. Turn right here and walk 1.5 miles to Campbell Mountain Road. Turn left and walk .4 miles to Campbell Brook Road. Turn left and walk .4 miles to Morton Hill Road where you turn right. After that, walk 2.3 miles downhill back to your car.

troutcampbell_pro

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Tunis and Vly Ponds from Quaker Clearingnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.4 mi. 880 ft. GPSies

tunispond_map These two small ponds require a bushwhack off the Hardenburgh-Neversink Trail but are well worth the effort. Park in the Balsam Lake parking area at the end of the Beaverkill Road. The beginning of the trail starts in the upper right corner of the parking area. It passes through a field of ferns and is pretty overgrown but there are some nice views of Balsam Lake Mountain. The register is placed just at the end of the field as the forest begins. Once in the woods, the trail is wide and easy to hike. It descends for about .5 miles to Black Brook and crosses on a bridge. A brief ascent and another descent brings you to the bridge across the Gulf of Mexico Brook at 1.1 miles. A very brief ascent and descent leads to Vly Brook which you can usually step across. At this point Vly Pond is less than .25 miles away. Head out along the creek and until you came to signs of beaver activity. Walk to the edge of the pond where you may be able to walk across the dam if you so desire. Walking around the pond anticlockwise means pushing through some thick balsam and walking over some slick rocks. The reward is a nice view with a few high rocks to stand on. Behind the pond are Balsam Lake and Graham Mountains. Head back out to the main trail and turn left to continue to Tunis Pond. From Vly Pond another ascent and descent brings you to a well-used woods road at 2.0 miles. The trail turns left onto the road and starts to follow the Beaverkill. After walking along the road for about .5 miles, choose a spot to head off into the woods since the road/trail does not lead directly to Tunis Pond. The woods aren’t too think and it is only about .25 miles to get to the pond. The walk is uphill since Tunis Pond is said to be the highest named pond in the Catskills! The pond is beautiful and seldom visited. You may walk along the shore in either direction but be prepared for wet, swampy conditions. Toward the lower end of the pond there may be a large beaver house near the middle of the pond. When you are done, head up into the woods and away from the pond. Within only a few minutes and about .3 miles you should be back on the road. Turn right and retrace your route to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

tunispond_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)
Tunis Pond From Black Bear Roadnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.1 mi. 650 ft. GPSies

tunispondbb_map This small pond requires a bushwhack off the Hardenburgh-Neversink Trail but is well worth the effort. It is one of the highest bodies of water in the Catskills. This route is an out and back starting at the end of Black Bear Road. The trail has been eroded in places by streams and crossing can be interesting during periods of higher water. Park at the end of Black Bear Road (Wild Meadow Road) in the snowplow turnaround ass long as there is no snow! Walk down the road which serves as the beginning of the yellow Neversink Hardenburgh Trail in this area. Walk by the hunting camp and continue on the trail on the other side. The trail can be very wet in places. Cross over a brook and head up a little gaining some elevation. The Fall Brook lean-to is about 1.7 miles into the hike. After passing the lean-to, a swampy area appeared on the right of the trail which leads into a series of beaver ponds and beaver meadows. Doubletop Mountain is in the background. This area is the headwaters of Fall Brook which runs south and the Beaverkill which runs north and west. The trail parallels the Beaverkill for a short distance and then ENDS at the edge of the stream. You should be able to pick up the yellow trail markers ahead. The stream has simply eroded away the trail so you will have to find your own way around by bushwhacking up the bank and then back down to the trail. When you reach the point where the trail crosses the stream, you will find no bridge to safely cross. There is one slightly further downstream but it appears to be on private property. You can cross here by wading, rock hopping or looking for a convenient log bridge. Once across pick up the trail on the other side. It is very narrow in several places as it clings to the bank of the stream and in at least one place all but disappears. Only a short distance from the crossing, the trail opens into a little clearing and a very nice bridge cross the stream! Continue down the woods road until you are near Tunis Pond which is on the right side of the trail. You cannot see the pond from the trail so use you navigational and maps skills to plan a short bushwhack. Head to the right of the trail through the woods and climb a little hill to get to Tunis Pond. The climb can be steep but it is short. When you arrive on the shore of the pond you may want to take pictures of this beautiful and secluded place. Walk along the shore in either direction. When you can tear yourself away, head almost directly south and down the hill which is a direct line to the main trail. Turn left on the main trail and retrace your route to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

tunispondbb_pro

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Tusten Mountain Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 3.1 mi. 640 ft. GPSies

tustenloop_map Crawford Road leads to the trailhead and is located 10 miles north of Barryville and 5 miles south or Narrowsburg on State Route 97. Turn onto Crawford Road to head toward the Delaware River. Just down the hill watch for the sign board on the right. Park here to begin your hike. Walk parallel to the river on Tusten Road which is only open to vehicle traffic from April to December. In about .2 miles you will cross a stone arch bridge. Follow the red TMR (Ten Mile River) and yellow (Scouting symbol) blazes along Tusten Road until a sign points to the trail that begins on the right at about .7 miles. Along the way you will notice a lean-to and tent camping area. There is also a quarry, the first of many, on the right side of the road. As soon as you turn into the woods you will find the register box fro the trail. You will have to make a choice of turning left or continuing straight ahead. The trail to the left is somewhat steeper but neither is too really hard. Turn left at the register box and hike to about 1.1 miles. You will gain most of your elevation to this point. Watch for another quarry on the left in the woods as the trail start to level. At about 1.2 miles you should come across a sign that points to the lookout which is just ahead after a short climb. From the lookout you can see the Delaware River in the distance. Continue on the trail and down the other side of the hill. There will be various mall quarries along the way. At about 1.4 miles there will be a large pile of stone on the left from a quarry further up the hill. At the base of a short descent will be another quarry on the right. Here you will again have to choose the steeper trail to the right or the more gradual trail to the left. Turn left and the trail will continue north briefly and then make a 180 degree turn to the south to head back to the trailhead. Along the way you will notice DEC signs that mark the area on the right as “Restricted”. At about 2 miles the “”steep” trail will come in from the right. You can follow this trail to the right as it will take you to the largest quarry on the trail. Continue on the main trail back to the register box at 2.5 miles. Turn left and walk south along Tusten road for .6 miles to get back to the parking area.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

tustenloop_pro

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Van Wyck Lower Crashnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 3.5 mi 1280 ft GPSies

vanwycklower_map Park at the parking lot for Peekamoose and walk towards Sundown to Bear Hole Brook to begin your bushwhack. As you walk up the bank you will find a woods road that heads generally northeast and then due north. This IS a bushwhack and your route could vary greatly but it is usually easier to hike a road or trail even if it is not the most direct route. After about .8 miles head northwest for another .7 miles. To locate the crash you will have to wander around a lot in the area or use the GPS coordinates to find it. The crash is a Korean War era jet. These planes were basically an aluminum tube wrapped around an engine. the Front part of the fuselage is destroyed but the rear is in pretty good shape. The “stars and bars” marking is still evident. The wings sheared off as the plane hit the trees and can be found a distance from the main wreck. When you are finished, you can look for the upper crash of a civilian Cessna or return to your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the out-and-back hiking route.)
vanwycklower_pro
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Vernooy Kill Falls: From Cherrytown Roadnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 3.4 mi 800 ft GPSies

vernooykill_map From Route 209 near Kerhonkson, turn onto Ulster County 3. After 1.3 miles turn left onto Cherrytown Road. Drive about 3.5 miles and turn left onto Upper Cherrytown Road. Once on Upper Cherrytown, go 3.1 miles until you see the state trail head sign on the right. Park and walk across the road to get on the trail. The trail is marked with blue blazes, snowmobile markers and the occasional aqua blazes of the Long Path. Walk 1.8 miles on this trail until you are at the bridge at the base of the falls. The falls are more of a set of rapids and cataracts than one continuous drop of water. Walk upstream on either side to take in all the beauty of the the various “steps” to the falls. There is no formal trail but you will have no trouble finding your way. Near the bridge are the ruins of a mill built by the Vernooy family that first owned the land. Standing on the rocks in the middle of the stream offers a great view of the bridge and many of the different steps to the falls. It also offers a good opportunity to fall in so be careful. After exploring, return to your car the same way you came.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route as an out-and-back.)

vernooykill_pro

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Vernooy Kill Falls: From Peekamoosenew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 9.5 mi 1695 ft GPSies

longpathvernooy_map Turn onto Route 52A near the TriValley School. Stay on the road until the hamlet of Sundown where the road turns left. Bear to the left on Peekamoose Rd. and continue on the road until parking areas begin to show up on the left. Watch for a brown and yellow sign on the right for the Long Path toward Cherrytown Road. There is a small parking area opposite the start of this trail. The next parking area on the left is the Upper Peekamoose Parking Area and is much larger. Of course, you may also reach this area by turning onto Peekamoose Road off Route 28A, the road that runs along the south side of the Ashokan Reservoir. Once you are on the trail there is a climb of over 1100 feet in the first mile to the top of Bangle Hill. As you walk up the trail look over your left shoulder for a view of Peekamoose Mountain. There is a small set of ledges near the top of Bangle hill but they are VERY small. From the top of Bangle Hill the trail turns east and descends for some distance until ascending to the highest point just south of Samson Mountain after about 2.4 miles. Turning north hear there is a short, about .6 mile, bushwhack to the top of Samson Mountain. The trail continues to descend and opens up to a wide woods road. At mile 3.2 the trail turns heard to the right off the road. If you continue ahead on the woods road, there is a small stone shed and evidence of other foundations and stone walls. The trail continues to descends through spruce and hardwood groves until it meets Spencer Road at 3.5 miles. Turn left on the road and walk about 1.3 miles east and northeast until mile 4.8. The trail markers are few and far between but do NOT worry about missing the turn to the right back into the woods and off the road. The trail is well marked but the walk along the road seems long. The trail turns almost due south and descends some until a slight climb to the top of Popel Hill at mile 6.0. Watch for a “witness sign” to your right and a USGS marker apparently in the middle of nowhere. From here the trail turns a little to the southeast before continue south to the falls at mile 7.2. The falls are more of a set of rapids and cataracts than one continuous drop of water. Walk upstream on either side to take in all the beauty of the the various “steps” to the falls. There is no formal trail but you will have no trouble finding your way. Near the bridge are the ruins of a mill built by the Vernooy family that first owned the land. Standing on the rocks in the middle of the stream offers a great view of the bridge and many of the different steps to the falls. It also offers a good opportunity to fall in so be careful. After exploring the area of the falls, get back on the trail. You may now hike the 7 miles back to your car or hike out to Cherrytown Road where you had the foresight to park another car for the shuttle. From the falls the trail heads east and then southeast but always descends until you reach the parking area at about mile 9.0.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route as an out-and-back.)

longpathvernooy_pro

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Walnut Mt Park: 3 Tiersnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagit 4.1 mi 750 ft GPSies

Walnut Mt (3 Tiers)_map Take Route 55 out of Liberty south toward Swan Lake. The road will make a sweeping left turn near the Achieve Nursing Home. Watch for Walnut Mt Road on the right about .6 miles after this sweeping left turn. Turn right onto the road and drive to the end to park. If the gates or closed or you may be hiking after the gates will be closed, park in one of the two areas just outside the gates. During the spring, summer and fall there may be trail amps at the building by the baseball field. You may also obtain maps from Town of Liberty Parks and Recreation on Many Street in Liberty. Walk up the road between the playground and picnic area toward the water tower. Turn right onto the red A1 trail that heads right and up into the woods. Continue on this trail until the junction with the green A4 and follow the A4 by bearing left. At the junction with the red A1 trail turn bear left to follow the red A1 trail. When the red A1 trail branches, turn right as it heads west and north. The red A1 trail eventually turns east and arrives back at the junction with the green A4. You will have completed the lower loop around the mountain and hikes about 1.7 miles. Continue around the mountain again on the green A4 trail by turning right. This time when you arrive at the junction with the A1 trail stay to the right to follow the A4 south until it makes and almost 180 degree turn to head around the mountain. Continue to follow the A4 north and then east as it starts to swing around the summit. On the north side turn right on a bike path as you start to walk down a hill. This will take you toward the summit and a path around the summit plateau. As you approach the rock ledges, look for a path that winds around the summit plateau. Turn right to follow the path in a counterclockwise direction. On the east side of the mountain a bike trail leads up to the summit plateau. It is marked by a sign warning riders that it is an expert trail. Walk up to the summit plateau and turn right to make a counterclockwise loop. You will find a well-constructed “bridge” over a jumble of rocks. The path continues around the edge of the summit until it leads back to the east side where you came up. Walk back down to the white A5 trail and turn right and descended to the green A4 trail. Turn left on the A4 and then right on the A1 which will bring you back to the open field where the A1 splits. Head left on the A1 and back down toward the car. You may want to walk around the filed below the baseball diamond. Walnut Mountain is the site of a Civil War reenactment every summer and you can see some of the split trail fences and gun emplacements.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route as a loop.)

Walnut Mt (3 Tiers)_pro

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Walnut Mt Park: Main Parkingnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 3.8 mi 600 ft GPSies

Walnut Mt (Main Parking)_map Walnut Mountain Park is owned and maintained by the Town of Liberty in Sullivan County, NY. It has ball fields, picnic areas and a network of hiking and mountain biking trails. Maps Amy be available at the park or from PArks and Recreation in the Village of Liberty near the Liberty Elementary School on Main St. To get to the main parking area head south from Liberty on Route 55 toward Swan Lake. Watch for the signs for the park on the right. Turn in and drive to the main parking area. To describe a particular route is probably useless since you can pick your own. The hiking trails are labeled A1 to A5 and are crossed by numerous bike trails marked with colored ribbons. The red A1 trail starts at the main parking area, goes up the hill passed the water tank and then encircles the base of the mountain. The green A4 trail branches from the the A1 on the south side of the mountain and circles the summit before leading you up to a spot near the summit. There are paths that head over the summit but there is no view and the summit is a scratchy pricker path. The white A5 trail also forms part of the loop around the summit. You can use the handy bike trails to get between areas also. The orange A2 trail branches from the A1 trail not too far from the parking area and eventually leads to the West Lake Street parking area. The trail makes a 90 degrees right turn along the way which is not well marked. The A2 trail comes back up from that parking area to a spot just below the baseball field. The yellow A3 trail starts at the north end of the main parking area and connects to the A2 trail. You can use any combination of trails to create a longer or shorter hike.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route as a loop.)

Walnut Mt (Main Parking)_pro

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Walnut Mt Park: Trail 3new-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 4.1 mi 715 ft GPSies

Walnut Mt (Trail 3)_map Walnut Mountain Park is owned and maintained by the Town of Liberty in Sullivan County, NY. It has ball fields, picnic areas and a network of hiking and mountain biking trails. Maps Amy be available at the park or from PArks and Recreation in the Village of Liberty near the Liberty Elementary School on Main St. To get to the main parking area head south from Liberty on Route 55 toward Swan Lake. Watch for the signs for the park on the right. Turn in and drive to the main parking area. To describe a particular route is probably useless since you can pick your own. The hiking trails are labeled A1 to A5 and are crossed by numerous bike trails marked with colored ribbons. The red A1 trail starts at the main parking area, goes up the hill passed the water tank and then encircles the base of the mountain. The green A4 trail branches from the the A1 on the south side of the mountain and circles the summit before leading you up to a spot near the summit. There are paths that head over the summit but there is no view and the summit is a scratchy pricker path. The white A5 trail also forms part of the loop around the summit. You can use the handy bike trails to get between areas also. The orange A2 trail branches from the A1 trail not too far from the parking area and eventually leads to the West Lake Street parking area. The trail makes a 90 degrees right turn along the way which is not well marked. The A2 trail comes back up from that parking area to a spot just below the baseball field. The yellow A3 trail starts at the north end of the main parking area and connects to the A2 trail. You can use any combination of trails to create a longer or shorter hike.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route as a loop.)

Walnut Mt (Trail 3)_pro

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Walnut Mt Park: West Lake Street Parkingnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagit 4.4 mi 790 ft GPSies

Walnut Mt (West Lake)_map Walnut Mountain Park is owned and maintained by the Town of Liberty in Sullivan County, NY. It has ball fields, picnic areas and a network of hiking and mountain biking trails. Maps Amy be available at the park or from PArks and Recreation in the Village of Liberty near the Liberty Elementary School on Main St. To get to the main parking area head south from Liberty on Route 55 toward Swan Lake. Watch for the signs for the park on the right. Turn in and drive to the main parking area. To describe a particular route is probably useless since you can pick your own. The hiking trails are labeled A1 to A5 and are crossed by numerous bike trails marked with colored ribbons. The red A1 trail starts at the main parking area, goes up the hill passed the water tank and then encircles the base of the mountain. The green A4 trail branches from the the A1 on the south side of the mountain and circles the summit before leading you up to a spot near the summit. There are paths that head over the summit but there is no view and the summit is a scratchy pricker path. The white A5 trail also forms part of the loop around the summit. You can use the handy bike trails to get between areas also. The orange A2 trail branches from the A1 trail not too far from the parking area and eventually leads to the West Lake Street parking area. The trail makes a 90 degrees right turn along the way which is not well marked. The A2 trail comes back up from that parking area to a spot just below the baseball field. The yellow A3 trail starts at the north end of the main parking area and connects to the A2 trail. You can use any combination of trails to create a longer or shorter hike.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route as a loop.)

Walnut Mt (West Lake)_pro

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Willow Trail to Mount Trempernew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 9.5 mi 2310 ft GPSies

willowtremper_mapTurn off Route 28 onto the main street in Phoenicia. Continue on Main Street which becomes Route 40 and passes the main parking area for Mount Tremper. At the intersection with Route 212 turn left and drive to VanWagner Road on the left. Turned left on VanWagner Road to get to the small hamlet of Willow. Along the way you will pass the Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary on the left. Just passed this is the intersection with Jessup Road which leads to the Willow Trail. On the corner is the Willow Post Office where you will park since there is no parking near the actual trailhead. The post office appears to be a construction trailer with a zip code sign! To begin your hike walk up Jessup Road for about 1.1 miles passing the end of the public road along the way. Turn left onto the woods road that is the first part of the trail. The trail climbs from the post office but after the turn into the woods it begins to ascend more steeply. The grade averages about 15% until it levels off at 2 miles. Along the way the route transitions from the woods road to a trail that, in some cases, hangs right on the edge of the hill. It becomes rocky and the footing can be difficult especially in wet weather. At the two mile mark the trail elevation has increased from about 1100 feet to almost 2100 feet. Along the way you may get some views of the mountains and valleys to the north and east. After a quarter mile of relatively flat walking, the trail again begins to ascend gaining another 400 feet to the trail junction with the Warner Creek Trail at 2.7 miles. At the trail junction turn left to follow the Warner Creek Trail to Mount Tremper where it ends at the fire tower. The turn is more than 90 degrees and changes the direction of travel from north to west by southwest. Initially the trail ascends some but at 3.2 miles it starts a descent to avoid sidehilling along an unnamed bump before Mount Tremper. At 4 miles another climb begins as the trail turns south and heads toward the fire tower. Over the next .85 miles you will reach a sort of summit plateau and negotiate a short descent before climbing again to reach the tower. The last ascent is about 365 feet. The Warner Creek Trail ends at the tower. To complete the out and back hike simply turn around and follow your route back to the car.
(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

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Windham to Barlow Notchnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 8.2 mi 1864 ft GPSies

Drive east on Route 23 from the village of Windham. Watch for the Elm Ridge parking area and Cross Road on the left or north side of the road. Park in the parking area and when you are ready walk to Cross Road. Cross the road and find the trail marked with blue plastic discs as well as the aqua blazes of the Long Path. The first .33 miles is pretty flat and actually parallels Route 23. The trail is not always well-maintained and can be overgrown. In addition, the area can be very damp during wet seasons which seems to attract insects. The trail turns north and begins to rise but only slightly. Walking through the evergreens may remind you a little of some of the places over on Windham High Peak. At .75 miles you will come out of the woods and cross Old Road to Jennie Notch Road. The trail follows Jennie Notch Road to where it dead ends. There is a small pond or lake on the right with a mountain behind it which can be quite picturesque. The paved road soon turns to dirt and then ends at about 1.3 miles where there is an open gate. The road actually continues as a grassy lane which is easy to follow even though the blazes are few and far between. Initially the grade of the road is gradual. It is obvious that the road was important and built up with a shale base at some point. You will pass a small pond on the left with some very limited views through the trees. Starting at 1.8 mikes the grade increases until Jennie Notch at about 2.4 miles. Along the way you can see some cliffs on the left which defines part of Ginseng Mountain. There are several switchbacks along the way but at the Notch the trail turns to the left more than 90 degrees. It begins to head up the mountain and soon the grade is 30% or more! This doesn’t last very long and between 2.6 and 2.8 miles the trail begins to sidehill along the north shoulder of Ginseng Mountain. The trail levels a little at the top and then starts to descend. The Long Path in this area is overgrown with low briars and nettles and there are several blowdowns. Over the first half mile you will lose about 260 feet from the highest point on the hike. You will be walking along a ridge with no real views. On either side of the trail you can see sky as the ridge is not very wide. In winter there are limited views since the leaves are not a factor. After the descent the trail gains some elevation and then starts the drop to Barlow’s Notch. On the descent look to the right for the best view of the day. The trail down to the Notch has several steep places. You will be at he Notch at about 3.9 miles. If you continue to walk a little farther there is a small memorial plaque to local resident Donald Sutton. You will have dropped 530 feet from the top of Ginseng Mountain. Reverse your route and remember that after the climb to the high point on Ginseng Mountain, the return trip is all downhill or flat. At the point where Jennie Notch Road meets Old Road you can reenter the woods or uSe the roads to return to the car. At the intersection turn right on Old Road, walk down to Cross Road and follow it back to the parking area. The distance on the roads is a little longer but the time is quicker.

(The map shows the parking area and the out and back hiking route.)

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Winter Clove: Rips Rocknew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 5.3 mi 1218 ft GPSies

wintercloveripsrock_map From State Route 32 north of Palenville turn west on County Route 31 Hearts Content Road just north of the Friar Tuck Inn. Turn southwest on Winter Clove Road and stay on Winter Clove Road all the way to the end. Park at the Winter Clove Inn. This is a PRIVATE resort and all the trails start on PRIVATE property. Go to the front desk in the main building and ring the bell. Ask politely if you may park and hike. The Inn will even allow you to take the descriptions they have of their trails. This hike starts by heading out across the field from the parking area by the building across from the Inn. There will be a sign listing some of the trails available one of which is Rips Rock. Cross the field an enter the trees. A sign will point to the left off the road/trail that you are on. Follow the “Hiking Trails” sign and cross the bridge. The trail will now parallel the creek briefly before turning right up the hill and passing through a switchback or two. The trail marking are a mixture of signs. red and blue paint blotches, red and blue metal tags and orange or pink ribbons. As the trail opens into the next field walk along the right hand side of the field and reenter the trees on the trail or woods road. Shortly the trail will split and you should follow the signs that point right to Rips Rock. Soon the trail heads east and away from the brook through a field and passes by a lean-to. At about .6 miles a trail turns east toward “The Ledges” but you should continue on the trail you are on, first west and then south. You will cross several small streams of running water some of which are on the trail. At .9 miles another sign points to a spur trail to “Lost Pond”. Around 1.2 miles another spur trail heads to “Lost Bridge” and just beyond that point is a short trail to the left to a campsite. At 1.5 miles you have the choice of turning left to the “Lower Rips Trail” or continuing on the same trail. Continue on the trail without turning and walk parallel to a small brook that has cut a deep gorge between and into the surrounding rock. At 1.7 miles cut across this brook. The trail begins to level a little and at 2.1 miles you will arrive at an opening in the trees that looks to the east toward the Hudson River. You are walking on the edge of an escarpment but there is another, higher ridge of rock to our right. From this point on the the trail is poorly marked as the paint blazes end and only some faded ribbons mark the way. From the Indian Lookout the trail is level but at first but then begins to drop to a small stream not shown on the map. It continues to head south and follows the stream up a hill. The trail is not well-used. At 2.4 miles a significant gorge appears and the trail swings left or southeast and ascends another small hill. It hugs the edge of the top of the hill where several views open up of the opposite side of the hollow where there are interesting rock formations. You may have to slide down a slippery rock and duck under some brush but the reward is a beautiful, expansive lookout toward the east and southeast. A small sign declares “Rips Rock 1,809 feet”. The deep chasm immediately to the south is formed by Stony Brook and is sometimes called Rip Van Winkle Hollow. Be careful walking along the narrow trail at the edge of the cliff. Wet rocks and overgrown brush tend to push you dangerously close to the edge. The views just keep getting better until the trail heads left into the woods. The trail leads roughly around the top of the hill and makes a short, steep descent between and over some rocks. The trail now changes character becoming wide and well-used. Continue to descend and pass through a few switchbacks. The trail continues to parallel the one you used on the ascent but at a lower elevation. Once you reach the junction with the trail you used earlier turn right and simply follow your early route in reverse back to the car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route as a loop.)

wintercloveripsrock_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Winter Clove: Stoppel Pointnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 6.6 mi 2762 ft GPSies

winterclovestoppel_map From State Route 32 north of Palenville turn west on County Route 31 Hearts Content Road just north of the Friar Tuck Inn. Turn southwest on Winter Clove Road and stay on Winter Clove Road all the way to the end. Park at the Winter Clove Inn. This is a PRIVATE resort and all the trails start on PRIVATE property. Go to the front desk in the main building and ring the bell. Ask politely if you may park and hike. The Inn will even allow you to take the descriptions they have of their trails. This hike starts by going past the gazebo on the back lawn of the Inn, crossing the dirt road and walking down to the covered bridge across the stream. Below the bridge is Artist Falls, a destination in itself. Continue across the bridge on the trail and do not turn right on Lovers Loop or left to the Venus Bath. Straight ahead lies the trail you want to Stoppel Point or the Yankee Smith Trail. The further you go the less well defined and marked the trail becomes. At 1.4 miles the trail turns south from its easterly course and continues to gain elevation .At about 1.7 miles the trail flattens some and wanders near the edge of the cliff. From here there are some ices views. Walk back into the woods and pick up the trail if you can. At some point you will have to give up on the trail and navigate your way up over steep terrain and through rocky ledges to Stoppel Point. Most routes seem to come out near the plane crash on the trail. At times, if you look back over your shoulder you may see blazes more easily. Turn left on the trail and walk about .2 miles to the lookout at StoppelPoint. Descend on the trail for about 1.35 miles passing the summit of North Mountain on your right. Watch for a faint path that turns to the left that goes over a large boulder. This trail leads down to Winter Clove and once you find it is better marked than the trail up. From the Escarpment Trail the path leads down to the trail to Winter Clove Falls. At times the descent is steep but there are some views along the way. At about 5 miles the trail turns west from its northerly heading. At 5.2 miles the path intersects the Falls Trail. Turn right and follow the marked trails back to the parking area over the next 1.4 miles.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route as a loop.)

winterclovestoppel_pro

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Winter Clove: The Ledgesnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagit 1.7 mi 260 ft GPSies

wintercloveledges_map From State Route 32 north of Palenville turn west on County Route 31 Hearts Content Road just north of the Friar Tuck Inn. Turn southwest on Winter Clove Road and stay on Winter Clove Road all the way to the end. Park at the Winter Clove Inn. This is a PRIVATE resort and all the trails start on PRIVATE property. Go to the front desk in the main building and ring the bell. Ask politely if you may park and hike. The INN will even allow you to take the descriptions they have of their trails. This hike starts by heading out across the field from the parking area by the building across from the Inn. There will be a sign listing some of the trails available one of which is The Ledges. Cross the field an enter the trees. A sign will point to the left off the road/trail that you are on. Follow the “Hiking Trails” sign and cross the bridge. The trail will now parallel the creek briefly before turning right up the hill and passing through a switchback or two. The trail marking are a mixture of signs. red and blue paint blotches, red and blue metal tags and orange or pink ribbons. As the trail opens into the next field walk along the right hand side of the field and reenter the trees on the trail or woods road. Shortly the trail will split and you should follow the signs that point left to The Ledges. The trail will meet a dirt road where you should turn to the left. Follow the dirt road to the end without turning down the hill. The Ledges are at the top of the hill and offer a nice, but low angle view, of the valley. Winter Clove Inn is down to the left. The Great Wall of Manitou is to the left right behind the trail you came up. The distance from the Inn to the Ledges is under one mile. Retrace your path to return to your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route as an out-and-back hike.)

wintercloveledges_pro

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Winter Clove: Venus Bathnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagit 1.4 mi 280 ft GPSies

winterclovevenus_map From State Route 32 north of Palenville turn west on County Route 31 Hearts Content Road just north of the Friar Tuck Inn. Turn southwest on Winter Clove Road and stay on Winter Clove Road all the way to the end. Park at the Winter Clove Inn. This is a PRIVATE resort and all the trails start on PRIVATE property. Go to the front desk in the main building and ring the bell. Ask politely if you may park and hike. The Inn will even allow you to take the descriptions they have of their trails. This hike starts by going past the gazebo on the back lawn of the Inn, crossing the dirt road and walking down to the covered bridge across the stream. Below the bridge is Artist Falls, a destination in itself. The falls forms directly under the bridge but there is a path to the pool at the base of the falls. From this path go back up to the bridge and continue across the bridge on the trail. Do not turn right on Lovers Loop but left to the Venus Bath. for a walk up Kiskatom Brook. There are several interesting rapids along the way. At .45 miles you will pass a footbridge to the other side. Continue on the trail along the creek. At about .8 miles of hiking you will arrive at the Venus Bath. Here a small set of rapids and waterfalls have carved a natural “bath” in the rock. Start back to the car on the same trail but cross the footbridge to the other side. The walk back to the car is only .6 miles.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route as an out-and-back hike.)

winterclovevenus_pro

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Winter Clove: Winter Clove Falls and Escarpment Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 12.1 mi 3642 ft GPSies

winterclovenorthmt_map From State Route 32 north of Palenville turn west on County Route 31 Hearts Content Road just north of the Friar Tuck Inn. Turn southwest on Winter Clove Road and stay on Winter Clove Road all the way to the end. Park at the Winter Clove Inn. This is a PRIVATE resort and all the trails start on PRIVATE property. Go to the front desk in the main building and ring the bell. Ask politely if you may park and hike. The INN will even allow you to take the descriptions they have of their trails. This hike starts by heading out across the field from the parking area by the building across from the Inn. As you walk back toward the Inn there will be a building on the left. Walk up the path next to the building and then up the gravel/dirt road that runs alongside the golf course. When the road splits, take the up branch to the left and walk up to another part of the course. Walk across the course, avoiding the greens, toward the upper left corner of the open space. You are looking for the SIXTH TEE. Pass through some trees and cross two small bridges. Walk down the fairway and take the first trail to your right. Walk up a small hill and then into a field or clearing. Walk along the left side of the field and look on the left for an old sign that says Webster’s Pass. Turn left here and walk along an old road. A sign on the right says North Point and Winter Clove Falls. Turn right here at about .6 miles into the hike. From here the trail climbs a little and then starts downhill, At about .8 miles the trail turns to the left at a sign again designating North Point and Winter Clove Falls. From here the trail climbs steadily using old woods roads until at 1.35 miles it splits. Bear to the right toward Winter Clove Falls. Along the way you may hear the roar of the water of a creek to your right and, at times, you may see the water forming small drops and rapids along the way. At 1.65 miles the trail descends a little and crosses an old creek bed with several downed trees. From this point on the trail markers are scarce and a little faded but continue to follow the creek bed.You will keep getting closer to the creek and should see glimpses of the falls ahead. The trail climbs steeply at this point to the top of the falls. There is a view along the clove out into the valley toward the Hudson but how could the view is depends on the lighting and the amount of haze. The falls has two major drops and the water volume controls how impressive they will be. You can carefully work my way down the north bank to the area between the two drops. This is not easy but it does allow you to get a view of the upper drop head-on. Work your way back to the top of the falls. At this point it is worth spending some time bushwhacking further up the stream to some more falls. How far you get on this bushwhack depends on the water level and your own desires. Headed back down the stream and down the trail you came up. Several paths lead down to the stream below the falls but all were very steep. Head back down the trail to where it split at about 2.75 into the hike. Turn right and start up the trail toward North Point. The trail is steep in most places and steeper in others. It is clear this is “the road less traveled” as there is little evidence of use and many of the paint blazes are very faded. At about 3.0 miles the trail turns left and starts an ascent that is about a mile long and gains over 1300′. Parts of the trail follow old roads up the mountain. In other places the trail leaves the roads to take even steeper ascents. Near the top the angle is at least 45 degrees! On the way up the trail you can see the Blackhead Range to the right but the view is obscured by the trees. At around 3.9 miles you will we skirt some cliffs. On top there is one rock that offers an unobstructed view of the mountains. The trail is ill-defined toward the top but at about 4.0 miles into the hike you should hit the Escarpment Trail at 3100 feet slightly northeast of North Mountain. There is a nice viewpoint over North South Lake at this point. Turn right on the trail which is relatively heading toward Stoppel Point. At Stoppel Point you should be about 5.4 miles into the hike and one option is to return the way you came. Continue on the Escarpment Trail and watch for a viewpoint on the left side on the trail toward KHP and Round Top. Continue on to the plane crash. There is a “trail” from the the plane crash down a ridge to the Winter Clove Inn but it is hard to find and overgrown. Continue on the Escarpment Trail to the Dutcher Notch Trail. On the way you will pass by Milt’s Lookout at about 6.6 miles. From the lookout it is a 600 foot drop over the next 1.1 miles to the Dutcher Notch Trail and the last part of the descent was steep. The Dutcher Notch Trail follows a road that was the main connection between the farms in the Jewett Valley and the markets near the Hudson in Catskill and Cairo. The road was sited at the lowest point in the Wall of Manitou. Since the wagons could not ascend or descend directly due to the elevation gain over a short distance the road on the east side had to have a sweeping switchback. The trail stars slightly to the east but then turns southeast nearly paralleling the escarpment. It is interesting to walk down this trail below the escarpment where you were earlier. The road is so eroded in places that the trail travels along the high bank often on stone walls. After about a mile and 770 feet of descent the trail swings toward the northeast and continues to descend. It begins to follow a stream bed and enters private property with an easement. Continue on the trail as it passed across the lawn of a private residence and through a locked gate onto paved road at about 9.7 miles. After about .5 miles on Storks Nest Road turn right on Floyd Hawver Road. Hike a little more than 1.1 miles on Hawver Road before turning right on Winter Clove Road. After walking .5 miles on Winter Clove Road you will be back at the Inn and your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route as a loop.)

winterclovenorthmt_pro

(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Winter Clove: Yankee Smith and Lover’s Loopnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

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hiker_snagit 4.1 mi 720 ft GPSies

wintercloveyankeelover_map From State Route 32 north of Palenville turn west on County Route 31 Hearts Content Road just north of the Friar Tuck Inn. Turn southwest on Winter Clove Road and stay on Winter Clove Road all the way to the end. Park at the Winter Clove Inn. This is a PRIVATE resort and all the trails start on PRIVATE property. Go to the front desk in the main building and ring the bell. Ask politely if you may park and hike. The Inn will even allow you to take the descriptions they have of their trails. This hike starts by going past the gazebo on the back lawn of the Inn, crossing the dirt road and walking down to the covered bridge across the stream. Below the bridge is Artist Falls, a destination in itself. Continue across the bridge on the trail and do not turn right on Lovers Loop but continue on the trail marked Yankee Smith. This trail leads to an area of stone walls that were built around the time of the American Revolution. The trail is blazed with red paint and is relatively easy to follow. It makes some twists and turns along the way. The first mile is a steady ascent followed by a drop. At 1.25 miles the trail begins to drop and some stone walls appear. Watch closely for the blazes and continue to follow them until about 1.5 miles where a smiley face on a tree announces the end of the trail. In the area is an impressive network of stone walls. The walls are on either side of a lane formed by more stone walls. Follow the lane which continues for several hundred feet before joining a woods road. Continue straight ahead through the forest and down an embankment to a stream with a nice waterfall. Sheba and I bushwhacked down the hill to the creek. Climb back up the hill to the road and return to the lane. Hike back down the lane and pick up the trail back at the “smiley face”. The trail is blazed in blue for the return trip. At 3.0 miles into the hike you will be at a trail junction with the Stoppel Point Trail. Continue straight heading back toward Winter Clove Inn. At 3.1 miles turn left on the Lovers Loop trail and head north toward the pond. You will arrived at the small pond at 3.6 miles. Continue around the loop and you will end up back near Artist Falls. Continue back to your car.

(The map shows the parking area and the hiking route as an out-and-back hike with a short loop.)

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(The image shows the profile of the hike. Remember that all vertical profiles are relative!)


Woodpecker and Millbrook Ridgesnew-house-iconnew-arrow-up

Quick Look
Difficulty Round trip Total climb Internet Maps
hiker_snagithiker_snagithiker_snagit 7.5 mi. 2000 ft. GPSies

WoodpeckerMillbrook_map Woodpecker Ridge is one of the more western CHH peaks located in the Town of Hardenburgh in Ulster County. It is only accessible by bushwhacking. One way to hike this peak is to hike the Millbrook Ridge Trail that runs between Alder Lake and Balsam Lake Mountain. The high point on the ridge is less than a mile from where the Millbrook Ridge Trail passes by Woodpecker Ridge Another route is to park at the trailhead for the Mongaup Hardenburgh Trail and cross the road. From Livingston Manor (Exit 96 from I86) drive north and west on Old Route 17. Turn right on Beaverkill Road and continue on this road through the hamlets of Lew Beach and Turnwood. Watch for the road sign for Alder Creek Road on your left. Drive to the end of the road and turn right into the access road for ALder Lake. Park one car in the lot here. Drive back out to the Beaverkill Road and turn left to continue north. Watch for a sign for Cradle Rock Ridge on the right. Continue passed this sign until you see a small parking area for the beginning of the trail on your right. Park here and walk down the trail to the Beaverkill. Take some pictures of the suspension bridge over the river here. Return to your car, cross the road and enter the woods. Head UP and almost due north for a little over two miles. The woods are mostly open with only a few rocky areas. Once the terrain flattens out it is a long walk to the highest point. There may be some viewpoints for Balsam Lake Mountain on the eastern side of the summit plateau. A little clearing opens up on top of the plateau. Continue due north until about 2.7 miles where you should hit the Millbrook Ridge trail. The MOST IMPORTANT thing to remember is to stay on the high ground of the ridge. Dropping off the ridge means you will simply have to regain that lost elevation. Turn left or west on the Millbrook ridge Trail. As you walk along the trail watch carefully for the marking as they sometimes are hard to spot. After a short distance there will be a lookout right on the trail. Below the lookout is Beecher Lake which has a Buddhist Monastery on its shores. There are also nice views of the surrounding hills. Continue your walk passing through a Col and climbing to the highest point on Millbrook Ridge at just under 4 miles into the hike. The elevation here is around 3470 feet leaving it 30 feet short of a Catskill 35. From here the trip to Alder Lake is all downhill with two minor bumps. At 5.25 miles there is a lean-to which looks out over a beaver meadow. This is a nice place to stop for a break before the final push to Alder Lake. Continue down the trail until you near Alder Lake and intersect the loop trail at 6.6 miles. Turn right and head around the lake to your car.

(The map shows the parking areas and the one way hiking route.)
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(The image shows the vertical profile of the entire one way hiking route.)